June - Reading 8

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Clint Kritzer, Jun 8, 2002.

  1. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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  2. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Good evening –

    In our reading in 1Kings tonight, we witnessed the Israelites once again allowing themselves to be led down the wrong path. This time it is by their new king, Rehoboam. This king almost immediately breaks the pact With which the Lord had made him. First we see how Rehoboam refuses to listen to the advice of the elders on his council, but then, even worse, Jeroboam breaks the second Commandment and makes idols of calves for the Israelites to worship. God had established the new kingship for political diversity but Rehoboam took it to the extreme of theocratic diversity.

    In Luke tonight we read the only account that the Gospels offer us of Jesus between childhood and adulthood. There are many things to glean from this account but what always sticks out in my mind is the serious trouble my own son would be in if he tried this same act! From this I believe that the Scriptures teaches that Jesus was not born with absolute knowledge but instead matured and aquired His wisdom as he grew. I would like any further commentary on that analysis.

    May God bless you

    - Clint

    [edited for my atrocious spelling errors! I just can't trust MSWord's spellcheck like I used to!]

    [ June 09, 2002, 10:44 PM: Message edited by: Clint Kritzer ]
     
  3. Helen

    Helen
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    You are right according to the Bible, Clint. I'm too tired to look up the references right now, but I think it is in John that He says He says only what the Father tells Him, and I think it is in Hebrews that we are told that He was made perfect (complete) through obedience through suffering. So yes, he was very human as well as being God. Philippians 2 says He left His godly perogatives in heaven and became as a man, with the strong implication that He was limited, as He had to LEARN obedience!

    So, again, you are right on from what I can see!

    I also encourage people to take the time to read Psalm 119 -- it's magnificently beautiful!

    and, by the way, excellent closing comment on the Kings reading! I never thought of it that way!

    [ June 09, 2002, 01:39 AM: Message edited by: Helen ]
     
  4. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Sunday School lecture 9/12/04 conclusion

    Luke 2:41-52 The Boy Jesus at the Temple

    There were three primary feasts at which the Law required attendance by adult males: Passover, Pentecost, and Tabernacles. As time progressed and the Jewish nation became more disbursed, distance prevented strict adherence to this Law but most Jewish males, accompanied by their families, strove to attend Passover. The age of twelve was significant to Jewish males as this was the year they began preparing to take their place in the religious community the following year. This view still holds in the Jewish community and is the reasoning behind the bar mitzvah.

    After the feast, which was likely extremely crowded, Jesus separated Himself from His parents. The family began traveling home and after a day's journey realized that the Boy was missing. It is at this point in the narrative that we can glimpse a very human element with which we can easily sympathize in the Scriptures. It is easy to imagine the panic that Mary and Joseph likely felt during these three days.

    When they finally found Him, He was in the Temple courts asking questions and giving answers. Again, we see that the teachers were amazed. It is easy for us to read a chiding tone into Mary's words as she addresses her Child. For the third time in this chapter, Joseph is referred to as Jesus' father. Jesus' response, the first “red letters” in the Gospel of Luke, contrasts Mary's implication of Joseph as His Father to God as His Father.

    The final two verses teach us that Jesus' status did not change from this incident. To the contrary, He is described as being obedient to His earthly parents. Verse 52 is borrowed from 1Samuel 2:26. The Scriptures do not lead us to believe that Jesus was born with full maturity as we may otherwise think. He had to grow and develop moral insight (wisdom), physical maturity (stature), and character traits (favor with God and man).
     
  5. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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