G-d or God?

Discussion in '2004 Archive' started by Tim, Feb 11, 2004.

  1. Tim

    Tim
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    With the surging popularity of Messianic Jewish ideas, I've noticed that I see people refering to God as G-d more often.

    Can anyone give me a Biblical basis for doing this?
     
  2. Joseph_Botwinick

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    It is based on Jewish tradition. This is the same tradition that prompts them to say hashem (the name) instead of saying the divine name of YHWH. I think it is loosely based on the commandment to not take the name of God in vain.

    Joseph Botwinick
     
  3. Gina B

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    EX 20:7 Thou shalt not take the name of the LORD thy God in vain; for the LORD will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain.

    Taking it in vain would be to say it too much, say it when not neccessary. The name is holy, and another tradition was not to put the full name on anything that could wear away, such as paper.
    But...for biblical explainment alone like you asked for that's the verse.
    Gina
     
  4. Artimaeus

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    If God didn't want the Jews to say His name why did He tell Moses to tell them "YHWH" sent him? Just a thought.
     
  5. Joseph_Botwinick

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    I may be wrong, but I remember hearing somewhere that it is because they don't really know the correct pronounciation of YHWH (There is quite a controversy about this issue) and therefore they say hashem (the Name) so as to not take his name in vain.

    Joseph Botwinick
     
  6. Gina B

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    Artimaeus, it's not to deny saying the name, but to avoid vain repetitions of it, which could cause it to be taken lightly, like it is in much of the world now. People don't have much respect for it anymore and it doesn't hit them as much more than just another word in conversation.
    Gina
     
  7. Artimaeus

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    Gina, that is quite true. I was just commenting on the topic of people who find it necessary to not say His name at all, as though they are being more spiritual and respectful than those of us who do use His name respectfully.
     
  8. Abiyah

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    Tim --

    I rarely write the word, "G-d," but I will often write "our God." Admittedly, it is mainly so that I will not be offensive to Jews, Messianics, or Christians. For example, I will write, "Our God is faithful," thus not directly calling Him "G-d"; less often will I write, "G-d is faithful."

    We in the Torah-observant movement tend to want to think for ourselves and not blindly follow someone else's mandates. :-D My thought regarding this is that "God" is not His Name; it is His office. His Name is holy and should be written only with great concentrated thought and deepest awe; if both are not present, it is better that the Name not be upon the pen or the screen. When I want to write a Name for Him, I almost invariably write HaShem.

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    Joseph_Botwinick
    Exactly. :)

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    Gina L --
    Right. :)

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    Artimaeus --

    Not quite, Artimaeus! :-D They could not care less about what others think of them when making such choices that are different from Christians' choices, based upon their beliefs. You are placing far more importance upon what others think of them than they do.

    I have a lot of discourse with Christians on boards and on a personal level, and I see many as fellow travelers with me. Therefore, I have no desire to be an affront to them or to those who believe as I do.

    But when it comes to the bottom line -- my core beliefs -- I don't care if you think my actions portray a "holier than thou" attitude, because what you think of me has no bearing whatsoever upon my intentions or upon my service to our God! Your thoughts are your thoughts alone. We know, after all, that when we stand before our God to give an account, it will not be Artimaeus upon the throne; it will be our holy God.
     
  9. donnA

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    I've never been comfortable with this "G-d". Since it is not written this way in the bible, I think or respect in this matter needs to be with God, and not men, our worry about offense needs to be God not men. If men are offended by God, then so be it.
     
  10. Dr. Bob

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    "God" or "G-d" are not written that way in the Bible, either. They are written in English translations. Spanish and German and French et al use different terms.

    Having grown up in the midst of Judaism, I can NEVER remember seeing "God" written in full! Even on the chalkboard in Talmud-Torah school, it was in English "G-d".

    And when it came to the OT, the word "Adonai" is most often substituted for YHWH.

    When I do the Lord's Supper prayer (from passover) in church each month, it is WRITTEN as if it should be "Baruch atoh h'YHWH" - but it is pronounced "Baruch atoh Adonai".

    No big deal. But even in my shorthand when writing today, I put a "X" for Christ, "Xn" for christian, "ek" for church, "LJC" for Lord Jesus Christ and "Gd" for God. Think everybody does some short-cuts like that when writing.
     
  11. donnA

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    Dr. Bob, as long as it's in my english bible I'll take it. And until G-d is in it I won't be using it. And no, I do not take short cuts as far as God and His name are concerned.
     
  12. Dr. Bob

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    Your choice, Donna, just don't shoot at those who do use shorthand.

    BTW, R U against ALL abbrev? Let me know, ASAP! [​IMG]
     
  13. Tim

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    I certainly agree that people take God's name in vain way too often in our culture.

    However, the thing that bothers me about using G-d is that it makes God seem less approachable, as if we can't even say His name respectfully.

    It doesn't seem to fit with Paul's invitation to call Him "Abba" (Rom. 8:15, Gal. 4:6)--which from what I've heard is equivalent to "Daddy". That seems very personal--yet we're told it is appropriate.

    So isn't G-d just an overreaction to real profanity?
     
  14. Johnv

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    He didn't He said "I Am who I Am" (or I will be who I will be) has sent him."

    In other words, God was saying, "Look, I ain't gonna give you a calling card".
     
  15. Dr. Bob

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    He didn't He said "I Am who I Am" (or I will be who I will be) has sent him."</font>[/QUOTE]Actually He said His name was "YHWH H'YHWH". It is loosely translated "I am that I am" in English. So Artimaeus is right on.

    This is God's pet name, personal name, name that showed the closest relationship was and is YHWH.

    You can call me
    Doc
    Dr Bob
    Bob
    Dr Griffin
    Robert
    Robert Griffin
    Reverend

    even call me
    Hey You
    Big Guy
    Dude

    but if you are the oldest and closest friend and call me
    Grif

    you will be answered immediately
     
  16. Artimaeus

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    Whew! and ain't we all glad about that. :D Abiyah, I meant no disrespect to you, merely mild disagreement. Everyone is interested in showing the right amount of respect to our God. When you say, "His Name is holy and should be written only with great concentrated thought and deepest awe;" which, in context, means it is better accomplished by "G-d" than "God" then you are doing what I was doing, merely making a judgement call and I was not putting myself in place of the Almighty. (That hurt a little bit.)
     
  17. Joseph_Botwinick

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    This seems like a mountain out of a molehill to me. Whether we write God or G-d, I think he knows who we are referring to. To me, this seems like a cultural thing that is a non-essential. Just my opinion.

    Joseph Botwinick
     
  18. Abiyah

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    Whew! and ain't we all glad about that. :D Abiyah, I meant no disrespect to you, merely mild disagreement. Everyone is interested in showing the right amount of respect to our God. When you say, "His Name is holy and should be written only with great concentrated thought and deepest awe;" which, in context, means it is better accomplished by "G-d" than "God" then you are doing what I was doing, merely making a judgement call and I was not putting myself in place of the Almighty. (That hurt a little bit.) </font>[/QUOTE]I am so sorry, Artimaeus! I did not remember being confrontational with you, but when I reread my post, I could see that this was certainly how it read. And Artimaeus, I did not feel like you were disrespectful.

    In my statement, "His Name is holy and should be written only with great concentrated thought and deepest awe," this was not in reference to the word, God (although that word must have respect); rather in reference to His actual names. :) I really understand those who are offended at the written "G-d."

    Artimaeus, I do not believe you would Ever attempt to put yourself, in any way, in the place of our God. No way.

    I am so sorry I offended you, Artimaeus; I assure you that it was not intentional.
     
  19. Johnv

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    My Hebrew copy of the Torah says "Ehyeh asher Ehyeh" (translated literally as, I will be what I will be, but known more commonly as "I am that I am").

    Anyhoo, probably just splitting hairs, here. The point is that God wasn't handing Moses a calling card.
     
  20. Artimaeus

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    Abiyah, don't give it a second thought, I figured it was most likely one of those typing conversation vs person to person conversation glitches.
     

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