Full Gospel Baptist Fellowship

Discussion in 'Baptist History' started by Kiffin, Aug 14, 2002.

  1. Kiffin

    Kiffin
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    Here is a unique Baptist fellowship. They are Charismatic in theology but seem to follow a episcopal form of Church government. I have not found their doctrinal statement however.

    Full Gospel Baptist Fellowship
     
  2. boris99

    boris99
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    I wonder how "Baptist" they really are...
     
  3. GrannyGumbo

    GrannyGumbo
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    How y'all are? [​IMG] Here's an *interesting* article I just came across~

    "Pentecostal Bishop Speaks At Full Gospel Baptist Fellowship - Pentecostal Bishop Paul S. Morton called on fellow Pentecostals to ensure their churches' leadership roles remain open to women. He also suggested the Southern Baptists might one day have to apologize for their defense of an all-male clergy, as they did for racial segregation of their congregations. (Religion News Service, 7/14/00).

    Morton spoke 7/10/00 before members of the Full Gospel Baptist Church Fellowship in New Orleans on the subject of hospitality to women. Mr. Morton and this Baptist(?) group must have missed reading the qualification for the office of bishop or pastor. (1 Tim. 3:2) This is not refusing "hospitality" to women. (Read 1 Tim. 5:2-5; Titus 2:3-5)

    It is God's criterion for the highest office in the Lord's church. However, if the Lord did not institute the church Mr. Morton (or these Baptist[?]) are members of, they may set any rules they care too. Just don't tell the Lord what to do about `His' church. - W.W.Mosley
     
  4. Kiffin

    Kiffin
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    I heard part of Morton's sermon on the WORD TV network tonight from the FGBF meeting in Baltimore. I have never heard of a Baptist denomination that separates the offices of bishop and elder. They have a college of bishops as well as a presiding bishop. Just believing in Believer's baptism is not enough to call one Baptist in that one could call the Church of God in Christ and the Assemblies of God, Baptist if that is the case. I just wonder what Baptist distinctives they hold to :confused:
     
  5. Michael Wrenn

    Michael Wrenn
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    Their doctrinal statement is on their website.

    Despite having bishops, they still affirm the autonomy of the local church. And their definition of "baptism of the Holy Spirit" is not the same as the Pentecostals/Charismatics define it--this is also on their web page. They simply believe that all the gifts of the Spirit mentioned in the Bible are available to believers today.

    I like this group.

    BTW, since there were women deacons in the New Testament, I wonder who has really abandoned God's "rules" for His church.
     
  6. Jim1999

    Jim1999
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    Even a short read of church history will disclose how many cults came out of Baptist Churches. I am getting too old to be surprised at anything that surfaces.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  7. rsr

    rsr
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    An interesting article on the history of African-American Baptist bishops:

    BISHOP TREND BUCKS TRADITION

    Such a third office is not without historical precedent. Some of the English General Baptists adopted the office of "messenger."

    — L. Leon McBeth, The Baptist Witness

    Such trends have been most pronounced among early General Baptists, which adopted associationalism more readily than the Particulars; some formed presbyteries.

    Still, I think this particular example is drawn more from Pentecostal than Baptist influence and reflects the older episcopacy of the Anglican Church and the Methodist Church from which much of modern Pentecostalism originated.
     

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