Hunters

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by agedman, Oct 27, 2013.

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  1. agedman

    agedman
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    I have a good friend who is in the midst of hunting (bow season).

    He and I were totaling up the cost to bring down a single deer, and found that by the time he paid the fees, the feeder, the feed, the blind, the "game clothes," the equipment, the time off work, the lease fees, the food for camp, processing of the kill(s), and on it goes - he could buy groceries for nearly six months and meat for the year. Remember, we were not discussing just bow season, but the whole hunting season.

    Also, that the expenditures are made whether a kill is realized or not.

    The questions are:

    1) Is hunting wise stewardship of the funds God grants?

    2) Should "wild" game be put into specific "parks" in which a "hunter" can cut expenses, satisfy the urge to kill, and have the meat processed?

    3) Does God endorse hunting for sport when food can be purchased?

    4) Is there specific Scriptures to address any of the above questions?
     
  2. HungryInherit

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    If you have to lease land to hunt then hopefully you can more than enough afford it. I hunt with dogs, but don't deer hunt and I don't have to pay to lease land. I don't have any urge to kill anything. I don't know of there isany scriptural support of it or not, but I know a lot of places stock game an as you probably know you have to be drawn for it.
     
  3. annsni

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    Are hunters going hunting just to save money and put food on the table? Or is it a pasttime that they love and it brings joy and satisfaction to their heart?

    I ride horses and let me just say it's not free. Just my riding boots cost $350 and those are not at all top of the line ones. I just paid $75 to have the zipper repaired on one. But when I'm at the barn, I'm satisfied. I find peace, contentment and joy working with Whirl.

    Then there is my hubby and HIS hobby. A 42 foot sailboat. Nuff said.

    God told the Israelites to buy what made their hearts glad. I believe that prudent spending on things that bring us joy is not a bad thing. If you are causing your family to suffer in doing it then yes, it's not a good idea. But otherwise? Enjoy!
     
  4. Revmitchell

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    I ride horse and I already have boots so there is no cost there. But keeping them in hay is a whole other deal and it can get expensive.

    Hunting can be expensive or it does not have to be. It all depends on what the hunter wants to invest in.

    If either one is not made a priority over God then it is all good.
     
  5. HungryInherit

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    I thought you were tougher than that. I figured you for a mule man, rev. :smilewinkgrin:
     
  6. padredurand

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    Talking about poor stewardship.... 65,000 deer get killed by cars every year in New York. Average price of a new car is $31, 252.00. $2,031,380,000 in destroyed cars and little to show for it.

    Roadkill is not a good harvest program for deer. The meat gets all bruised. Add the wrecked cars and no meat to show for it makes that $2.50 I spent for the bullet looks like a good bargain.

    Unless your buddy's an idiot I doubt he replaces his gear every year. So you can't count that expense. Hunting over a feeder is like bear hunting at the zoo so cut out the feed costs.

    Wasn't that long ago if you didn't hunt you didn't eat. Shoot, wasn't that long ago folk knew milk came from cows and not Piggly Wiggly.
     
  7. Revmitchell

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    I have looked at one which was a bit more than 16hh. but you can't rope off of them and I decided to go with the TB.
     
  8. annsni

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    What-chu talkin' 'bout Willis????

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Revmitchell

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    Hehe that is extremely rare. And at my age the ground is much, much harder than it used to be. Oh...and so is the fence.
     
  10. annsni

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    Tell me about it!! Right now I'm off riding until I have a sure diagnosis but it looks like I have a stress fracture in my foot. No riding until further notice!! I will hopefully have an MRI this week and then may be in a cast! :(
     
  11. HungryInherit

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    Haha, look at that. I prefer mules for trail riding as IMO they are much more sure footed than a horse. But, I've seen more mules for free "if you can catch em" than horses. On the other hand, I've seen men that wouldn't take a blank check for a good mule. When you get a good one, you will want to bury him in your yard.
     
  12. Revmitchell

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    Yea that is why I looked at some.
     
  13. JohnDeereFan

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    I already own the land. I have a homemade stand. All I do for feed is to fill up a couple of buckets with apples and peaches that aren't any good to eat, anyway.

    About the only thing I pay for is coffee.

    I believe so.

    No. I strongly object to managed hunts.

    As far as I can tell, yes. And what's the moral difference between shooting a deer and buying a processed cow? The deer has a lot better quality of life than the cow. Is God only concerned with which animal is killed? Or is He concerned with how humanely the animal is treated?

    None that I can think of.
     
  14. JohnDeereFan

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    You can usually save a little money if you lease by offering to kill varmints.
     
  15. Bro. James

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    Scripture says God killed an animal to get skins to cover up man's nakedness. What happened to the dead meat is not readily apparent. Before The Fall, man was an herbivore. Man still has the gut of an herbivore--a long intestine for processing veggies. Man's gut does not do well with putrified meat.

    Paul says it is O.K to eat meat sacrificed to idols provided it does not cause a brother to stumble. Then there are Kosher hotdogs-- w/o pork of course. We used to eat horse meat--not sure about mules. Most of our domesticated animals do not retire of old age. Trigger did wind up stuffed.

    The killing of animals for food and/or sport is an interesting conundrum. Some apparently enjoy "the hunt"; some seem to enjoy "the kill". Some both. Then there is humane killing--certainly not found in slaughter houses.

    There is a transferable vital force in live plants and animals. We seem to do pretty well as omnivores. We have processed most of the good stuff out of our food in the interest of shelf life.

    Now what? Some people have survived into their nineties on peanut butter and white biscuits. Go figure.

    Even so, come, Lord Jesus.

    Bro. James
     
    #15 Bro. James, Oct 28, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 28, 2013
  16. Aaron

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    One should learn to make a distinction between hunting and foraging. For the purposes of this post, hunting is a regulated sport or pastime wherein one kills for fun (regardless of whether or not he eats his game). Foraging is the search for food.

    Killing for fun is inhumane and unchristian.

    Foraging is a god-given, unalienable right.
     
  17. kfinks

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    I hunt on federal land with a used tree stand and bow or on land which I help manage in trade for permission to hunt, using a old russian surplus rifle. I use natural plantings such as honeysuckle, oak trees, and clover. I process my own meat.
    Even at this level, the meat is more expensive than what I can buy. However, it is organic and of much higher quality. I also get to enjoy being outdoors and working with my hands in a stress free environment in the summer and fall, and then reap rewards when the seasons open.
     
  18. thisnumbersdisconnected

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    In Genesis we read that animals were created for the benefit of man. Adam was given the pleasure of naming them, and they were there for his enjoyment, help, and later as a source of food.

    At the beginning of creation, animals mainly served as helpers and enjoyment and not food because Adam and animals alike were vegetarians (Genesis 1:29-30). Note also that man was to rule over the earth and subdue it. The earth and all that it had were meant to serve the needs of man. It wasn't until after the flood in Genesis 9 that meat became a source of food for both animals and man. Since the animals and the plants of the earth were put under the control of man, God gave the responsibility to man to learn and to use them to his pleasure. That is why using animals in research is acceptable, because they are meant to be used instead of humans. Animals do not have the same form of eternal soul and likely do not experience an afterlife. This does not mean that we can be cruel and intend evil towards them.

    Conservationists would all agree that sport hunting is valuable in keeping the population of some animals in check. There is nothing biblically wrong with it. However, it is also an issue that each person must decide for himself. It is under the liberty of Christians to do it or to not do it. If you do not feel comfortable with sport hunting, then search out why that is and abstain from it.
     
    #18 thisnumbersdisconnected, Oct 28, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 28, 2013
  19. kyredneck

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    Well put. However I don't think there's anything wrong with enjoying the 'thrill of the chase' when 'foraging', whether it be for shrooms, largemouth bass, or whitetail deer.
     
  20. padredurand

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    Where have you been? I've been waiting for this conversation for months. The State of New York regulates hunting by setting season in which one may legally harvest a deer using legal firearm or bow. By regulation, I can only forage for a whitetail deer during a three week period starting mid-November. Last year my deer foraging fed an Amish family for most of the winter and my family of four for most of a year. The same state that regulates my foraging also regulates the sale of venison. To make along story short, if you want to eat venison in NY you must either harvest it yourself or have someone else share theirs. You might have some luck hitting one with your car but that's messy.

    The side benefit of my God-given, unalienable right to forage is that I enjoy the process of foraging. I harvested a nice doe at 170 yards. One shot and a clean kill. The buck I harvested was taken from about 65 yards. The last thing that went through his mind was 140 grain Spitzer traveling at 2300 feet per second. Sounds easy enough until you actually try to do it. I'm sure it's much more difficult navigating the parking lot at Kroger's trying to put food on the table but I'm equally sure there's some folk that enjoy that too.

    We depend on that venison to get through the year just like we depend on the veggies we grow out in the yard. I can buy a tin can of tomatoes cheaper than I can grow them but why shouldn't I do everything possible to provide for my family?
     
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