Hardshell Primitive Baptists

Discussion in 'Baptist History' started by ChuckLDJ, Mar 22, 2010.

  1. ChuckLDJ

    ChuckLDJ
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2010
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm trying to find some info on a group of Hardshell Primitive Baptists in southeast Georgia that split from "mainstream" Primitive Baptists.

    This group holds services in old unpainted wood church buildings without any electricity. Their bathrooms at the churches are outhouses. Their water at the church comes from old handpumps. Their homes do have electricity, but they do not have TV or radio. They don't use or listen to any musical instruments even outside of church. They don't recognize Daylight Savings Time.

    I'm curious as to when the split from the "mainstream" Primitive Baptists took place and how wide spread that they are. Also, since they do not approve of TV or radio I'm curious about their stance on computers.

    Any information beyond the above is also much appreciated.
     
  2. Jerome

    Jerome
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2006
    Messages:
    5,603
    Likes Received:
    44
  3. pinoybaptist

    pinoybaptist
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2002
    Messages:
    8,123
    Likes Received:
    1
    I have had my own lessons in going to singings other than those organized by Primitive Baptists.
    We went to one in Rochester, NY.
    People who were there were mostly Mennonites, all whites, from all over the State.
    We were the only obviously non-American born brown skins.
    Thinking these were Christians of different stripes we felt at home, my wife immediately went to the Alto group, a long row of seats occupied by prim and proper white ladies, and I sat down at the tenor group row and just started to sing along with everybody.
    I look up and there was my wife sitting where she originally sat, dead center in the row, only this time she was sitting all alone, all the "Christian" white ladies had gone elsewhere or moved to the front rows, no one having the "Christian" civility to at least invite her with them since she was an obvious stranger.
    I stood up and got her and we walked out.
    I am simply sharing our experiences and not trying to start anything that may be construed as racist, only that I sympathize more with the Hardshells who cautioned the Lees (in Jerome's link) to not join with any singing other than those they have already been raised in since the people in these singings come to the singings because they (1) were raised in it (2) like the tempo and the melody, or (3) reasons other than spiritual, and when the third reason is considered........
     
  4. Timsings

    Timsings
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2006
    Messages:
    585
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have been attending Sacred Harp singings for over 40 years, and this is the first time I have heard of this kind of situation, even in the South. I don't know what to say except to apologize on behalf of every singer I know.

    I have sung with the Lees mentioned in the article, and I have heard second-hand accounts of what they experienced. It is true that in the last 25 years or so many new singers have come to the singings for other than religious reasons. Some are agnostic or atheist and view the singing as a kind of folk music. There are even Jews who participate. But in my experience, religion, politics, race, culture, all the things that separate people from each other, are set aside at these singings. Anyone who is willing to come sit in the square and learn to sing the shapes and the music is welcomed with open arms.

    Tim Reynolds
     
  5. pinoybaptist

    pinoybaptist
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2002
    Messages:
    8,123
    Likes Received:
    1
    No, this did not happen in the South. It happened up North, where one would hardly expect such things to happen.
    As a matter of fact, I have been to some parts of the South and have always been treated with respect by most white folks I've met, in church or out of.


    That singing I went to were by majority, if I understood correctly, Mennonites.
    Atheists singing praise songs in shape notes ?
    Lol.
    That's something else.
    Maybe so, but if I knew there was an atheist singing "oh, for a heavenly breeze" in a singing I will probably leave.
    It's kinda like, to me, watching an uncouth rapper singing a gospel song, while a practicing uncouth rapper, or a m-word f-word dropping action star playing Jesus Christ or God in a play or movie, and I don't care if he drops those words because it's what the scriptwriter said he should say.
    Hey, no offense to you, brother, you probably been singing shapes for your entire life.
    I was just introduced to this wonderful style of singing thru the Primitive Baptists.
     
  6. ChuckLDJ

    ChuckLDJ
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2010
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    My deceased grandfather was a pastor (or elder) in the Alabaha Primitive Baptist Association. Unfortunately when he was alive I didn't have the interest in Baptist history that I now have.

    I've stumbled across references to the book by John G. Crowley before in my seaches. I keep threatening to purchase it. Other than his book it has been tough finding any information on the group.

    If my dad remembers correctly sometime after this particular hardshell group broke away from what I call mainstream Primitive Baptists they split again into the "Crawfordites" and "Bennettites". Of course dad says that they have split several times since then. He says that he remembers them once splitting over whether Sunday was the first day of the week or the last day of the week.

    I think their membership now is rather small and a lot of the churches have closed. I do have photos of about 3 of the churches.
     
  7. pinoybaptist

    pinoybaptist
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2002
    Messages:
    8,123
    Likes Received:
    1
    Our pastor was in Alabama, I don't know where, this past Sunday for a singing, with one of our members who now lives in Florida.
    Sacred Harp singing is really beautiful, it is.
    Especially when you got good bass voices in there.
     
  8. Jerome

    Jerome
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2006
    Messages:
    5,603
    Likes Received:
    44
    Why would those who reject musical instruments sing out of a book entitled "The Sacred Harp"?
     
  9. ChuckLDJ

    ChuckLDJ
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2010
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't understand why they do a lot of what they do. That's one of the reason that I try to find out more about them.
     
  10. rsr

    rsr
    Expand Collapse
    <b> 7,000 posts club</b>
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2001
    Messages:
    10,071
    Likes Received:
    101

    http://fasola.org/
     

Share This Page

Loading...