Greatest pitcher ever dies

Discussion in 'Sports' started by JackRUS, Feb 10, 2007.

  1. JackRUS

    JackRUS
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    Want to guess who he was?

    Hints: He threw 930 no-hitters, 238 perfect games and struck out 141,517 batters. In a nationally televised exhibition against major leaguers at Dodger Stadium in 1964, he struck out Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Maury Wills, Harmon Killebrew, Roberto Clemente and Brooks Robinson in order.

    He is...
     
  2. Ed Edwards

    Ed Edwards
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    I'm not even going to feign I know the answer to this question.
     
  3. El_Guero

    El_Guero
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    So who was he?

    ;)

     
  4. EdSutton

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    I dunno', if I'm sure, but it sure sounds like he was the King of all pitchers! :thumbsup:

    Batter: "Uh- say Ump! Doncha' think that last pitch sounded low?" :laugh:

    Ed
     
    #4 EdSutton, Feb 10, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 10, 2007
  5. Bob Alkire

    Bob Alkire
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    I saw him a few times in the 60's. And his first baseman could hit, I believe his name was Jackson.
     
  6. faithgirl46

    faithgirl46
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    Hank Bauer Unless I am mistaken
     
  7. EdSutton

    EdSutton
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    The late Hank Bauer was an all-star outfielder with the NY Yankees, and later KC, and managed the A's two different times and the Baltimore Orioles. He managed the O's to the World Series title in 1966. He actually was pressed into emergency service as a catcher one time in 1955, and was the factor in the Yanks losing the game on a passed ball. But he was not ever a pitcher, to my knowledge. But good guess. Try again.

    Court dismissed! :D

    Ed
     
  8. EdSutton

    EdSutton
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    I saw him a few times on TV, but was never fortunate enough to see him in person, to my detriment. He was a great showman, and usually batted with a kid's bat the was only two feet long, and he could hit with it, as well.

    Ed
     
    #8 EdSutton, Feb 11, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 11, 2007
  9. Carolina Baptist

    Carolina Baptist
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    Did anyone notice that this is a link to the news story?
     
  10. JackRUS

    JackRUS
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    By now you'll all notice that I purposely didn't say "baseball pitcher", but just "pitcher". I had a feeling that would throw some people off.

    If anyone can come up with a pitcher that was more dominant than the Eddie Feigner I would like to know who that was.

    I like the name of his team though. The King and His Court. It kinda reminds me the only true winning team in the universe doesn't it? :thumbs:
     
  11. faithgirl46

    faithgirl46
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    I Haven't heard of this guy.
     
  12. JackRUS

    JackRUS
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  13. Tom Butler

    Tom Butler
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    I met Eddie Feigner back in the early 1970s when he came to Paducah, Kentucky to play a team of local stars.

    I was covering his appearance for the local TV station and I asked him what to expect.

    He told me to start out right behind the umpire and catcher, shooting film over their shoulders. "Don't worry about getting hit by a foul tip," Eddie said. "There won't be any fouls. They have to hit it to foul it."

    He also said that if anybody did get on (a rarity), he would pick them off first base on the first pitch. When a local batter did get on, I moved to first base, and rolled the camera. He went into this whirlwind windup and suddenly the ball was coming to first out of nowhere. The runner, who couldn't even leave the base until the pitch left Eddie's hands, expected the pitch to go to the late and left. As he saw the pitch coming his way, he was frozen--and of course, out.

    He also pitched from second base. Same results. Feigner's team had only five players: Eddie, the catcher, first baseman, another infielder and an outfielder. The fielders didn't have much to do, but all of them could hit a ton.

    Eddie Feigner was truly the King.
     
  14. Timsings

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    I watched him on Wide World of Sports once. He also pitched blindfolded. One of the fielders came in to retrieve the catcher's throws and hand him the ball. He also told him the location of the previous pitch. Ostensibly, he was there to protect Eddie from batted balls, but, as you said, that never happened. I wish I could have seen him in person.

    Tim Reynolds
     

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