KJV and NIV Study Bible by Zondervan

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by Paul1611, Jun 12, 2006.

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  1. Paul1611

    Paul1611
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    Does anyone know if the "study notes" in the KJV Study Bible and the NIV Study Bible are the same? I have a course that is coming up that requires the NIV study notes, but I really prefer the KJV text. But if the notes are different I will need to purchase a NIV Study Bible by Zondervan. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Marcia

    Marcia
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    I am not sure about this, but isn't the KJV Study Bible published by Nelson? If so, I would think the notes would not be the same at all.

    Also, once I looked at a KJV Study Bible briefly at a bookstore and the notes did not look like the NIV study notes.

    But wait for someone else to come along who knows more! :smilewinkgrin:
     
  3. TCassidy

    TCassidy
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    Yes. The NIV notes were added to the KJV text. In my opinion it is the best study bible in print.
     
  4. Marcia

    Marcia
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    I didn't realize there was a KJV Study Bible by Zondervan. Okay I was wrong about that one! :eek:

    I know the NASB Study Bible used the NIV notes, too.
     
  5. Logos1560

    Logos1560
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    The text of the KJV edition in the 2002 Zondervan KJV Study Bible is the 1873 Cambridge edition edited by Scrivener.

    Edward Hills noted: "In the 19th century the most important edition of the King James Version was the Cambridge Paragraph Bible (1873), with F. H. A. Scrivener as its editor" (KJV Defended, p. 217). David Norton indicated that Scrivener was “more conservative” as an editor than Blayney (Textual History, p. 124). He described this edition by Scrivener as “by far the most substantial and responsible work on the text after the work of the translators themselves” (p. 122). W. F. Moulton maintained that "the Cambridge Paragraph Bible, edited by Dr. Scrivener, is the classic edition of the Authorised Version" (History of the English Bible, p. 211). In 1885, P. W. Raidabaugh wrote: “The most accurate edition, in all respects, of the Authorized Version ever published is the one issued from the Cambridge Press in 1873, under the editorship of the Rev. F. H. Scrivener” (History, p. 62). The introduction of the 2001 Strongest Strong's Concordance identified it as "the best modern edition of KJV" (p. x). This introduction noted that "Scrivener was commissioned by Cambridge University Press to create a standardized edition of the KJV to eliminate all of the errors and inconsistencies that had crept into the text" (p. x).


    This 1873 and present KJV edition has "strain out" at Matthew 23:24 instead of "strain at." It has "profession of our hope" at Hebrews 10:23 instead of "profession of our faith." At John 10:25, this 1873 edition has "ye believe not" in agreement with several of the earlier English Bibles while most present KJV's have "ye believed not." At Acts 25:23, it has "were entered" in agreement with several earlier English Bibles while most KJV's have "was entered" following the Bishops' Bible. This 1873 edition has "thy mercy's sake" (Psalm 6:4, 31:16, 44:26) for the Oxford edition's "thy mercies' sake," “fathers‘ house“ for “father‘s house“ (1 Chron. 7:2, Ezra 2:59, Neh. 7:61), “heart’s lust” for “hearts’ lust” (Ps. 81:12), “Adder‘s poison“ for “adders‘ poison“ (Ps. 140:3), “fools‘ back” for “fool‘s back“ (Prov. 26:3), “merchant’s ships” for “merchants’ ships” (Prov. 31:14), “priests‘” for “priest’s” (Ezek. 44:30), “potter’s clay” for “potters’ clay” (Dan. 2:41), and “oaths’ sake” for “oath’s sake” (Matt. 14:9, Mark 6:26). It has “mine hands” for “my hands” (Isa. 65:2) and “mine hand” for “my hand” (Jer. 25:15, Ezek. 6:14).


    The text of this KJV edition is more in agreement with the 1611 edition than are most other present KJV editions. Scrivener presented a list of the places in his 1873 edition that he restored 1611 readings (Authorized Edition, pp. 215-237).
     
  6. LeBuick

    LeBuick
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    My mother had a bible, I forget what flavor it was, but it had study out lines instead of just notes. When I first started preaching, I used those outlines for classes and the "bones" of some sermons. I need to call her and ask what that was.
     
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