June - Reading 6

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Clint Kritzer, Jun 6, 2002.

  1. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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  2. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Good evening -

    In our reading of 1Kings tonight we see God re-iterate to Solomon His faithfullness to the covenants he made with Abraham and Moses. If there is any emphasis to be put on this passage, it is that the blessings of obedience should always overshadow the curses of disobedience. We also see in this chapter that Solomon had to offer up some cities as collateral to Hiram. The costs of the temple and palace may have overextended the budget. As it always seems to go for believers, Solomon receives money in the next chapter. In 2Chronicles 8 we will see Solomon recover these towns.
    We also read of the visit of the Queen of Sheba. Christ will recount this visit in Matthew 12:42 and Luke 11:31 when He informs the Pharisees that there is One who is among them who is wiser than Solomon.
    I also wish to make a small correction to my post on the 1st of this month: it is not 1Kings that will echo 2Samuel, but 1Chronicles. I apologize for any confusion.

    In Luke we read the account of the Birth of Christ, possibly the most well known passage of Scripture ever, next to the 23rd Psalm. As anyone who reads here regularly knows, I have been using my NIV for this reading. This passage just doesn't sound right to me unless it is done in the King James.

    In Ephesians tonight, we read Paul's prayer for the Ephesians. Notice that verse 3:14 picks up on verse 3:1. Paul wrote in such a flow of conciousness, digressing way that careful study is required of the Pauline letters.

    May God bless you

    - Clint
     
  3. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Sunday School lecture 9/12/04

    Luke 2

    Just as in the first chapter of Luke, the words of chapter 2 are so familiar that many of you could probably say them almost verbatim. Even Linus in "A Charlie Brown Christmas" approached the center of the stage during the cartoon's Christmas play and recited the first 14 verses of Luke 2 in the familiar King James rendition. Making commentary on these verses almost feels like I am pointing out features to you in your own back yard.

    With the commentator's feeling duly noted, we will proceed this week to pick out some of the high points in the story and move on to a straight forward reading of the text.

    Luke 2:1-7 The Birth of Jesus Christ

    Luke is the only Gospel writer who correlates Jesus' birth to any outside events in world history. Caesar Augustus ruled Rome from 31 BC to 14 AD. The Jews as a conquered people were exempt from military service but the Empire did use them for the purposes of taxation. God used this pagan emperor and his conquest of the Mediterranean world (to the author, "all the world") to fulfill the prophecy of Micah 5:2.

    Though the concept of Christ being born in a stable is so ingrained into us, it is only the mention of the "manger" twice in this account that give us any clue as to the setting.

    Luke 2:8-14 The Announcement to the Shepherds

    The significance of the shepherds is quite evident in Luke. As Jews, shepherding kept these men from ever attaining ritual purity under Mosaic Law. As such, they were outside the pale of religious piety and were "people of the land."

    Though it has been asserted for many years that the tending of the flocks at night precludes the story from happening in the winter, external sources assert that flocks were kept near the town of Bethlehem for the purpose of Temple sacrifice throughout the year. This is still not conclusive evidence, however, as to the time of year.

    Upon the angel's appearance, the shepherds are told to "not be afraid." Fear was a common reaction to the appearance of angels and these instructions are often the first part of their message. Daniel 10:7-12

    The theme of the universality of God's gracious gift of Christ is seen once again in the proclamation that the good news of great joy would be for "all men." The song that follows the proclamation is the third of the birth narratives and is commonly referred to as the "Gloria in Excelsis Deo" as that is the first words of it in the Latin Vulgate.

    Luke 2:15-20 The Shepherds' Visit

    After seeing the Christ Child, the shepherds become the first evangelists. The people who hear are "amazed", a common reaction of those who hear of an unusual experience. In contrast to the people's amazed reaction, Mary pondered these things in her heart.
     
  4. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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