July - Reading 13

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Clint Kritzer, Jul 13, 2002.

  1. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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  2. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Good evening –

    The reading of 2Chronicles commences with the story of God’s offer to Solomon in a dream for whatever he asks. Obviously Solomon had some where-withal to begin with to ask for wisdom and God is obviously pleased with the answer he received. Chapter 2 goes into the beginnings of the building of the Temple. This story is a parallel to the story of the construction of the Tent and Tabernacle that we find in Exodus 31. Solomon corresponds to Bezalel and Huram-Abi equates to Oholiab, the two men responsible for the construction of the Tabernacle. The similarities do not end there. In 1Kings 7:14 we are told that Huram-Abi is descendant from Naphtali while the Chronicler gives her a lineage from Dan. These can both be accurate if the woman either lived in Naphtali while being descendant from Dan, or if her parents were from the two different tribes. What the Chronicler has done, however, is ascribed the same lineage to both Oholiab and Huram-Abi.
    The Chronicler has also omitted from his passages that Hiram instigated the correspondence between Solomon and King Hiram and the initial letter contains more of the theology involved in the reasoning for the construction of the Temple.

    We also have some more information unique to Luke in our reading tonight: the sending out of the 72. The instruction received by these messengers is similar to that of the Disciples when they had been sent out in pairs. They reflect that the message was earnest in that they were not to stop to speak to anyone. We also see that Christ did not want them seeking status in their lodgings but were rather to stay in whatever home received them first.

    In Thessalonians I like verse two where Paul refers to Timothy as a “fellow worker in spreading the Gospel of Christ.” This is the designation I have for all of the regular posters here on the BB and for those in my church. Christianity is easy to attain but once we have accepted that call, there is a great deal of responsibility that goes along with it. If it was enough to just be a Christian, all we would have in the New Testament is the four Gospels. It is NOT enough! After our proclamation of faith we are to struggle to bring about God’s purpose. The Thessalonians had gone through their trials as well as we see in verse 4. Paul tells them that it was expected. This passage definitely speaks across the chasm of time right to us.

    May God bless you

    - Clint
     
  3. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Sunday School lesson 11/7/04 – continued

    Luke 10:1-16 Instructions to the Seventy

    The use of the term "Lord" in verses 1 and 2 of this chapter underline the authority that Jesus had over his disciples. The number "70" (or 72 in some manuscripts) likely has symbolic significance relating to the Gentile nations in Genesis 10. The sending in pairs, or by twos, is also a possible reference to the number of witnesses required in Deuteronomy 19:15 to substantiate a case in law.

    The3 reference to the harvest in this Passage is a figure for the coming Kingdom of God referring to both saving and judging. The harvest is initiated and determined by a sovereign God but this does not negate the need for laborers. These laborers are the heralds who announce the harvest and call others to decision. Even these laborers are provided by God demonstrating that in no way is the harvest dependent on human effort except to beseech God that He send forth more heralds.

    The disciples were going out as sheep among wolves, exposed to and vulnerable to the violence and rejection to which Jesus was also vulnerable. They were to travel without provisions, just as the Twelve had been sent in chapter 9. They were to not even have provisions for their next meal but rather were to trust in God to supply their needs. The command to not greet anyone on the road is believed to refer to the long oriental greetings that were the custom of the time. Such greetings would require too much time and the message being sent was one of urgency. Instead, they were to greet those at their destinations with the ancient greeting of "peace" or literally, "shalom." Historically this had been a wish for the other's well-being. In this instance, however, it took on a new meaning of peace for the messianic age and becomes synonymous with salvation.

    The "son of peace" spoken of in verse 6 is one who is awaiting the consolation of Israel and can therefore be expected to welcome a herald of the kingdom. If the hearer rejects the greeting for peace, however, his hostility will be evidence that he is not a son of peace. In such a case the peace, or the messianic salvation, is thought to return to those from whom it went out.

    The seventy were instructed to no have a sense of guilt about receiving hospitality from those with whom they lodged. Instead they were to accept the hospitality and support of those who received the message of the kingdom of God. They were also relieved of dietary laws as they are told to eat what is put before them. This was a very revolutionary concept for missions conducted by Jews.

    The seventy were authorized to heal in the name of Christ and deliver with those healings the message that the kingdom was near them. In Lukan thought, the kingdom was manifested in the Person of Jesus and by receiving the message of salvation they were being brought near to this manifestation. The message was being brought to them to embrace or reject.

    Should the hearers reject the message, the seventy are told to shake the dust from their sandals, just as the twelve had been instructed. Again, this was a sign that this town was considered heathen territory. Sodom was considered the epitome of evil from Old Testament days but they never had the opportunity to have the kingdom brought near to them. Hence, the judgment on the towns who rejected the seventy would be far harsher than even on Sodom.

    Likewise, Chorazin, Capernaum, and Bethsaida, three Galilean cities had already rejected the message being heralded by the seventy and had brought future judgment on themselves. Tyre and Sidon were Gentile cities from Old Testament times looked at as the centers of idolatry. Jezebel was a princess from Sidon before her marriage to Ahab. Even these towns would have repented had they seen the miracles performed by Christ. The hard heartedness of the northern Jews prevented them from being responsive to Jesus and thus sealed their fates.
     
  4. Clint Kritzer

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