Galatians 6:9

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by Pastor_Bob, Jun 14, 2008.

  1. Pastor_Bob

    Pastor_Bob
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2002
    Messages:
    3,461
    Likes Received:
    45
    Gal 6:9 And let us not be weary in well doing: for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not. (KJV)

    This verse teaches us that we need to keep doing good in spite of weariness. If we keep sowing good seed, we will reap the harvest if we do not quit.

    Some modern translations imply that we will not reap if we even grow weary in the work.

    Let us not lose heart in doing good, for in due time we will reap if we do not grow weary. (NASB)
    Let us never tire of doing right, for at the proper season we shall reap our harvest, if we do not grow weary. (TCNT)

    If these translations are accurate, who then can ever reap the harvest? Who of us do not grow weary?
     
  2. Deacon

    Deacon
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2002
    Messages:
    6,971
    Likes Received:
    128
    Gal 6:7,8

    Don’t be misled—you cannot mock the justice of God.
    You will always harvest what you plant.
    Those who live only to satisfy their own sinful nature will harvest decay and death from that sinful nature.
    But those who live to please the Spirit will harvest everlasting life from the Spirit.

    Rob
     
    #2 Deacon, Jun 14, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 14, 2008
  3. Pastor_Bob

    Pastor_Bob
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2002
    Messages:
    3,461
    Likes Received:
    45
    Either I do not understand the relevance of your answer or you didn't understand the question.
     
  4. Deacon

    Deacon
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2002
    Messages:
    6,971
    Likes Received:
    128
    Whew it's hot outside! :godisgood: (nice + cool in here!)

    Pastor_Bob, verses 7-9 of Galatians 6 are a unit; they form one thought.
    Reading a verse in its context clears up many questions and can eliminate confusion.
    In that first post of mine I quoted the verses before yours (in the New Living Translation). :saint:

    The general principle Paul develops here is, “…for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap.” (Galatians 6:7 AV 1873).

    The same theme is repeated a number of times through Galatians.

    Are ye so foolish? having begun in the Spirit, are ye now made perfect by the flesh?
    Have ye suffered so many things in vain? if it be yet in vain.

    Galatians 3:3-4 AV 1873

    Ye did run well; who did hinder you that ye should not obey the truth?
    Galatians 5:7(ff) AV 1873

    In the other instances that this particular word is used (Matt 15:32; Mark 8:3; Heb 12:3,5) the Authorized Version consistently translated it as “faint”.
    IMO, the meaning of the word has developed over the past 400+ years, weary” is merely a synonym of “faint.

    The Louw-Nida Greek-English Lexicon (1:318) says this concerning the Greek word for “weary/faint”:

    25.288 ἐγκακέω; ἐκλύομαιb: to lose one’s motivation to accomplish some valid goal—‘to become discouraged, to lose heart, to give up.’
    ἐγκακέω: μὴ ἐγκακήσητε καλοποιοῦντες ‘don’t be discouraged in doing good’ 2 Th 3.13; διὸ αἰτοῦμαι μὴ ἐγκακεῖν ἐν ταῖς θλίψεσίν μου ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν ‘as I suffer difficulties on your behalf, I ask you not to give up’ Eph 3.13. In place of a negative expression such as ‘not to give up,’ it may be better in some languages to use a positive equivalent, for example, ‘to keep on’ or ‘to continue.’
    ἐκλύομαιb: καιρῷ γὰρ ἰδίῳ θερίσομεν μὴ ἐκλυόμενοι ‘for if we do not give up, the time will come when we will harvest’ Ga 6.9; μηδὲ ἐκλύου ὑπ αὐτοῦ ἐλεγχόμενος ‘do not be discouraged when he rebukes you’ He 12.5.

    Rob
     
    #4 Deacon, Jun 14, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 14, 2008
  5. TomVols

    TomVols
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2000
    Messages:
    11,170
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think the difference is in how you translate me ekluomenoi. It appears both renderings could be justified. The clause relates back to the first clause of doing well. If we do not grow weary of doing well, we will reap a harvest. The truth and meaning is not damaged by either translation.
     
  6. TomVols

    TomVols
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2000
    Messages:
    11,170
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm jealous of those who post in a Greek font:) Wish I could
     
  7. Deacon

    Deacon
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2002
    Messages:
    6,971
    Likes Received:
    128
    In most cases it's just a matter of finding the proper Greek text then cutting and pasting.

    With short Greek words and phrases you can use MS Word and use the "insert" tab >> "symbols" >> "GraecaII" to slooowly craft the Greek word.
    After you've developed the Greek word in MSWord, cut and paste it in your BB reply.

    I'm jealous over your transliteration skills, I've never fully developed mine.

    Rob
     
  8. TomVols

    TomVols
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2000
    Messages:
    11,170
    Likes Received:
    0
    I just looked at the NKJV.
    "Lose heart" is an interesting way of translating ἐκλυόμενοι (stole that from you, Deacon). Seems a tad more free than ESV, NASB, etc.
     
  9. robycop3

    robycop3
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2000
    Messages:
    7,573
    Likes Received:
    10
    Same message, different English styles.
     
  10. Cutter

    Cutter
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2006
    Messages:
    1,564
    Likes Received:
    0
    Luke 5:39 No man also having drunk old [wine] straightway desireth new: for he saith, The old is better.
     
  11. EdSutton

    EdSutton
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    8,755
    Likes Received:
    0
    Agreed here, as to all the given English versions cited. I don't see any real difference, at least in Gal. 6:9.

    Ed
     
  12. EdSutton

    EdSutton
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    8,755
    Likes Received:
    0
    Which has exactly what to do with the various renderings of Gal. 6:9??? :(

    Cutter, I have no problem with anyone preferring any particular version of Scripture overall, or as to a particular verse or verses, and often cite various ones myself, including versions I do not generally prefer, overall.

    I do have a problem with convoluted eisegesis, or citing a verse completely out of context, in order to support some opinion that the text will not support, on its own. This is such a case, with your cite of a single verse, since it has exactly zero to do with any rendering of Gal. 6:9. (BTW, what version are you citing from, anyway, since you did not identify it, and I have no intention of doing your homework for you?)
    As the subject 'headings' in the version I am citing from note, this refers to Jesus' answer to the Pharisees about fasting. Gal. 6:9 has absolutely no referrence to fasting, as I read it, in any version.

    Incidentally, I bought my bride :love2: a copy of Scripture in the HCSB, in the 'Lifeway' booth (at half price), :thumbs: at the SBC in Indianapolis.
    I am presenting it to her this AM.

    Ed
     
    #12 EdSutton, Jun 15, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 15, 2008
  13. David Lamb

    David Lamb
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Messages:
    2,982
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Rob! At last! I have asked this question several times, and now you've given an answer that works. I tried copying and pasting from the bible versions and commentaries on my PC, but the Greek text just came out at English letters, like this: poiew But copying and pasting into an MS Word document first, then copying and pasting from MS Word into my BB message, it comes out properly, in Greek letters: poiew
     
  14. Crabtownboy

    Crabtownboy
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2008
    Messages:
    16,632
    Likes Received:
    158
    One sows, another harvests. Neither is to be proud nor arrogant, but to praise God for the work they were able to do. :godisgood:
     
  15. franklinmonroe

    franklinmonroe
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    2,872
    Likes Received:
    3
    Another case of an English word with more than one meaning. While "faint" could be synonymous with the state of brief unconsciousness ('passed out'), it also could be archaically defined as a state of physical, emotional, or spiritual weakness (and there is even application of the word beyond these). Notice this portion from Webster's 1828 --
    FAINT, v.i.
    1. To lose the animal functions; to lose strength and color, and become senseless and motionless; to swoon; sometimes with away.
    He fainted for loss of blood.
    On hearing the honor intended her, she fainted away.

    2. To become feeble; to decline or fail in strength and vigor; to be weak.
    If I send them away fasting to their own houses, they will faint by the way. Mark 8.
    3. To sink into dejection; to lose courage or spirit.
    Let not your hearts faint. Deut. 20.
    If thou faint in the day of adversity, thy strength is small. Prov. 24.
    4. To decay; to disappear; to vanish.
    Gilded clouds, while we gaze on them, faint before the eye.
    Furthermore, "faint" when used as an adjective indicates weakness, not complete absence (as in 'a faint heartbeat' or 'a faint star'). "Faint" in Middle English approximated deceitful or cowardly action (from Old French, past participle of feindre, to feign.)

    So, which meaning did the king's revisors intend? Well, the Greek word translated "faint" here literally means to dissolve or set free (loosed, unloosen); metaphorically it can mean to have one's strength relaxed, to be enfeebled through exhaustion, to be tired out, or even to despond. There seems to be no indication that the Greek word carries the concept of loosing the capacity for sensory perception ('awareness').

    Additionally, to "faint" (losing consciousness) is only a temporary condition from which the individual revives and therefore is not equivalent a permanent status (as "quit" might indicate). It would seem that the comparison of multiple versions has served us well by bringing our attention upon some individual words and phrases, and ultimately to a more complete understanding of the scripture.
     
    #15 franklinmonroe, Jun 17, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 17, 2008

Share This Page

Loading...