In Ukraine, nationalists gain influence - and scrutiny

Discussion in 'Politics' started by poncho, Mar 7, 2014.

  1. poncho

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    Mar 30, 2004
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    (Reuters) - When protest leaders in Ukraine helped oust a president widely seen as corrupt, they became heroes of the barricades. But as they take places in the country's new government, some are facing uncomfortable questions about their own values and associations, not least alleged links to neo-fascist extremists.

    Russia's president Vladimir Putin claims Ukraine has fallen into the hands of far-right fascist groups, and some Western experts have also raised concerns about the influence of extremists. Yet many Ukrainians see the same groups as nationalist stalwarts and defenders of the country's independence.

    Two of the groups under most scrutiny are Svoboda, whose members hold five senior roles in Ukraine's new government including the post of deputy prime minister, and Pravyi Sector (Right Sector), whose leader Dmytro Yarosh is now the country's Deputy Secretary of National Security.

    Right Sector activists wearing black ski masks, bullet-proof vests and military fatigues still hold several buildings close to Kiev's Independence Square. Activists on the street declined to speak to Reuters about their organization. An individual described as their "commander" directed a reporter to two spokespeople who also declined requests for interviews.

    Looks like the corporate media has been forced to comment on the neo fascist take over of Ukraine.

    But they're going about it in a softball kind of way of course. "It's okay the neo fascists promised John McCain they'd be good once they took over the government". :rolleyes:
    #1 poncho, Mar 7, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 7, 2014

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