Goodbye, Pluto?

Discussion in '2006 Archive' started by Joshua Rhodes, Aug 24, 2006.

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  1. Joshua Rhodes

    Joshua Rhodes
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  2. EdSutton

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    Hope someone remembers to tell all this to Pluto, Ceres, 'Xena', Triton, Charon, the Moon, et. al.. They probably would be interested to know it. :rolleyes:

    Oh yeah, as one who memorized a list of nine, from the sun outward, over 40 years ago, I might still suffer a relapse, 'scientific opinion' notwithstanding.

    Ed
     
    #2 EdSutton, Aug 24, 2006
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  3. StefanM

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    Remembering the 8 is going to be much easier than the 500 or so we'd otherwise have gotten around to naming :).
     
  4. TheWinDork

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    [​IMG]

    Poor guy!

    :tear:
     
  5. Alcott

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    Yeah. Dog gone.
     
  6. donnA

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    Lets see, it has satellites and revolves around the sun. What more do you want to call it a planet.
     
  7. Bob Farnaby

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    Obviously was nevera planet.. I know, I listen to Holst's 'Planets' regularly .. only 8 movements, and Pluto isn't one of them. Just shows the musician knew more than the astronemers

    Regards
    Bob
     
  8. Joshua Rhodes

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    Hahaha! Yeah, Holst's "The Planets" is outstanding!
     
  9. Scarlett O.

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    Well, I for one am bummed out. Pluto was by far a class favorite of my students when I used to teach earth science. When we would make our solar system projects.....everyone wanted to be assigned Pluto.

    It does have some weird features, folks, that, if it remained at planet status would cause it to always be the "odd man out". I think that's why my junior high school students loved it so much.....Pluto was a born rebel!! :laugh:

    It's very small. Pluto and its moon, Charon, if they were two-dimensional, could both fit on a map of the United States, with room to spare. They are other objects in our solar system much bigger than Pluto and that revolve around the sun that are not planets.....comets, asteriods.....

    Charon, Pluto's moon, does not rotate around Pluto. They rotate around each other. They should be called a binary system. Even a binary planet system, some say, because Charon is over one-half the size of Pluto....another unusual feature.

    Charon is the only moon in the solar system that rotates in the opposite direction as its planet.

    All of the planets beyond Mars are gas giants. They are too far from the sun to have had their masses burnt to a crisp. Pluto is not gaseous nor a giant. It's just a little chunk of rock covered in ice.

    Pluto's orbit around the sun is out of whack from the other planets. It crosses Neptunes orbit every 200+ years or so. In fact, I may have the dates wrong, but I believe that from somewhere around 1989-1999, Neptune was the outer most planet.

    So, it's an odd little "planet". Always has been. And now it's been stripped of its stripes! :laugh:

    I expect a rebellion of epic proportions from school children everywhere!!:smilewinkgrin:
     
  10. Revmitchell

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    does this mean our science is improving?:laugh:
     
  11. Debby in Philly

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    I wonder what the astrologers out there will have to say about this? That all of a sudden Pluto in your chart doesn't quite matter as much as before? Just shows how much "science" that is.
     
  12. Magnetic Poles

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    That is the nature of science...new discovery expands our knowledge. However, in this case, it is less science and more semantics and definition.
     
  13. Revmitchell

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    The nature of science is that the latest and greatest thing proves that the last latest greatest thing wasnt ever so great or in fact correct. What will we think of Pluto in 20 years.
     
  14. Magnetic Poles

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    The scientific method is the best tool we have for new discovery and knowledge. Science has no dogmas, it assumes nothing. It makes hypothesis, tests them, and if new evidence arises that sheds new light on old ideas, they are revised or eliminated; rather than being clung to because they are sacrosanct.

    Ptolemaic views of the cosmos were replaced by Copernican views as new evidence and ideas were proven. Newtonian concepts that work well on smaller scales are enhanced by Einstein's view of the Universe.

    This self-correcting quality of the scientific method is its greatest strength. It would be stupid to hold to discredited theories in the light of newly discovered evidence.

    But again, the reclassification of Pluto, Ceres and Xena to the new category of "Dwarf Planet" is just that...reclassification, not new discovery. It doesn't change anything about the nature of Pluto or Charon.
     
  15. Daisy

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    Size and a regular, more rounder orbit, I think. Its satellite is almost as big as itself.

    Is this going to affect astrology, you think? *** darn, Debby beat me! ***
     
  16. Revmitchell

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    I certainly cannot argue with that. I see the effects of gravity and the effects of seasonal changes and I say there is something you can reley on. I see things like this, the redefining of planets and I think, just how reliable is science. In so many cases its not proven facts but just theories. The problem that concerns me is that these theories are expressed as fact unless you really press those who put forth these theories. Science is unreliable not because of the science itself but because of how it is presented.
     
  17. Daisy

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    Theories explain facts - facts are the "what" while theories are the "how". As awareness of the facts change and accumulate, the theories explaining them change.

    Philosophy & religion are the "why".
     
  18. Revmitchell

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    Im getting dizzy.
     
  19. The Galatian

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    Actually, this is just formalizing what scientists had known for many years. Naturally, the popular press gets it garbled a bit, and then we get the "I don't like daylight savings time, because the extra sun ruins my cabbage." kinds of arguments from the yahoos.
     
  20. Scarlett O.

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    :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
     
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