How did you select the Bible you use?

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by Thermodynamics, Feb 1, 2009.

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  1. Thermodynamics

    Thermodynamics
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    I am interested in how you went about deciding which translation of the Bible to use. Beyond that what lead you to buy the specific edition of that Bible (page layout, study helps, cover material et cetera).

    In posting this I do realize two things:

    1. Many people use more than one Bible.
    2. Many people are passionate about the specific Bible they use.

    I would like to avoid an AV vs. MV debate in this thread.
     
  2. annsni

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    For many years, I used the NIV as my regular Bible because that's just what everyone around me used. I still have my NIVs (yeah - multiple ones because the covers went on a few of them) but when the ESV came out, I started looking at that version. I really liked it and because of it's more literal approach to translation, I moved over to the ESV. But I do still read my NIV - I keep it by my bed at night to just "read".

    The regular ESV I have and use daily is just a plain old ESV with the references in the middle of the two columns. It's a smallish Bible - like the thinline ones which makes it really easy to carry and even just shove in my purse when I'm carrying lots of things.

    I'm really tempted to get myself the ESV study Bible but I'm still not making the move yet. DH has it in our living room where I do my quiet time so I can just reach and grab that from him. If he ends up taking it to church and leaving it there, then maybe I'll get my own. I really like the study notes in there but it's certainly too big for me to carry around with me daily.

    In addition, I have a KJV, NKJV, NASB and Living Bible here at my computer, and then I also like to use some other versions online to see meanings and just how someone else translated a particular verse.
     
  3. mcdirector

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    The NASB was the Bible I moved to as a teenager. I still use it.

    The NIV I used when I was writing for Lifeway (or the KJV if that curriculum depended on that version instead). For years, I took an NIV to church because that's what the pastor preached from.

    Now I carry an ESV to church. I have a pocket version in Tru-Tone which I carry most of the time. The current pastor preaches from this version.

    Recently I got a TNIV because it was so highly recommended by a couple of the members that I respect. I'm working my way through it and I like it, but I still pick up the NASB when I need to find something.

    I have a NLT in a Chronological Bible - the Chronological rendering of Scripture is why I got that one. I read it on a very regular basis.

    I've got others, some are duplicates but were gifts so I keep them. I got an NIV every year I went to a writers conference and only kept the KJV/NIV parallel.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    BTW, you'd be amazed at how many Bibles people give to the Media Center. I put those on a giveaway rack and they do get taken.
     
  4. Deacon

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    I like a vanilla flavored Bible.
    • Lots of white space on the page for personal notes.
    • I don't want a heavy Bible.
    • I want it plain, no study notes (but textual notes are nice)
    • I really like big print, in fact that's vitally important to me. I want to be able to digest it without using my reading glases
    • No red lettering
    I vary my translation choice every few years to keep on my toes.
    Every version has advantages and disadvantages, places where you like it and other places where you find it lacking.

    Recently I've been using the NRSV XL and like it a lot
    (very few nuts in it so far)

    Rob
     
    #4 Deacon, Feb 1, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 1, 2009
  5. TCGreek

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    For me, I look for both accuracy and readability. I've found both in the TNIV.
     
  6. Mexdeaf

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    After many years of using the KJV the Lord called us to the mission field and we used the Reina-Valera 1960. When we were led back to the states to pastor just recently, I did some reading of different translations and and after praying about the matter, I felt led to use the ESV as my main study/preaching Bible.

    However, in my preaching I may also quote from two or three different versions- i.e. whichever one that seems to express the meaning of the underlying Greek or Hebrew with clarity in common English.
     
  7. webdog

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    I choose a different translation to read through each year that I use as my "primary" Bible for that year. This year it is the ESV. Next year will be new updated HCSB Apologetics Study Bible, the year after the TNIV. Then Christ will return (that will be 2012) :D
     
  8. preachinjesus

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    I choose my primary teaching translation through a couple of qualifying steps:
    1. How does the translation remain faithful to the text?
    2. How much explaining of the English am I going to have to do?
    3. How will the translation communicate with my audience?
    4. I have a particular cadence when I talk, how does the English work with that cadence?
    5. Does the translation communicate well to hearers who might be using other translations?

    Recently I switched over from the NKJV to the HCSB. These steps were all part of that process. I almost switched over the NET and had some serious thought (and still do) about the ESV.

    As for a personal Bible I try to use the translation I teach from as a primary text. Of course most times when I am attending somewhere or listening to someone I will not have a physical copy of the Scriptures but will carry my tablet or smart phone both which have multiple translations on them.

    As for devotional reading, I will change versions (as led) every year to keep things fresh. Of course I always use Greek and/or Hebrew in my personal devotions. :)

    Great thread:thumbsup:
     
  9. RustySword

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    This may sound really strange, but...

    I was Roman Catholic in the pre-Vatican II era (i.e., Latin Mass). At that time, the Scripture readings, when they were in English (and they usually were), were from the Douay-Rheims translation, which has all the "thees" and "thous" like the KJV.

    When I became a Christian in 1973 and started going to Bible studies, I would hear people using the KJV (although the NASB was more popular at the time) and would say to myself, "Now THAT'S the way the Bible is SUPPOSED to sound!" So, I started using the KJV, and have stuck with it for daily reading.

    I never intended to collect Bibles, but that's what I seem to have done. If I had to pick a "daily reader" out of all the ones I have, it would be my Oxford Reference Bible, which I like because it has a good cross-reference system but no notes, so it is really clean and clear.

    As I get older, I may be switching to the Giant Print edition that I bought for my children to read to me many, many years ago...

    I have study Bibles from many different theological perspectives. I find it more convenient to combine my Bible reading with my "comparitive theology" studies. I have, for example, the 1917 and 1967 editions of the Scofield, the New Geneva Bible (Reformed), the Wesley Study Bible (Wesleyan/Arminian...duh...), the Dakes Reference Bible (haven't quite figured that one out completly yet), Companion Study Bible (leans toward the mid-Acts Dispensational viewpoint, from what I've seen and heard), KJV Study Bible (Dispensational), NKJV Study Bible (Dispensational, moderately Calvinist), the Catholic Study Bible (NAB), an edition of the Douay-Rheims that has some notes, an LDS (i.e., Mormon) "Quad," and probably a bunch of others that I just can't remember right now...

    OK, so I don't get out much...
     
  10. tinytim

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    I always used the KJV. And when I quote the Bible from memory, it is KJV...

    But I use others for other reasons..

    NLT for devotions.. (Although I have found myself drawn to my TNIV lately)
    NKJV, ESV, NASB, KJV for deep theological studies...

    But I used the TNIV this morning for the sermon.

    Actually, I have been using the TNIV more than others lately..

    It may be a fad!!!!
     
  11. Rippon

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    Not a mere fad -- it's habit-forming!
     
  12. Keith M

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    I'm also reading through the ESV this year. But as for 2012...

     
  13. Keith M

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    Back when I had a lot more hair on my head than I have now, I switched over to the NASB. Eventually I switched to the NKJV. This year I'm reading through the ESV, but my preferred translation is still the NKJV.

    In years past (but not so much these days as money is more of an issue) I purchased many study Bibles for their notes. I believe my favorite of the study Bibles is the Ryrie Study Bible which I have in the KJV, the NIV, the NASB, the NASB95 and the NKJV (yeah, that's right - at one time you could get a Ryrie Study Bible NKJV. Too bad Moody discontinued the Ryrie in this translation.)

    My preference is for more literal translations such as those I've mentioned. I occasionally refer to a dynamic equivalence translation such as the NIV or TNIV (I'm not extremely fond of the gender inclusiveness of the TNIV). I try to avoid paraphrases like the original Living Bible and The Message altogether.

    I have more bonded leather Bibles than anything else, with hardback editions a close second. I have a few paperback Bibles, but these I don't use extensively. The paperback editions were mainly purchased back in the '70s and early '80s for the variety of translations. That was before we could find so many different Bible translations available online.
     
  14. franklinmonroe

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    This is essentially the issue that originally brought me to the BB Versions/Translations forum. I was researching my next new Bible. My previous Bibles had been gifts given to me; I had virtually no input into those. Most were KJVs, but I had received one NASB'71. I had not given it much thought before these were wearing out.

    I discovered that the English Bible has been translated into hundreds of texts. I wanted to examine as many of those translations as I could. Some I might find good and proper, others I might determine as inferior or heretical; but at least I would know to what previous readers had been exposed. I have acquired over 100 texts in print of the English Bible; so far, I've read about 10% of them. Every one of one of those Bibles are second-hand (most were under $10).

    I have three nice leather-bound Bibles I randomly choose to carry to church: a KJV, a NET, and a NASB'95. The church I attend preaches and teaches out of the KJV for the purpose of unity. The last several years I have been reading mostly from parallel format Bibles: I'm concurrently reading the NT of Tyndale, Great, Geneva, and Bishops'; the second half of 2008 it was the NT of the ESV, TNIV, HCSB, and NLT.

    Due to the many years I sat under the KJV text (reading, preachers, teachers, memorization) it is the most familiar to me, but I wouldn't call the KJV the version of my choosing, nor would I say that I have settled on any other as a favorite text.
     
  15. Rippon

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    Keith, when will you ever learn?The NIV/TNIV cannot be described as dynamic-equivalent.They are at the center between the more formally-equivalent and functionally-equivalent approaches.The TNIV ventures even a bit further toward the formal side.

    If you want to mention fully dynamic versions discuss the TEV,CEV,NCV and such.Even the NLTse is not as dynamic as you apparently think the NIV is.

    As far as the so-called gender inclusiveness of the TNIV goes you need to review past threads on the issue.The ESV,CSB,NLTse and NET Bible (among others)all use generic language when warranted.The differences between the aforementioned and the TNIV on this issue is marginal.Most of the time I see that the TNIV is made out to be some other species rather than a difference in degree.That just shows an ill-informed understanding.
     
  16. TCGreek

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    A person has two options on the TNIV:

    1. Either dismiss it because of what others have said about it without ever investigating the matter.

    2. Or take the time to learn this whole translation project. When a person does so, they'll find that the TNIV is a great choice as a primary Bible.

    Rippon has nailed it with the degree of difference regarding the gender-issue. :thumbsup:
     
    #16 TCGreek, Feb 2, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 2, 2009
  17. John Toppass

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    I am just curious. Did you ever figure out which translation/version made loose the hair?:laugh:
     
  18. Rippon

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    Maybe Nehemiah got a hold of him!
     
  19. robycop3

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    I generally use the NKJV, KJV, NASV, & NIV for witnessing, as more people are at least somewhat familiar with those versions; I study in the AV1611, Geneva, Bishop's, Tyndale, & Wycliffe versions. God willing, i might delve into the ESV & HCSB this year!
     
  20. Ehud

    Ehud
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    A.v.kjb

    The A.V. KJB Why? this might shock most
    Holy Spirit Conviction:laugh:

    Ehud
    Because thou hast kept the word of my patience, I also will keep thee from the hour of temptation, which shall come upon all the world, to try them that dwell upon the earth. Revelation 3:10
     
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