July - Reading 15

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Clint Kritzer, Jul 15, 2002.

  1. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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  2. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Good evening –

    In 2Chronicles this evening we read Solomon’s address to the people at the dedication of the Temple and then his prayer. This passage closely follows 1Kings 8 with just a few discrepancies. The prayer fits well into the Chronicler’s theme of forgiveness from God after repentance. The amazing thing is that all of the favors that he asks in his prayer are covered in the Torah. Verses 6:22 – 23 can be referenced to Exodus 22:10 and Leviticus 6:3-5. Verses 24-25 can be associated with Leviticus 26:17 & 23, Deuteronomy 28:25, 36-37. Verses 26-27 go back to Leviticus 26:19, etc. This is significant for the original audience of the Chronicles in that the Jewish nation had gone so long without the Law before them. There is a very moving passage in Nehemiah 7:73 –8:18 where Ezra reads the Law to the people and we are told that they actually weep when they hear the words (Nehemiah 8:9). The Israelites had lost more than just their liberty in the exile. Even generations before that they had lost their way. As we read through this Book, I keep trying to imagine the reaction of the audience when they hear these words and prayers for the first time. It must have been quite a revelation..

    In Luke today we read the physicians account of the parable of the Good Samaritan. The one thing I picked up on in this reading is that the expert in the law questioning Christ about salvation feels that he needs to justify such a question. He had asked a child like question and received an appropriate response. His pride would not allow the matter to drop, however, as he was an “expert.” Therefore he says in a paraphrased way, “But what does that all mean? Because of his pride in the asking, we get the definition of “neighbor” from our Savior. Christ turns the question back on the man and says in a paraphrased way, “You tell ME who the neighbor is.” Jesus was brilliant at this type of mental maneuvering.

    In 1Thessalonians Paul addresses the issue of sexual promiscuity or immorality and urges the people in the church at Thessalonica to show self-control as is befitting the elect of God. As I had stated at the beginning of this Book back on the 10th, Thessalonica was the largest city in all of Macedonia. It was a very busy urban area with a high volume of traffic from travelling merchants and traders. The temptations must have been great on these people. Paul’s rebuke is very mild on this Body of believers and he immediately follows up with praise for their love of each other. The Greek is “philadelphia” : a word that when used outside of the New Testament means “mutual love of children of the same father” but without exception in the New Testament means “love of fellow believers of Christ.” Paul had already begun a New Testament jargon.

    May God bless you

    - Clint
     
  3. mr. messy

    mr. messy
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    I like the presentation of the Scriptures from BibleGateway.com Thank you for your comments on the Scripture. Do you make comments about the readings from Psalms sometimes? Please understand this is the first day that I have used this Bible reading. Thanks for reading, Mr Messy
     
  4. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Hello, mr. messy, and welcome to the forum. [​IMG]

    To date I personally have made no commentary of note on any of the Psalms. Others have at random points as the felt moved to do so. Helen talked quite a bit about the early chapters during the January and February readings.

    Please feel free to add your thoughts or observations at any point. We're glad to have you here.
     
  5. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Sunday School lesson 11/7/04 – continued

    Luke 10:25-37 The Lawyer's Question and the Parable of the Good Samaritan

    The term "lawyer" in this Passage is synonymous with "scribe." The purpose of the lawyer was to attempt to show Jesus as inept in theological discussion. He therefore asks Jesus, addressing Him as "Teacher," what should he do to inherit eternal life. Jesus answers his question with a question: what is written in the law? The lawyer correctly summarizes the law by quoting Deuteronomy 6:4-5, love God, and Leviticus 19:18, love your neighbor. Jesus tells the lawyer that he is correct.

    Now the Lawyer is in a somewhat embarrassing situation. He has asked a question to which he already knew the answer. Not to be made a fool, the lawyer quickly counters with a request that Jesus define the term "neighbor." Indeed, the question of "who is my neighbor" was, and is, a legitimate question. Our own definition of neighbor may vary. My neighbor may be your enemy. For the Jews in general, their neighbor was other Jews. For the scribes and Pharisees, the circle narrowed even more to exclude sinners and tax collectors.

    Jesus answers the question with a parable. The first character introduced is a man. We are given no more identifying information than this. He may have been Gentile, Jewish, Heathen, Pagan, etc. All we know is that the poor soul has fallen victim to evil.

    The second character we meet is a priest. The setting of the story is on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho and we can assume that this priest was on his way to or from the temple at which he had served God. He had fulfilled the first summary statement of the law: he had loved God. Now when he sees this poor victim of evil he fails to fulfill the second part of the law. He does not love the man. Being a religious man he fears that the man may be dead and if he touches him he will be defiled, preventing him from fulfilling his religious duties. Even if the man is not dead, he may be a sinner, or a tax collector, or even a Samaritan. In the face of his doubts, the priest chooses inaction as the best course and avoids the man by going to the other side of the road and continuing on his way.

    Our next character in this drama is a Levite, a descendant of Aaron and a Temple worker, on who loves God. But for the same reasons as the priest, he, too, avoids the poor beaten man.

    Now the fourth character enters the scene. He is one of the race that was hated by the Jews for generations. He is a Samaritan. This example must have shocked and angered the lawyer. However, the story continues that though the priest and Levite had practiced the law only in deference to God, the Samaritan practiced the whole law. The Samaritan "loved" the beaen men. He treated the wounds of the helpless victim. He dressed them. He carried him to an inn. He provided for the man's future needs.

    Now the question is posed to the lawyer, "who proved to be a neighbor?" The lawyer can not even bring himself to use the word Samaritan but responds "the one who showed mercy." The Lawyer would have likely reacted the same way as the priest if the situation had been real. Jesus had set before him an example that shamed him not for being a religious man, but for not acting with the charity his enemy may have shown. The pious Jews had contrived a system in which love of God conflicted with love of man. The corruption of the law was evidenced in this story.

    The final rebuke to the lawyer comes in the instruction: go and do likewise. You, lawyer, go and act as the Samaritan.
     
  6. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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