interesting charts and the one question never asked

Discussion in 'Politics' started by billwald, Jun 29, 2012.

?

are you paid what you are worth

  1. less than I am worth

    1 vote(s)
    25.0%
  2. what I am worth

    3 vote(s)
    75.0%
  3. more than I am worth

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. don't know

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. billwald

    billwald
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  2. InTheLight

    InTheLight
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  3. targus

    targus
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    If I belonged to a union I would have to say "more than I am worth"...

    Since that is the point of having a union.

    To get paid more than you are worth. :laugh:
     
  4. Winman

    Winman
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    Interesting charts, but I don't understand how they relate to a person's monetary worth in society.

    A person is worth the value they add to society. Bill Gates is worth a lot of money because he developed the personal computer that hundreds of millions of people use and make our life better.

    I remember reading about Mark McGuire about 15 years ago. Folks complain that professional athletes make much more than they are worth. But it was a proven statistic that when Mark McGuire came to town, attendance was up at ball games over 10,000 people, even visitor parks. Folks hoped to see Mark clobber a 500 foot home run. So, he was worth money to the league and the parks he played, he brought in millions of extra dollars income.

    I am speaking only of dollars here, but a person is worth what value he adds to society.
     
  5. ktn4eg

    ktn4eg
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    The only real "union benefit" I ever had was to be out of work for 6 months back in the 1970's when I worked for a union-controlled company in PA. (Back then you had to be a union member if you wanted to work where I did.)

    Walking the picket line for 3 months during the PA winter was just an added benefit.

    Unless you quit your job (which many had to), no other place would hire you full time. "So you said you work at Leeds & Northrup? [That was my company's name.] Tell you what.....We'll get back to you."

    The vote to strike was not a secret ballot, and while we may have gained some questionable concessions, what we gained had already been lost by being out of work for half a year.

    To add insult to injury, while on strike, the company farmed its work out to other union-controlled firms. So much for the concept that "brother unions" honoring our strike.

    After we returned from the strike, I was still laid off. Moreover, it wasn't too long after I left PA to move to TN that our company eventually went out of business.

    Union-controlled companies......Gotta love 'em!! :tear::tear:
     
  6. Winman

    Winman
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    Yes, I worked for one union back in the early 70's, Berol (formally Eagle Pencil) the #1 manufacturer of pencils in the world at that time. I worked in the "Black Lead" department making the actual pencil lead from oil and graphite. It was an extremely dirty job, the graphite would go right through your work uniform and coat your body black. But I was paid well for that time.

    I worked very hard and was producing more lead than either 1st or 3rd shifts (I was on 2nd). My bosses loved me, my fellow workers not so much.

    We started having big layoffs, and my bosses were successful in keeping me on for some time, though they laid off according to seniority.

    Eventually, a very short Portuguese man bid for my job. He was only about 4'8" tall and literally had to stand on a crate to operate the machinery and presses I used. He could not read at all, even his own language, they had to have Portuguese ladies there read his work orders to him. I am not saying anything bad about the man, he was nice and a hard worker. He had been there over 25 years, I had only been there about a year, so he got my job. I produced much more than this man, but in a union seniority is more important than productivity.
     
    #6 Winman, Jun 29, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 29, 2012
  7. AresMan

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    One is paid what one is worth when one applies for a job with full disclosure and the employer accepts.
    One is paid what one is worth when there is no coercion present.

    Any kind of manipulation of free exchange distorts the market and results in some being paid more than they are worth and others less.
     

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