How Different?

Discussion in 'Pastoral Ministries' started by Tom Bryant, Sep 29, 2011.

  1. Tom Bryant

    Tom Bryant
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    On Monday mornings and Thursday mornings I always go back over my notes for the sermon and/or Bible study from the day before. One of the things that I've noticed is that the actual presentation is different from what I had planned to say. The points from Scripture are almost always the same, but how they are applied and the illustrations I've planned are often different from the sermon preached.

    Is it the same for other pastors? I understand that the holy Spirit leads us - hopefully - to say what we are saying about His Word, but it seems lately that it is very different.

    I know His leadership in a sermon is not in any way even in the same ball park as the inspiration of Scripture, but I was wondering how different does the Holy Spirit lead you in your prep time than in the preaching time?
     
  2. Ruiz

    Ruiz
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    Depends!

    Most people when they prepare a sermon, they prepare a gameplan. Gameplans are good but they are not designed as a speech.

    When I competed in speaking and today when I coach and evaluate speakers, I notice those who prepared a game plan and those who prepared a speech. Preparing a speech is much harder than preparing a game plan as they take much more into account. Now, better speakers or those speaking a while often prepare a game plan and modify it to speech style as they give the speech. The same goes for lectures. This has its place in some circles, but has its disadvantages as well.

    When coaching speakers, I often want them to prepare speeches and work hard to go from being a game plan organizer to a speech preparer.

    Yet, when I preach, my outline is often a game plan because there is just too much work to make it into a speech outline (My sermons are 45 minutes to over an hour). Thus, I tend to eliminate/add elements during a sermon. However, if I am speaking 20 minutes or less, I am a speech preparer and my speech or lesson will change less.
     
    #2 Ruiz, Sep 29, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 29, 2011
  3. Tom Bryant

    Tom Bryant
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    Your point about time limit is excellent. Less time does mean more prep and a more concise speaking style.
     

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