July - Reading 21

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Clint Kritzer, Jul 21, 2002.

  1. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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  2. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Good evening –

    Chapter 22 of 2Chronicles begins with an act of Divine retribution. In verse 21:4 Jehoram had killed his brothers to secure his place on the throne. Tonight in verse 1 of chapter 22 he witnesses the slaughter of his own sons, save one, Ahaziah. The KJV lists Ahaziah as 42 years old when he ascends to the throne but this is probably a copyist error as this would make him two years older than his father (21:20). Modern scholars have accepted the age of 22 to be correct. In verse 22:10 we see the only break in the Davidic line upon the throne. Athaliah came close to wiping out the house of David and if she had succeeded Judah may have come under the realm of the Omri Dynasty in the Northern Kingdom. Of course, God did not allow such a thing being faithful to His promise to David. The coup described in chapter 23 shows the complete disdain that the people had for Athaliah. Chapter 24 shows us that Joash’s reign was Godly during the life of Jehoiada, but after the demise of the priest, he turned toward evil.

    In Luke today we see the instructions from Christ to His disciples concerning the future of the Christian ministry. One has to wonder if they realized the full significance of the words being spoken to them. The Pharisee’s plot to capture and crucify Christ was still in its planning stages and aside from a few incidents with these people, the ministry had been a very enlightening and somewhat peaceful affair.

    2Thessaloniaans is a very interesting read tonight. The “man of lawlessness” or the "man of sin" spoken of by Paul is what we would call in the modern day the antichrist. John tells us in 1John 2:18 of many antichrists but here Paul seems focused on one. We have the reassurance that he will easily be defeated upon Christ’s return. This is a passage that warrants many re-readings.

    May God bless you

    - Clint
     
  3. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Sunday School lesson 11/21/04

    Luke 12

    Chapter 12 begins a sequence of several loosely connected teachings that Christ gives His Disciples and followers that continues into chapter 13. The student should bear in mind that the chapter divisions were a 16th century development in the Bible and the original manuscript is picking up the story from Jesus' latest confrontation with the Pharisees and lawyers (scribes), hence the introductory phrase "in the meantime." As chapter 11 left off, the scribes and Pharisees has begun pressing Him for words that would undermine His ministry. In the first 12 verses of chapter 12, Jesus gives His disciples counsels concerning the persecution that He and they would soon face.

    Luke 12:1-3 Warning Against Hypocrisy

    Leaven as used in the New Testament almost always symbolizes evil, with the exception of Luke 13:21 and its parallel in Matthew 13:33. The significance of leaven is that it is a substance that modifies an entire batch of dough. It moves through the dough and grows and takes root until finally the entire batch is altered. In this instance, the leaven of the Pharisees is named as hypocrisy.

    To the spiritually blind, the Pharisees put up a good front. Their religion formed a mask which they hid behind. That Christ would warn His Disciples about this hypocrisy likely meant that He was cautioning them from falling into the same trap of legalism they had made for themselves. The Pharisees displayed righteousness through outward acts and rites. Likewise, the "good" Christian displays his fruits through deeds such as going to church, giving offerings, etc.

    Despite our show, however, the inner workings of the Christian are eventually brought to light, just as it was in the Pharisees. If our outward acts are not reflecting the inner Christ, eventually we are exposed to the world for what we are. It is not our church going or offerings by which we will be judged by the world, but our integrity, our principles and our character.

    Luke 12:4-7 God's Care in Danger

    The Christian must never make the mistake of believing that the Bible guarantees us physical safety. To the contrary, our faith has been nourished throughout history with the blood of martyrs. The deaths of those who came before us were often gruesome, cruel, and public spectacles. These atrocities have been performed from all sects, by pagans in the modern day, other so-called Christians in the intervening years, but beginning with the Pharisees of New Testament times.

    Seeing the persecutions to come, Jesus instructs His Disciples to not fear those who could only kill the body, but rather to fear Him who could cast the soul into hell. The Greek here for "hell" is "gehenna," coming from the Hebrew for "valley of Hinnom." In the Old Testament, this location was a dump where garbage was burned because it had been a location for human sacrifice during the time of Ahaz (2Chronicles 28:3). By the 2nd century BC the name had become associated with the place of punishment for apostate Jews. It then evolved as the name of the place for punishment for the godless.

    That they would face such persecution, however, should not dissuade the Disciples from their missions, however. To the contrary, the reward which awaited them was far better than the consequences of not remaining steadfast. Since God cared for sparrows, which were considered nearly worthless to Luke's audience, He certainly cares about the fate of His children. God would see to it that they would be safe in their salvation and he would know even the very hairs of their heads (Romans 8:36-39).

    Luke 12:8-12 Confessing Christ Before Men

    Persecution would put the Disciples to the most severe type of test. Jesus here makes sure that they understand the consequences of affirming or denying their relationship to Him. Should they remain faithful to their cause and proclaim Christ even under the threat of the sword or the cross, they could fully expect Christ to be an advocate on the Day of Judgment. If, however, they should fail under the pressure of persecution they could not count on the same protection. In this lesson Christ tells His Disciples the severe demands of the Gospel. When we accept the Grace of God we become subject to our Benefactor. There are times when such servitude costs us even our lives. We are to remain true no matter what the cost. Christ assures the Disciples that at these times the Holy Spirit would direct them in what they said.

    Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit mentioned in verse 10 is more easily understood in its Matthean context (Matthew 12:31-32). The "Son of man" is Jesus in His physical manifestation on earth. The rejection of Him by those of that generation was not the end of the road for those who did not receive the Message. To the contrary, some Jews became a major part of the early church. Rejection of the Holy Spirit, however, is a direct denial and contradiction to the will, works and counsels of God. The Pharisees had done so in spirit when they rejected the healings and exorcisms performed by Christ.

    [ July 21, 2005, 09:25 AM: Message edited by: Clint Kritzer ]
     
  4. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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