For Greek readers/speakers...

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by robycop3, Oct 11, 2006.

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  1. robycop3

    robycop3
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    How close is Koine Greek to currently-used Greek?

    I don't expect anyone to answer in minute detail, but please point out some of the major differences, if there are any.
     
  2. Forever settled in heaven

    Forever settled in heaven
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    French n English share the same alphabet n even some vocab, but recognition of words in French is purely random for me.

    i get the same feeling looking at modern Greek--i see all the familiar characters, but o boy, where's a familiar word? which is a noun? is that a particle? ew, better get back to reading the NT! :BangHead:
     
  3. franklinmonroe

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    In terms of speaking, no authoritative source exists in determining how Greek was pronounced during New Testament times. In addition, a variety of Greek dialects were spoken during that era because of geographical isolation. Erasmian Greek is a pronunciation system today that is taught in many institutions (which is like neither NT nor modern).

    The written Greek has changed in various ways throughout history. The Ionic alphabet (dialect spoken mainly in the Greek city-states directly across the Aegean Sea from Athens) became a standard by about the middle of the fourth century BC. Alexander carried the Attic(classical)-Ionic form of the language into the Near East where it normally was adopted as a second language by the native people of these regions and was ultimately transformed into what has come to be called the Hellenistic Koiné (common Greek). The Koiné Period extends from about 330BC to 330AD. Some diacritical markings were added and some dropped as recently as 1982. The modern Greek capital letters are almost identical to those of the Ionic alphabet. NT Greek letters were also used as numerals.

    [FYI - lower case letters (minuscules) didn't appear until about the eighth century AD, and would not have been used by the Apostle writers]
     
    #3 franklinmonroe, Oct 11, 2006
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  4. John of Japan

    John of Japan
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    I don't speak modern Greek so I don't know much about this, except that the koine verb system is more complicated. Modern Greek has simplified the verbs down through the years.
     
  5. robycop3

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    Thanx, all respondents, for your input so far.
     
  6. Dr. Bob

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    Classical Greek (400 BCE) is closely akin to Koine Greek (100 CE), the lingua franca of the Western World until passed by Latin (c 300 CE)

    I studied Thucydides in Classical at the University of Wisconsin and of course the NT and LXX in Koine. But when walking the streets of Athens, I have trouble even reading the signs in the store windows.

    And listening to it, in the rapid-fire of daily conversation, I am more deaf than usual!!
     
  7. Ed Edwards

    Ed Edwards
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    I learned a little conversational Greek when I lived on the
    Island of Crete for 18 Months with my rich uncle.

    When I was in Athens, I was accused of speaking with
    a Cretian accent :)
     
  8. Jim1999

    Jim1999
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    I guess you could understand my Greek with a Cockney accent then,eh guv'nor.

    I had the toughest time just pronouncing the Koine Greek whilst in seminary. It was almost like speaking high school French in Quebec.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
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