KJV 1611?

Discussion in '2005 Archive' started by Woodymdt, May 2, 2005.

  1. Woodymdt

    Woodymdt
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    Good morning,

    I hope someone can offer some help to me this morning. I've seen a lot of references to the KJV bible that is 1611? I'm guessing that is the date that particular bible was printed?

    Could someone please (without a lot of arguing please) explain to me what the significance is in the 1611 bible as compared to other KJV and NKJV versions?

    Thanks.
     
  2. av1611jim

    av1611jim
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    Woody;
    Since no one has replied to you, I will.
    You can go to the versions and translations forum for answers to your questions. But I warn you. You WILL find a lot of arguing. :D

    I am not sure what you are looking for when you ask for the significance between the AV1611 and the "other" KJV or NKJV.

    In HIS service;
    Jim
     
  3. David Michael Harris

    David Michael Harris
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    You could probably Google it, I would go straight to the NKJV if I was you. Try a google search on 'Preface to the New King James version'

    I would recommend the NRSV myself. Great Bible.

    David
     
  4. David J

    David J
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    The 1611 had the Books of the Apocrypha, many marginal notes with alternate readings, calendars, and the Message to the Reader from the 1611 translators.

    You can get a free 1611 from:

    http://www.e-sword.net/bibles.html

    *Please note that I am not trying to start a KJV debate here. The following site has a chart that compares the 1611 to 1769.

    http://members.aol.com/pilgrimpub/revision.htm

    You can compare the 1611 to the 1769. You will find that some words are changed, added, and deleted in the revisions of the 1611 KJV. The e-sword version does not have the marginal notes etc… You can get a reprint of the 1611 for around $35.00 at most Christian bookstores.
     
  5. Woodymdt

    Woodymdt
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    Thank you David. I've not seen that E-sword site yet. That is some interesting stuff I might want to d'load some of their translations.
     
  6. jdcanady

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    To Woodymdt
    You may already know all of this. If you do, please excuse me.

    The King James 1611 translation was commissioned by King James for use in the Church of England. It was completed in 1611. He commissioned many scholars (70?) to translate from the Greek, Latin, and Hebrew. It was widely used in England, and many churches had one large KJV in the church that members could read themselves. Some people consider the King James as the offical bible for the English speaking world.

    The King James has been updated several times to help the language become more modern. As with all languages, English changes over time, and word use varies. For example, you can see in the New King James less use of "Thee" and "Thou", because we just don't speak that way anymore.

    There are also many more manuscripts available today for translation and comparison by the scholars. We also have a better understanding (just because of more scholarly study) of the way the words of the orginal languages (Greek and Hebrew and some Aramaic) were used. Latin was introduced into the Catholic church with Jerome's Latin Vulgate around 400 A.D. Those languages are basically dead today. Modern Hebrew is not the same as biblical Hebrew and so on.

    Modern translations (NIV, NASB, ASV) and others have only come about relatively recently (basically during the 20 century). Many see this development as an assult on the Bible, itself. There are very strong feelings on this issue.
     
  7. Logos1560

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    Yes, 1611 was the date for the first printing of the original edition of the KJV. The KJV was a revision of earlier English Bibles (Tyndale's to Bishops') as well as a translation of the preserved Scriptures in the original languages. There were actually at least two editions of the KJV printed in 1611 with some variations between them. David Norton's book A TEXTUAL HISTORY OF THE KJB lists these variations in appendix 2 (pp. 173-179). Except for the reprint of the 1611 edition available today, most present KJV's are based on the 1769 Oxford edition or later editions with a few differences.

    The NKJV is an updating and revision of the KJV and also a translation of the same underlying texts in the original languages. The differences you find between the KJV and the NKJV are the same-type differences you find between the KJV and the earlier English Bibles of which it was a revision.
     
  8. rsr

    rsr
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    Moving to the Translations forum to get more responses.
     
  9. robycop3

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    The AV 1611 is the original King James Version of the Bible. It contains many things such as the Apocrypha, list of Holy Days, and the translators' preface, "To The Reader", not found in most current KJV editions.

    I would recommend that every serious English-reading student of Scripture obtain a repro copy of the AV 1611. (Originals are scarce & usually cost MEGABUCKS!)
     
  10. Dr. Bob

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    The AV 1611 was translated under authority of James I of England.

    It went through many major and hundreds of minor revisions. Few use it except as reference and those who claim to be "AV1611" churches usually aren't. Most have never even seen one, much less tried to read it!

    The KJV that are most popular today are either the Oxford 1769 or the Cambridge 1762.

    In the 1880's an attempt was made for a TOTAL revision (keeping some words/phrases but more accurately reflecting the revised English language). This was the RSV or Revised Version (British) and a few years later the ASV (American Standard Version of 1901).

    As language continues to evolve in 1982 another TOTAL revision (again, keeping the same Greek text as a base and much of the flow/lilt of the 1611 language) in the NKJV - New King James.

    This final attempt is much clearer to read and no one I've ever met has problems understanding it. I recommend it to new believers and use the NKJV in preaching.
     
  11. Keith M

    Keith M
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    With all due respect, Dr. Bob, I have to differ with you on this. The NT of the Revised Version (RV) was originally published in 1881, with the entire Bible being published in 1885. From this version came the ASV of 1901. The NT of the RSV was not published until 1946, with the OT following in 1952 and the Apocrypha following in 1957 (good year for Chevy). The RSV is actually a revision based on the 1901 ASV.
     

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