Is the King James Bible Without Error?

Discussion in 'Other Christian Denominations' started by Jerry Shugart, Dec 19, 2011.

  1. Jerry Shugart

    Jerry Shugart
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    Why did the translators of the King James Bible add the following words in "bold"?:

    "Now the first day [of the feast] of unleavened bread the disciples came to Jesus, saying unto him, Where wilt thou that we prepare for thee to eat the passover?" (Mt.26:17; KJV).

    If this translation is righjt then we must believe that it was the first day of the feast of unleavened bread but at the same time the passover lamb had not yet been eaten!

    Of course the passover lamb was eaten PROR to the first day of the feast of unleavened bread:

    "In the fourteenth day of the first month at even is the LORD's passover. And on the fifteenth day of the same month is the feast of unleavened bread unto the LORD: seven days ye must eat unleavened bread" (Lev.23:4-5).

    The passover was eaten on the 14th day of the month and the first day of the feast of unleavened bread did not begin until the 15th day. Here is the correct translation:

    "Now on the first day of Unleavened Bread the disciples came to Jesus and asked, "Where do You want us to prepare for You to eat the Passover?" (Mt.26:17; NASB).
     
  2. glfredrick

    glfredrick
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    No... (And I have to add this because my answer is too succinct for this forum.)
     
  3. Thorwald

    Thorwald
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    The annual celebration of the passover by The Israelites, is commanded by God. I am certain, that how it was carried out, was governed by a learned Rabbi. It does not affect my belief in God. It shouldn't affect yours either. :jesus:
     
    #3 Thorwald, Dec 19, 2011
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  4. Jerry Shugart

    Jerry Shugart
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    Of course the fact that the KJV contains obvious translation errors does not affect my faith in any way.
     
  5. Winman

    Winman
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    I don't think it is error, the Jews ate unleavened bread from the 14th to the 21st, that is 8 days. Scholars have debated over Jesus's last week before being crucified, so I doubt I will solve this, but this is how I believe it went down. (Remember all days begin at sunset 6 PM approx.)

    Sunday the 10th- Jesus enters Jerusalem, Palm Sunday.
    Monday the 11th
    Tuesday the 12th
    Wednesday the 13th- Just before sunset, the disciples find the room "prepared" (Mark 14:1, 12-15). This was the "day of preparation", when all leaven was removed.
    Thursday the 14th- Passover, last supper eaten with unleavened bread. Jesus is crucified that afternoon, buried before sunset, first "day" in grave.
    Friday the 15th- first night in grave, second day in grave. This day was holy, a "high Sabbath", not normal Sabbath (Exo 12:16-17).
    Saturday the 16th- normal Sabbath, second night in grave, third day in grave.
    Sunday the 17th- third night in grave, Jesus rises before sunrise.

    I could be wrong on this, scholars have debated this for centuries, but it seems to fit.
     
    #5 Winman, Dec 19, 2011
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  6. Gup20

    Gup20
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  7. Jerry Shugart

    Jerry Shugart
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    No, the technical beginning of the feast of unleavened bread was the 15th day of the month:

    "And on the fifteenth day of the same month is the feast of unleavened bread unto the LORD: seven days ye must eat unleavened bread" (Lev.23:5).

    The word "passover" is used to describe the meal which was eaten on the 14th day of the month:

    "And thus shall ye eat it; with your loins girded, your shoes on your feet, and your staff in your hand; and ye shall eat it in haste: it is the LORD's passover" (Ex.12:11).

    Again, the first day of the feast of unleavened bread was the 15th and the passover was on the 14th:

    "And in the fourteenth day of the first month is the passover of the LORD" (Num.28:16).
     
  8. Jerry Shugart

    Jerry Shugart
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    Then explain how the first day of the "feast of unleavened bread" could have possibly started at a time prior to preparation of the passover. That is what the following mis-translation teaches:

    "Now the first day [of the feast] of unleavened bread the disciples came to Jesus, saying unto him, Where wilt thou that we prepare for thee to eat the passover?" (Mt.26:17; KJV).

    The passover was on the 14th day of the month:

    "And in the fourteenth day of the first month is the passover of the LORD" (Num.28:16).

    The first day of the feast was on the 15th:

    "And on the fifteenth day of the same month is the feast of unleavened bread unto the LORD: seven days ye must eat unleavened bread" (Lev.23:5).

    According to the mis-translation the things which actually take place on the 14th had not yet taken place even though the things which take place on the 15th were already happening.
     

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