is the Catholic Bible...

Discussion in 'Free-For-All Archives' started by Rakka Rage, May 30, 2003.

  1. Rakka Rage

    Rakka Rage
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    available online somewhere? which version is the "offical" Catholic Bible?

    thanks
     
  2. WPutnam

    WPutnam
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    Try the following link:

    http://www.newadvent.org/bible/

    It in turn, gives links to the Douay-Rheims and dthe NAB (as well as a Protestant bible.)

    The "official" bible of the Catholic Church, as I recall, is the Latin Vulgate of which the Douay-Rheims is a direct English translation of.

    Hope that helps...

    God bless,

    PAX

    Bill+†+


    Et ego dico tibi quia tu es Petrus et super hanc petram
    aedificabo ecclesiam meam et portae inferi non praevalebunt
    adversum eam et tibi dabo claves regni caelorum et quodcumque
    ligaveris super terram erit ligatum in caelis et quodcumque
    solveris super terram erit solutum in caelis.

    (Matt 16:18-19 From the Latin Vulgate)
     
  3. Rakka Rage

    Rakka Rage
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    is the latin vulgate the official catholic bible?

    is there an official english? Douay-Rheims Bible? New American Bible? New Jeurusalem Bible?
     
  4. Ps104_33

    Ps104_33
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    Anything but the King James [​IMG]
     
  5. LaRae

    LaRae
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    There are several English Version Douay Rheims Bibles. I have 2 of them, the only difference is one has commentary (study bible).


    LaRae
     
  6. MikeS

    MikeS
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    The New American Bible (NAB) is the version that the Lectionary uses, but many people consider the Revised Standard Version (RSV) to be the best and most beautiful modern translation. Both are officially recognized as suitable, as well as, I think, the New Jerusalem version.

    The NAB is at usccb.org, and a google search for "rsv bible" will produce sites for the RSV.
     
  7. MikeS

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    The New American Bible (NAB) is the version that the Lectionary uses, but many people consider the Revised Standard Version (RSV) to be the best and most beautiful modern translation. Both are officially recognized as suitable, as well as, I think, the New Jerusalem version.

    The NAB is at usccb.org, and a google search for "rsv bible" will produce sites for the RSV.
    </font>[/QUOTE]I wasn't clear enough -- the Catholic version of the RSV is a little different from the original version (a word changed, or a phrase added here or there). The Catholic version is called the Revised Standard Version, Catholic Edition (RSV-CE)
     
  8. Haruo

    Haruo
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    The New American Bible (NAB) is the version that the Lectionary uses, but many people consider the Revised Standard Version (RSV) to be the best and most beautiful modern translation. Both are officially recognized as suitable, as well as, I think, the New Jerusalem version.

    The NAB is at usccb.org, and a google search for "rsv bible" will produce sites for the RSV.
    </font>[/QUOTE]While the NAB is the English-language lectionary version for the United States, I'm not sure that this holds outside the US; the bishops of, say, the UK, Canada, Ireland, South Africa, New Zealand, Australia, or even smaller anglophone jurisdictions like Jamaica, may have their own preferences, or in the absence of a national consensus individual bishops may have promulgated instructions on the subject (for their particular dioceses), or it may be a matter of parochial choice.

    As for the RSV, the edition would have to contain the Deuterocanonicals (aka Protestant Apocrypha) in order to pass muster as a Catholic Bible. RSVs with Deuterocanonicals are available, but not very common, in my experience. I think the University of Virginia has an online RSV w/ Apoc, in fact it's a parallel edition with KJV also w/ Apoc on facing frames. Will try to locate the link.

    Haruo
     
  9. Haruo

    Haruo
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  10. Haruo

    Haruo
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  11. MikeS

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    The New American Bible (NAB) is the version that the Lectionary uses, but many people consider the Revised Standard Version (RSV) to be the best and most beautiful modern translation. Both are officially recognized as suitable, as well as, I think, the New Jerusalem version.

    The NAB is at usccb.org, and a google search for "rsv bible" will produce sites for the RSV.
    </font>[/QUOTE]While the NAB is the English-language lectionary version for the United States, I'm not sure that this holds outside the US; the bishops of, say, the UK, Canada, Ireland, South Africa, New Zealand, Australia, or even smaller anglophone jurisdictions like Jamaica, may have their own preferences, or in the absence of a national consensus individual bishops may have promulgated instructions on the subject (for their particular dioceses), or it may be a matter of parochial choice.
    </font>[/QUOTE]Yes, I still occasionally slip and forget, even after 10+ years, that the Internet isn't limited to the boundries of the US! :D

    The RSV-CE version that I mentioned in my second post does, of course, have the Deuterocanonicals. What is interesting is that, as listed in my Oxford RSV, the Deuterocanonicals are not exactly the same as the Apocrypha. If anybody is interested I can look up the differences.
     

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