July - Reading 20

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Clint Kritzer, Jul 20, 2002.

  1. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2001
    Messages:
    7,739
    Likes Received:
    4
  2. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2001
    Messages:
    7,739
    Likes Received:
    4
    Good evening –

    In 1Chronicles chapter 20, we deal with a story that would have been of great interest to the audience of the Chronicler. The returning exiles were facing the same foes as described in this story of Jehoshaphat defeating Moab and Ammon. We will see this when we get to our reading of Nehemiah in verses 2:9, 4:1-9, 6:1-13. You can imagine what a serious morale builder this account must have been and Jehoshaphat’s sincerity in his prayer must have been quite an inspiration. Also in verse 13 we again see the theme of ALL of the people, even the children, standing before God in this appeal.
    In chapter 21 we see the ascension to the throne of the first evil king of Judah. Beginning in verse 12 we see the only mention of Elijah in the Chronicles. This stands in stark contrast to the close and abundant attention shown to this prophet in 1Kings. The accounting of the people refusing to bury Jehoram with the other kings of Judah shows the high disdain the people had for this man.

    In Luke we read the account of the six woes aimed toward the Pharisees and Keepers of the Law. This story holds special significance in that both of these groups held to views that were outside of Scripture. They felt that piety was attained in their own man-made rules that they added to the Laws of Moses and the prophets. The story is 2000 years old but the modern Christian faces this same dilemma today. Certainly one can have personal convictions that they feel are right, but unless these ideas are backed by Scripture, they have absolutely no right to push them on their fellow Christians. The woe in verse 46 could easily be spoken to many extremist of this day.

    In 2Thessalonians we read the second half of Paul’s opening address. Verse 8 is certainly referring to those who have heard the Gospel but refuse to recognize it just as Paul had stated in Galatians 2:8. In verse 10 we run across the cryptic “day” referred to by Paul. Just as in 1Thessalonians 5:2 which refers to the Day of Judgement or the Second Coming. Further in verse 10 Paul confirms that the Judgement spoken of in verses 5-9 do not refer to this audience as they have believed the testimony presented by Paul, Silas, and Timothy and the purpose of their faith is to fulfill God’s Purpose.

    May God bless you

    - Clint
     
  3. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2001
    Messages:
    7,739
    Likes Received:
    4
    Sunday School lesson – 11/14/05 - continued

    Luke 11:37-41 Controversy Over Washing

    Once again Luke presents to us a scenario in which Christ is dining at the house of a Pharisee. The Pharisee is surprised that Jesus does not perform the customary act of ceremonial washing before the meal. This act was a tradition that the Pharisees had developed as a way of cleansing themselves of any defilement they had contracted unaware (Mark 7:3).

    Jesus uses the opportunity to point out to the Pharisee that outward cleansing does not purify the inner man. The Pharisees had a superficial view of sin that resulted in a superficial view of righteousness. They viewed sin as being something that was exterior and could be covered by external acts. Jesus on the other hand taught that sin was rooted in the inner man and required that each individual recognize himself as a sinner.

    Therefore, the solution to sin was to rectify the problems within. In doing so one would attain outward purity as well.

    Luke 11:42-44 Woes on the Pharisees

    The Pharisees were very careful to observe the secondary stipulations of the Mosaic Law. They tithed even the seasonings that were used for eating. They had, however, neglected the more important aspects of the Law (Micah 6:8). Justice represents a concern for the plight of the oppressed. The Love of God, as we have seen demonstrated in the Parable of the Good Samaritan is inseparable from a love for man.

    Instead of observing these more important aspects of the Law, the Pharisees craved the attention they received because of their station in religious circles. Their religion had become legalistic and instead of being rooted in God it had become rooted in pride.

    The reference to unmarked graves stems from the fact that if a Jew came in contact with a grave, he would become defiled without even knowing it. The Pharisees were like these unmarked graves. They defiled their listeners with their inward corruption.

    Luke 11:45-54 Woes on the Lawyers

    Once again, the term "lawyers" in Luke is synonymous with "scribes". These were the religious leaders who were considered expert in interpreting the Torah. These interpretations, however, were often so difficult and so meticulous that those wishing to pursue religious piety were unable to hold to them. The lawyers, on the other hand, made loopholes for themselves when their own interest were at stake.

    The lawyers likewise heralded the prophets of the Old Testament as heroes yet they acted just as their forefathers did to the apostles and prophets of the new age. Abel and Zechariah form chronological brackets of the Old Testament prophets, Zechariah being the last named in 2Chronicles, the last Book of the Hebrew arrangement of Scriptures. In acting in such a manner, they made themselves accountable for all the murders of all the martyrs, past and present.

    The "key of knowledge" in verse 52 refers to the Scriptures and by their corrupt interpretations the Lawyers had led themselves and others away from its intent. The Old Testament had pointed towards the coming of the Kingdom of God in the form of the Person of Jesus Christ. By becoming entangled in their manmade and prideful legalism, the lawyers had blinded themselves.

    At this point in Luke's narrative, the Pharisees and scribes began pressuring Jesus to make some sort of statement that would compromise His influence.
     
  4. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2001
    Messages:
    7,739
    Likes Received:
    4

Share This Page

Loading...