HCSB > nKJV in Titus 2:13

Discussion in '2004 Archive' started by Ed Edwards, May 23, 2004.

  1. Ed Edwards

    Ed Edwards
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    Titus 2:13 (HCSB):

    while we wait for the blessed hope and the appearing
    of the glory of our great God and Savior, Jesus Christ.

    Titus 2:13 (nKJV):

    looking for the blessed hope and glorious appearing
    of our great God and Savior Jesus Christ,

    IMHO the HCSB is stronger here than the nKJV
    in regard to the unity of God and
    or blessed Savior, Jesus, the Christ.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. DeafPosttrib

    DeafPosttrib
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    Ed,

    What is HCSB?

    What is your point of Titus 2:13?

    Our blessed hope does not separate from the glorious appearing. We are looking forward for Christs' glorious appearing, and our body shall be all changed into immortality that what our blessed hope shall be at Christ's coming - Titus 1:2; 2:13; and 3:7.

    In Christ
    Rev. 22:20 - Amen!
     
  3. Watchman

    Watchman
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    I'm not Ed, but it's the:
    Holman Christian Standard Bible.

    As for this verse: no matter the version, the thought is the same: we are to look for the appearance of the Lord Jesus Christ.

    What a day!
     
  4. Ed Edwards

    Ed Edwards
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    Amen, Brother Watchman - Preach it! [​IMG]

    In the nKJV there are two understandings of the "and"
    seperating "great God" and "Savior Jesus Christ:

    1. The "and" joins two similar sets: "great God"
    and "Savior Jesus Christ".

    2. The "and" joins two equal sets: "great God"
    and "Savior Jesus Christ". That is: "great God"
    is the same exact as "Savior Jesus Christ".

    In the HCSB = Holman Christian Standard Bible, there is
    no doubt: the "great God" and "Savior"
    are both equal sets and both are "Jesus Christ"
    for the comma makes "Jesus Christ the same as
    "great God and Savior".

    Thus the HCSB is stronger on the deity of Jesus
    than is the nKJV.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Ed Edwards

    Ed Edwards
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    The HCSB &gt; nKJV in Titus 3:5!

    Titus 3:5 (nKJV):

    not by works of righteousness
    which we have
    done, but according to His mercy He saved
    us, through the washing of regeneration
    and renewing of the Holy Spirit,

    Titus 3:5 (HSCB):

    He saved us-- not by works of righteousness
    that we had
    done, but according to His mercy,
    through the washing of regeneration
    and renewal by the Holy Spirit.

    Both these readings can be understood
    correctly that the Holy Spirit renews
    us. But the nKJV can also be misunderstood
    to mean that we renew the Holy Spirit.
    (I wouldn't believe it, save it was
    mentioned to me). The Holy Spirit renews
    us, we don't enhanse the Holy Spirit.

    The HCSB is less likely to
    be misunderstood there than the
    nKJV. The HCSB is &gt; (greater than)
    the nKJV in Titus 3:5.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Daniel David

    Daniel David
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    The difference is something called the granville sharp rule in the greek language. It is something the not-so-smart KJV translators were either ignorant of, or purposely didn't use to weaken the doctrine of Christ's diety.
     
  7. Ed Edwards

    Ed Edwards
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    You lost me here Daniel David.

    I found an interesting definition at:

    Alpha & Omega Ministries

    //Basically, Granville Sharp's rule states that when you have two nouns, which are not proper names (such as Cephas, or Paul, or Timothy), which are describing a person, and the two nouns are connected by the word "and," and the first noun has the article ("the") while the second does not, both nouns are referring to the same person. In our texts, this is demonstrated by the words "God" and "Savior" at Titus 2:13 and 2 Peter 1:1. "God" has the article, it is followed by the word for "and," and the word "Savior" does not have the article. Hence, both nouns are being applied to the same person, Jesus Christ. This rule is exceptionless. One must argue solely on theological grounds against these passages.//

    So i don't know what you said.
    If in humor, please use a smilie ;)
     

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