Il Silenzio

Discussion in 'History Forum' started by InTheLight, Feb 11, 2014.

  1. InTheLight

    InTheLight
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    From an email I received:
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    The Silence....

    About six miles from Maastricht, in the Netherlands, lie buried 8,301 American soldiers who died in "Operation Market Garden" in the battles to liberate Holland in the fall and winter of 1944-5. Every one of the men buried in the cemetery, as well as those in the Canadian and British military cemeteries, has been adopted by a Dutch family who mind the grave, decorate it, and keep alive the memory of the soldier they have adopted. It is even the custom to keep a portrait of "their" American soldier in a place of honor in their home. Annually, on "Liberation Day," memorial services are held for "the men who died to liberate Holland." The day concludes with a concert. The final piece is always "Il Silenzio," a memorial piece commissioned by the Dutch and first played in 1965 on the 20th anniversary of Holland's liberation. It has been the concluding piece of the memorial concert ever since.

    This year the soloist was a 13-year-old Dutch girl, Melissa Venema, backed by André Rieu and his orchestra (the Royal Orchestra of the Netherlands). This beautiful concert piece is based upon the original version of taps and was composed by Italian composer Nino Rossi.

    Watch at this site and go full screen. It's very beautiful and moving.

    http://youtu.be/H4l3Rgq-L1M
     
  2. thisnumbersdisconnected

    thisnumbersdisconnected
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    I had to look Melissa Venema up online, her performance moved me so. She is now 18, and is the trumpet soloist at the “Valentijnsconcert” in the “Schouwburg De Lawei” in Drachten (the Netherlands). What captured my attention is her obvious awe of the meaning behind the piece, and her respect for why she is able to stand on stages throughout Europe to perform. If not for those Americans who gave their lives for men and women, and beautiful young ladies, not even born yet, she could not stand. Yet she does, and she honored them with that performance. They would be pleased.
     
  3. just-want-peace

    just-want-peace
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    Absolutely fantastic!!!! Thanks for posting such a jewel.

    It's just a shame that so many in this country have such a negative perspective toward our troops. :mad::confused:
     
  4. ktn4eg

    ktn4eg
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    When I was stationed at USAFE's Ramstein Air Base in what then was called West Germany, the Mission Pastor of the IFB mission where I went to (Landstuhl Baptist Mission---later to be known as Bible Baptist Church of Landstuhl [FYI -- This church wasn't affiliated w/ the BBF.]), visited this US military cemetery.

    It was one of the high points of my time that I spent in that part of Europe (March, 1967 - April, 1969).

    If any of you ever have the opportunity to visit that part of The Netherlands ("Holland"), you ought to try to include a visit to that US military cemetery.

    It's located in that little part of the southeastern region of The Netherlands that juts southward between Belgium (on the west) and Germany (on the east).
     
  5. Melanie

    Melanie
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    It does the country great honour to remember those who gave their lives on their behalf. It makes me feel very humble for our ancestors who defended our nations so very far away.
     

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