Is this correct?

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by rlvaughn, Oct 1, 2006.

  1. rlvaughn

    rlvaughn
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    "In the book of Acts, we find mentioned by name the authors of the New Testament canon (with the exception of Luke and Jude) and the recipients of the New Testament epistles (with the exception of Colosse and Philemon)."

    Is this correct?
     
  2. rlvaughn

    rlvaughn
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    Bump up so maybe someone will notice the question. (Probably should have used a catchier title :laugh: )
     
  3. Humblesmith

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    I'm working from memory here, but as I recall there are nine authors of the NT. I think you mentioned the two exceptions..........but I'm not remembering Matthew being mentioned.

    Is your question asking whether the authors names are mentioned at all, or are you implying that mentioning their names is some sort of approval of their writing? Or is this just a trivia question?

    Too bad it doesn't tell us who wrote Hebrews.
     
  4. rlvaughn

    rlvaughn
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    I think you are right -- nine known authors and ten if Paul did not write Hebrews.

    Yes, just asking about the names being mentioned. I have been working from memory also and haven't taken the time to look at it closely -- just wondering if someone knew offhand. Matthew is mentioned in Acts 1:13. A Jude or Judas is mentioned there also, but I've always thought the author of the New Testament book of Jude was Jude the half-brother of Jesus.

    What about the recipients of the letters? any thoughts there? I think if we look at the 7 churches of Asia as recipients of John's letter called Revelation, we would have some more not mentioned in Acts, if my memory isn't off.
     
  5. EdSutton

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    Actually, Scripture may well give us some insight, here, but it is not 'conclusive'. And in fact, Scripture does not make any claim for the four commonly accepted authors of the Gospels, Acts, or any of the Johannine letters, in addition to Hebrews. There is one thing, however. Hebrews was apparently written by a "Second Generation" believer (Heb. 2:3-4 cp. Gal.1:10-18), and one very familiar with Judaism, probably himself a Jew, and one who is very familiar with the OT Scriptures. (I assume it was a 'him'. :rolleyes:) Luke was a Gentile, seemingly, Polycarp would have also been Gentile, one would think, and only Clement or Barnabas, among others, might come to my mind, save for who I think actually wrote it. As Barnabas has already passed from the scene of the NT, apparently, as well as seems to be 'first generation', I tend to discount him, as well. So I'm realistically left with one good suggestion. Hint!! It's found in Acts 18.

    Ed
     
    #5 EdSutton, Oct 5, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 5, 2006
  6. EdSutton

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    I also tend to agree as to the author of Jude, but it is not outside the realm of possibility that this is referring to Jude Thaddeus Lebbaus, for he to is said to be "of James". I agree that certain of the seven churches in Revelation are probably not mentioned in Acts, but have not done any in-depth study, for that.

    Ed
     
  7. EdSutton

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    I think you may have miscounted authors. Even given my penchant for claiming Apollos as the author of Hebrews, I only come up with a total of nine: Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, Paul, Apollos, James, Peter, and Jude.

    Ed
     
  8. rlvaughn

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    Brother Ed, I think you are right. :eek: I believe I counted John twice, once for the gospel and again for the epistles. You are right -- eight generally agreed upon and nine total authors if someone other than Paul wrote Hebrews. Thanks.
     

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