Global Warming - Southern Baptists Change Stance

Discussion in 'Politics' started by sonyaj68, Mar 13, 2008.

  1. sonyaj68

    sonyaj68
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    :praying: I was a bit disappointed to read the following article:

    Southern Baptists Change Stance, Say Stopping Global Warming a Biblical Duty

    09:35 PM CDT on Sunday, March 9, 2008
    Associated Press

    :BangHead: NEW YORK – In a major shift, a group of Southern Baptist leaders said their denomination has been "too timid" on environmental issues and has a biblical duty to stop global warming.

    The declaration, signed by the president of the Southern Baptist Convention among others and released today, shows a growing urgency about climate change even within groups that once dismissed claims of an overheating planet as a liberal ruse.

    The conservative denomination has 16.3 million members and is the largest Protestant group in the U.S.

    The signers of "A Southern Baptist Declaration on the Environment and Climate Change" acknowledged that not all Christians accept the science behind global warming. They said they do not expect fellow believers to back any proposed solutions that would violate Scripture, such as advocating population control through abortion.

    However, the leaders said that evidence of global warming is "substantial," and that the threat is too grave to wait for perfect knowledge about whether, or how much, people contribute to the trend.

    "We believe our current denominational resolutions and engagement with these issues have often been too timid," according to the statement. "Our cautious response to these issues in the face of mounting evidence may be seen by the world as uncaring, reckless and ill-informed. We can do better."

    The last Southern Baptist statement on global warming came at the denomination's 2007 annual meeting, which approved a statement questioning the belief that humans are largely to blame for climate change and warning that increased regulation of greenhouse gases will hurt the poor.

    No one speaks on behalf of all Southern Baptists, who leave decision-making to local churches. Yet, the signatories of today's resolution represent some of the top figures in the convention.

    Among them are the denomination's president, the Rev. Frank Page of South Carolina; two former presidents, the Rev. James Merritt of Georgia and the Rev. Jack Graham of Texas; and the Rev. Ronnie Floyd of Arkansas, who helped conservatives solidify control of the denomination in the 1970s and 1980s.

    Also backing the effort are presidents of three prominent Baptist-affiliated schools: Union University in Tennessee; Samford University's Beeson Divinity School in Alabama; and Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in North Carolina. More than 35 leaders signed the statement.

    Supporters plan to collect more signatures for the declaration through a Web site and encourage congregations to work for environmental protection.

    Even before today's statement, religious activism on climate change had broadened beyond just liberal-leaning churches. The 1993 "Evangelical Declaration on the Care of Creation" became a guiding document for the Evangelical Environmental Network. But many of the most conservative Christians, including some Southern Baptist leaders, remained skeptical, and vigorously challenged evangelical environmentalists.

    Even so, Jonathan Merritt, a student at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, began rallying denominational leaders to take a different approach. Mr. Merritt, 25, son of former convention president James Merritt, said a theology class had inspired him.

    His professor had compared destroying God's creation to "tearing a page out of the Bible."

    "That struck me. It broke me," the younger Merritt said, "and that was the impetus that began a life change, a shift of perspective for me."


    We should be good stewards of what God gave us, but we should not lose focus on the Great Commission! At the very least, taking a "stance" on global warming is an unnecessary diversion by the SBC when people are dying and going to hell. My prayer is that we as Christians focus on doing God's will daily in the time He has given us. Romans 1:25 : Who changed the truth of God into a lie, and worshipped and served the creature more than the Creator, who is blessed for ever.
     
  2. Revmitchell

    Revmitchell
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2006
    Messages:
    38,332
    Likes Received:
    786
    The AP is incorrect:


    "Let me clearly state that I do not believe this is true of the Southern Baptist Convention in an official capacity. In fact, Southern Baptists have long stood for a clear environmental message which takes seriously God's call to guard and keep the earth. We have been balanced and responsive in our calls for care. As Southern Baptist Convention president, I totally stand behind the resolutions that have been passed in recent years."

    http://www.bpnews.net/bpnews.asp?id=27601

    absolutely nothing has changed.
     
  3. carpro

    carpro
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    20,907
    Likes Received:
    295
    I'll agree with the SBC...

    just as soon as it is proven that cause of the so called "global warming" phenomenom is a fact.
     
  4. JustChristian

    JustChristian
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    Messages:
    3,833
    Likes Received:
    0
    What's official? The president of the SBC backing this resolution? Read on.

    http://www.wtopnews.com/?nid=104&sid=1361085


    The declaration, signed by the president of the Southern Baptist Convention among others and released Monday, shows a growing urgency about climate change even within groups that once dismissed claims of an overheating planet as a liberal ruse. The conservative denomination has 16.3 million members and is the largest Protestant group in the U.S.

    Among them are the denomination's president, the Rev. Frank Page of South Carolina; two former presidents, the Rev. James Merritt of Georgia and the Rev. Jack Graham of Texas; and the Rev. Ronnie Floyd of Arkansas, who helped conservatives solidify control of the denomination in the 1970s and 1980s.
    Also backing the effort are presidents of three prominent Baptist-affiliated schools: David Dockery of Union University in Tennessee; Timothy George of Samford University's Beeson Divinity School in Alabama; and Danny Akin of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in North Carolina. More than 35 people signed the statement.
     
  5. Timsings

    Timsings
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2006
    Messages:
    585
    Likes Received:
    0
    Here we go again. What is this, the third thread on this topic? How many times do we have to go over this? The same people are posting the same stuff. All right, I can be redundant too. This issue is not about political or theological issues; it is not about whether to evangelize the lost or not. It is about our stewardship of what God has given us. In this case, it is about the world and our role in it. Man, I'm getting tired of going over this :BangHead: again :BangHead: again :BangHead: and again!!!

    Tim Reynolds
     
  6. Magnetic Poles

    Magnetic Poles
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2005
    Messages:
    10,407
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yes Tim, it's the old ploy of say it often enough and maybe it will be true. Those who have some personal axe to grind regardless of the impact on society, won't be convinced no matter what the facts show.
     
  7. Revmitchell

    Revmitchell
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2006
    Messages:
    38,332
    Likes Received:
    786
    It doesn't matter this adds to nothing and the SBC has not changed its position. This is a group of individuals not the SBC.
     
  8. Martin

    Martin
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2005
    Messages:
    5,228
    Likes Received:
    0
    ==That is, at best, a false choice. It is possible to be a good steward of the earth and be evangelistic at the same time.

    ==Again, a false choice. It is not "either/or" it is "and".


    ==That verse does not even apply to this issue, so why quote it in this context? Nobody is talking about worshipping the earth or putting earth issues ahead of evangelism (etc). We are just talking about our responsibility to take care of the planet that God has given us. Which, btw, was the first job God ever gave to a human (Gen 2:7-8,15).

    I don't know why so many Christians are opposed to taking care of our temporary home. You folks clean up your houses don't you? I assume so. If you clean up your houses it would seem to me only logical to make sure the air we breath, the water we drink, and food we eat is clean. I just don't understand the problem. Maybe too many Christians are engaging in group think on this? Maybe too many Christians are creating false choices (like you did)? Or maybe Christians are just getting too political? I don't know the answer, I just know the opposition does not make sense.
     
  9. Timsings

    Timsings
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2006
    Messages:
    585
    Likes Received:
    0

    Preach it, Brother!

    Tim Reynolds
     

Share This Page

Loading...