June - Reading 3

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Clint Kritzer, Jun 3, 2002.

  1. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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  2. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Good evening –

    Tonight in the Book of 1Kings we read about the preparations for the building of the temple in Jerusalem. These are the types of passages that I really like and through which Margie just has to plod. Chapter 5 is the stuff of which History channel specials are made. It is interesting to me that the initial correspondence letters with Hiram are included in the text. We also see what organization was involved in the establishment of the work crews. This, for me, is a very exciting passage. I hope that it is for you as well.

    In the Gospel of Luke we read tonight about Mary’s visit to Elizabeth and how the baby John leaped within Elizabeth’s womb. What I like about this passage is that it is an old woman and a young woman coming together to share their pregnancy stories and fellowship. Having a pregnant wife right now, I can tell you that these women love to talk to each other anyway, but how much more of a joy it must have been for Mary and Elizabeth. The reading today ends with Mary’s Song, which is very Psalm-like in nature and is referred to in the Latin Vulgate as the Magnificat which means “glorifies.” Tomorrow we read Zecharia’s song which is a prophecy and is known in the Latin Vulgate as the Benedictus, which means “praise be.”

    I really have to say in our reading of Ephesians that my time here on the BB has greatly increased my understanding of these passages. There is a strong vein of Reformist theology in the Book of Ephesians. Also, when we come to verses such as Ephesians 2:9, the word “works has been defined well by our brethren in the other religions forum. Works are not good deeds as James defines them, but rather Paul is speaking of acts of Law such as baptism, communion, soul-winning. These are ordinances that we observe and practice because of obedience to Christ, but make no mistakes. We are saved by grace through faith, not by works. There is nothing that any man can do for you to get you into Heaven. Christ’s work on the cross was sufficient.

    May God bless you

    - Clint
     
  3. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Sunday School Lecture 12/19/04 continued

    Luke 1:39-45 Mary’s Visit to Elizabeth

    This Passage in particular weaves the two accounts of John and Jesus’ parents together. Mary’s response to Gabriel’s revelation concerning Elizabeth is to make the journey to see her. Elizabeth is described as Mary’s cousin by the KJV but the original term is more obscure. We only know that she was a kinswoman. We can also not positively identify the city in which Elizabeth resided as the “hill country” spoken of in verse 39 is a forty-mile region. However, a journey from Galilee to the area surrounding Jerusalem would be a journey of some eighty miles, a very long journey for a young woman travelling alone.

    While we may surmise that the purpose of Mary’s journey was to confirm the pregnancy of Elizabeth, she receives much more upon her arrival. At the sound of her voice, the child in Elizabeth’s womb, John, leaps. Gabriel had told Zechariah that John would be filled with the Holy Spirit even in his mother’s womb (v. 15) and such is demonstrated here. The verb translated “leaped” signifies a movement motivated by joy. Elizabeth is then described as being filled with the Holy Spirit as well, marking that the words that she now speaks are those of a prophetess.

    The point being made here is the superiority of Mary’s pregnancy to Elizabeth’s. The two women stand in contrast. By earthly terms, people would view Elizabeth’s pregnancy as a blessing. She was old and well to do but had not been able to have children, a major social stigma in Biblical times. Mary, on the other hand, was young and unmarried. Though betrothed she was not yet fully married and the neighbors would recognize the shortness of time at the delivery. On spiritual grounds, however, Elizabeth declares Mary blessed and asks how she, one so unworthy, could be visited by the mother of her Lord. Elizabeth’s blessing testifies of her faith and God’s faithfulness.

    Luke 1:46-56 Mary’s Song: The Magnificat

    This Passage, the first of four songs preserved in the first two chapters of Luke, is commonly referred to as the Magnificat, Glorifies, as that is the first word of the song in Latin. The song is peppered with phrases directly form the Old Testament, in particular, Hannah’s prayer in 1Samuel 2:1-10. This shows Mary’s knowledge of Scripture and the quality of the woman selected by God to bear His Son. While Hannah saw the poor being raised to sit with nobles, Mary saw the nobles toppled from their places of power. Mary also recognizes here the role that she is playing in salvation history and marks her own position as blessed.

    After an opening ascription to the greatness of God, Mary states her own personal need for God as He is her “Savior.” This phrase reflects the words of Habakkuk in verse 3:18 of the Book bearing his name. Her “humble state (KJV – low estate)” likely reflects her social position not any humiliation. She recognizes what great things He has done for her. She recognizes His mercy, an attribute of God sometimes overlooked.

    In verse 51, the theme changes from personal blessings made by God to Mary to the blessings of God on Israel in His mighty acts. The hungry of verse 53 can be seen as both the physically hungry and the spiritually hungry. Though verses 51-55 uses past tense verbs, they also move in premonition of the coming Messianic age. Indeed, the climax of the song is the recognition of God’s fidelity “forever.”

    In verse 56, Mary leaves after about three months. We have no way of knowing for sure if this is after John’s birth but we do know that the poor pregnant girl left even more pregnant than when she arrived and returned home; not to Joseph, but probably to her parents who may have had a few questions about her condition.
     
  4. Clint Kritzer

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