January - Reading 24

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Brother Adam, Jan 23, 2002.

  1. Brother Adam

    Brother Adam
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  2. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Everyone please note that there is a commentary from Helen from yesterdays readings of the 23rd, well, the 22nd, well, yesterday's readings.

    Good evening all -

    Genesis 49 - "The Blessing of Jacob" is the longest poem in all of Genesis. In this scripture, Jacob is not only prophesying the course his son's lives will follow but that of their descendants as well. Notice that Judah and Joseph receive the longest references. Joseph, the princely son, is the favorite son of the favorite wife, and Judah is the direct ancestor of David and eventually Christ. Judah's blessing is considered a messianic prophecy.
    The chapter ends with the death of the final Patriarch. Just as Abraham and Sarah, and Isaac and Rebekah were buried in Canaan, so too Jacob asks to be buried with Leah in the field Abraham purchased from the Hittitites. Somehow, I feel happy for Leah. She finally won in the end...

    In Matthew 9:27 - 38, The scripture speaks well without commentary but do notice that in verse 34, the Pharisees are already beginning to state charges of demonic affiliations. It appears that Jesus lets it go this time but he will directly confront these charges in Mark 3: 23 - 30.

    Acts 14 shows Paul and Barnabas continuing there ministry in the somewhat distant country of Galatia in what we now know as Turkey. He has begun to double back now and this marks the zenith of his first apostolic journey. This is the shortest of his missionary sojourns, with each trip going further from the Holy Land, spreading Christianity in concentric rings throughout the Roman empire and the known world.
    A quick aside here: I don't know if any of you ever read Beowulf before. It is considered the oldest known manuscript in the English language, though we would certainly not recognize it as English now. Beowulf was written before the tenth century about a Scandinavian warrior. If you read this epic poem you find it peppered with clues of Christianity. Somehow or other, word of mouth had proceded from Paul's journeys into the pagan Anglican lands. Some scholars disagree with this assertion. The argument goes something like this: "What is Christian about Beowulf?" and the retort is, "What is NOT Christian about Beowulf?" I am supplying a link to this poem. It is not the easiest reading and it is not Biblical, but if one reads with an open mind, I think they can see where my assertions rest. Beowulf

    Goodnight to all and may God bless you

    - Clint

    [ January 24, 2002: Message edited by: Clint Kritzer ]

    [ January 24, 2002: Message edited by: Clint Kritzer ]
     
  3. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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