If you had a Muslim or Jew over for dinner...

Discussion in 'Forum for Polls' started by Johnv, Oct 13, 2009.

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WOuld you change your menu to accommodate a Muslim, Jew, etc?

  1. Yes, it's good manners to make sure the guests' dietary needs are met.

    13 vote(s)
    54.2%
  2. Yes, but it would be in addition to other foods on the table.

    11 vote(s)
    45.8%
  3. No. My house, my menu. Doesn't matter what religion they are.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. I'd accommodate them if they are Christian, but if they're not, they get what I give them.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Johnv

    Johnv
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    If you had a person over for dinner, and their religious beliefs required them to adhere to a particular diet, would you change what you're making to accommodate them?
     
  2. JMSR

    JMSR
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    I encountered this recently when my cousin brough an Iranian girl to family dinner. We had smoked pork loin, and threw a chicken on for her. Worked out fine. She didn't seem to mind and we sure didn't. But to serve only chicken? No. I should say though that it wasn't her religous beliefs, she's not islamic, but her nationality to the best of my knowledge just doesn't eat pork.
     
  3. Johnv

    Johnv
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    Good point. It's often culture, and not religion. Christian in India are often vegeterian. Cristians from the Middle East often refrain from pork products. Messianic Christians observe kosher dietary customs. Seventh Day Adventist Christians are vegeterian.

    I love cooking, and as a matter of politeness, I always try to find out if someone I invite has a particular dietary restriction or preference. I believe that I would not be a good host if I purposefully made food that my guests couldn't eat. It might even be a bad Christian witness.
     
  4. webdog

    webdog
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    I view this the same way as if a diabetic were to have dinner at our home. I would accommodate her...but I wouldn't require my family to also adhere to her dietary needs.
     
  5. Trotter

    Trotter
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    I may not agree with or respect the person's beliefs, but I would not disrespect the person who is my guest.

    By showing the kindness and courtesy of meeting their dietary requirements I will have shown them Christan love and may have won an opportunity to share the gospel.
     
  6. Johnv

    Johnv
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    I concur with Trotter!
     
  7. donnA

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    Generally when someone eats here I try to make sure I do not cook foods they do not like or can not eat, for whatever reason, if I know about it. It's only common curtesy. Has nothing to do with honoring another religion, but serving a guest, and what kind of witness would I be if I cooked foods they couldn't eat just because that was part of a religion.
    Agreeing with Trotter.
    I've never met either here in our rural town, or surrounding areas.
     
  8. annsni

    annsni
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    I will always try to accomodate their food needs whether it's food allergies, food preferences, convictions or religious needs. When my daughter had her graduation party, I knew a number of her friends were vegetarian so I made sure I made them something and not just an aside but a full dish that was great and they were SO appreciative. I don't necessarily agree with their reasons for being vegetarian (some were unsaved from school so they're vegetarians because of the animal rights issues which I disagree with), but it's easy enough for me to throw together my bean and barley burritos with some vegan cheese and then be able to minister to them rather than make them feel unwelcome. Even when I provide a meal for someone, I take into account any special needs the family has. It's just called being courteous.
     
  9. JohnDeereFan

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    Yes.

    1 Cor 9:19-23 - For though I be free from all men, yet have I made myself servant unto all, that I might gain the more. 20 And unto the Jews I became as a Jew, that I might gain the Jews; to them that are under the law, as under the law, that I might gain them that are under the law; 21 To them that are without law, as without law, (being not without law to God, but under the law to Christ,) that I might gain them that are without law. 22 To the weak became I as weak, that I might gain the weak: I am made all things to all men, that I might by all means save some. 23 And this I do for the gospel's sake, that I might be partaker thereof with you.
     
  10. Alcott

    Alcott
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    I have lived in my house 8 years and have had 'dinner guests', I think , 3 times, not including when my brother came over to watch a game and we had pizza or something in front of the television. And none of those had special dietary needs or convictions. So I suppose I don't really know. I would be willing to prepare something with ingredients marked 'kosher' or strictly vegetarian. But if it comes down to the person refusing to eat unless all dairy products are off the table, for instance, I don't know if it's worth it to entertain that person.
     
  11. abcgrad94

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    Same here, Donna.
     
  12. Marcia

    Marcia
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    I voted "yes, but in addition to other foods on the table." Actually, as a vegetarian, I probably would not have to worry about this since there would be no meat at all.

    However, I assumed that I ate meat in order to answer the question fairly. I think one should sincerely accommodate guests this way as a gesture of hospitality.
     
  13. JMSR

    JMSR
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    Why are you a vegetarian, if you don't mind me asking?
     
  14. BigBossman

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    If I had any friends who were Jewish or Muslim & I decided to invite them over for dinner we would have pork chops, bacon, pork rinds, & ham.

    I'm just kidding. :laugh:

    I would have other things available. I might be closed minded, but I'm not cruel. I'm not going to change what I'm eating just because I'm having dinner guests over that don't eat those things.
     
  15. Marcia

    Marcia
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    No, I don't mind at all.

    Originally, I became a vegetarian in the New Age when I believed that everything was sacred and that animals were equal in value to people. I was an animal rights activist and I thought it was wrong to eat animals (I'm allergic to all seafood - shell or otherwise so I don't eat that anyway).

    I also was/am aware of cruel practices in the meat industry and factory farming.

    I lost my taste for meat - when I was saved, I had been a vegetarian for about 14 years. My son was vegetarian from the womb and always the healthiest boy in his class and among his friends. He's a trim 6'4" now and swims almost every day (about 20 laps I think). He tried meat when he was 14 and didn't like it.

    I know it's okay to eat meat biblically, but most people are unaware of some of the cruelty in the meat industry, which I do not think is ethical. I think Christians can make a choice not to eat it based on that (of course, I no longer believe that animals are equal to people - at least most people - :tongue3:). I have no desire to eat it because I've lost my taste for it (the odor of meat cooking is actually somewhat nauseating to me), and I'm aware of some of the cruel practices in getting meat to the table.

    Christian men seem to like to make fun of me for some reason for being vegetarian. I put it down to some kind of defensive reaction.
     
  16. Johnv

    Johnv
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    I have family members who are former Hindu. They never ate meat as part of their religion. Even though they are now Christian, they still refrain from eating meat because it's part of their culture. That's the great thing about Christianity. It doesn't require you to change your whole culture, it just requires the changing of your heart.

    Because the sight of meat is offensive to them, I never have meat products out when they come over.
     
  17. JMSR

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    Thank you and again I hope I wasn't out of line asking. I asked because most people I have encountered that won't eat meat, or some types of meat, do so due to some strange notions about animals and their worth, or its cultural. You're obviously not middle eastern. Though it might have been the reason initially, I understand that it's not now. How fortunate we are to have that choice. I'm glad the Bible doesn't command me to eat cooked carrots.
     
  18. Marcia

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    Aside from cultural vegetarians, most true vegetarians (someone who says they are vegetarian but don't eat red meat or they eat meat now and then are not vegetarians) are that way due to views on animals. So they are usually New Agers and/or hardcore animal rights sympathizers or activists. I knew vegans as well (vegan is no animal products, including honey or wearing leather) and never knew a vegan that was not an animal rights activist.

    No, I'm definitely not middle-eastern or eastern! I'm about 75% English, Irish, and Scotch and 25% Chilean. I was a New Ager and animal rights activist. I was in demonstrations, etc.

    The other thing about being vegetarian is that people assume I am one because I love vegetables, but I only like a few veggies - broccoli, brussel sprouts, and a few others. Actually, the word "vegetarian" comes from vegetare, which in Latin means "life-giving." "Vegetable" also comes from "vegetare" but otherwise, being a vegetarian has nothing to do with eating vegetables. I like pasta!
     
  19. Jim1999

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    Frankly, I think vegetarianism can be as much a cult as Hindu religious practices. God provided animals for sustenance along with other foods. A good balance keeps the body where it should be as much, or better, than any vegetarian diet. So, it really boils down to personal choice.

    I have seen a lot of vegetarians taking huge amounts of supplements; a concoction! A proper diet does not require additional vitamins as such...........then, to each his own.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  20. Marcia

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    I don't take supplements, Jim, nor does my son.

    Actually, the way our teeth and stomach are made are more for being a vegetarian than a meat eater. Carnivores have sharper teeth and can eat meat raw; their intestines are shorter so the meat passes through more quickly. A lot of digestive problems in man come from his long intestines and the meat going through so slowly.

    It makes sense because when God made man, there was no meat eating. So God originally made man not to eat meat. Eating meat came after the Flood and involves death, the result of sin.
     

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