Lest we forget!

Discussion in '2005 Archive' started by bruren777, Oct 17, 2005.

  1. bruren777

    bruren777
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    It's not too early to start thinking about after Thanksgiving-after the holiday the Salvation Army Bell ringers will be out.

    True to their modus operandi, Target will ban Salvation Army bell ringers!

    Last year Targets corporate phone number was changed and a new number was unobtainable. I kept searching around and found, with Gods help, the new phone number. The person answering the phone wanted to know how I got it, I said devine intervention. I asked why the Salvation Army bell ringers were banned. She told me that they would have to allow everyone else to be out front of their stores soliciting funds

    I told her all the years the Salvation Army had bell ringers I had never seen anyone else soliciting funds. I advised her I would boycott Target and ask everyone I knew to join me.

    After our friendly conversation I advised everyone in my e-mail addr. book of the phone number. I also e-mailed tv station news rooms with the phone number. I have lost the number, but it's probably been changed anyway.

    Looks like some more sleuthing is in order again. Any takers?, It would be good if we could get more people involved.
     
  2. KenH

    KenH
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    I think this thread is an unfair attack on Target.

    Earlier in the year, Target had announced a new corporate policy that banned Salvation Army collection kettles from its storefronts. The retailer had a no-solicitation policy at its stores but previously had made an exception for the Salvation Army. That exception has now gone by the wayside. In a September 2004 statement, Target spokesperson Carolyn Brookter said the chain "determined that if we continue to allow the Salvation Army to solicit, then it opens the door to other groups that wish to solicit our guests."

    "It's becoming increasingly difficult to have an exception to our policy, so we decided we would have no exceptions," Brookter said. "This year we just said it's time to ... make our solicitation policy consistent."


    - LINK
     
  3. Thankful

    Thankful
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    I agree, KenH.

    When I had a business, people soliciting my customers for money and even to buy "stuff" was a problem. (The Salvation Army never asked)

    If a person wants to give to any organization, they can.
     
  4. emeraldctyangel

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    Target gives a portion of all their profits to different causes anyway, it says so on their receipts.

    If you dont like the way they do business in the community, then dont shop there. I have no problem with their decision to not allow people to stand in their parking lot attempting to gather signatures or donations.
     
  5. Magnetic Poles

    Magnetic Poles
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    I am glad for Target's decision. One problem (among many) at Wal-Mart is the constant barrage of walking through a maze of begging charities at the door. I prefer to shop unaccosted. Makes you feel like you are at a flea market in Mexico.
     
  6. hillclimber

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    It puts stores in a no win situation. Target is one of my favorite stores. I've noticed our Walmart Super Center has no solicitors at the doors anymore, but I don't know the reason.
     
  7. bruren777

    bruren777
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    Ken, I was not attacking Target, I'm just reiterating the media reports last year.
    I guess Target does have to be careful about being selective re. who can or can't solicit outside their doors. The liberal ACLU would turn it into a circus.

    Thankful-I'm not sure what you mean in your response. I don't have a problem with the Salvation Army bell ringers. They are a tradition that goes back into my childhood and that's a very long time ago.
     
  8. Johnv

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    I will not be boycotting Target. I have no problem with their decision. They're a private business, one that gives very generously to the local community. They have a right to control solicitng, and the Salvation Army has never once complained about it. In fact, the Tustin Salvation Army Church (near me) has said that they support Target's right to ban solicitors, even if ti includes them. BTW, I have no problem with the Salvation Army either, though I'm not in agreement with all of their doctrine.
     
  9. Plain Old Bill

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    The Salvation Army bell ringer have always been a part of Christmas for me. I can't remember a time when I have'nt dropped money into thier buckets at this time of year.
    My sister and brother-in-law are both captains in the Salvation Army.While I'm not on board with Weslyan theology they do much very good work.My brother-in-law has recently served 2 weeks in the recently hit hurricane area to help the folks down there(they trade off time wise so nobody gets totally worn down).They also work with the poor in the local areas they serve.
    While Target is certainly free to do as they wish and I do shop there from time to time although not often.I will spend my Christmas shopping money in stores where the Salvation Army is welcome because that is my choice.
     
  10. music4Him

    music4Him
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    Well after thinking this thing out I got an idea. If I can get some products cheeper at Target (most of the time on higher priced items I can save approx $10.00) I could go ahead and buy at Target the drive over to Walmart and share my savings with the bell ringers. Now this can also be accoplished with any of our spending this year and what you save you can bless others. BTW, don't just save for donations during the holidays there are other charities that could use our help through out the year. (ie. animal shelters, volunteer fire departments, disabled vetrans, feed the children, ...ect.) [​IMG]

    I don't know if the artical on Target is on the up and up, but if not I do remember a scripture that says the wealth of the wicked is laid up for the rightious.
     
  11. rsr

    rsr
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    I support a company's ability to control access to its property.

    However, I think Target took the expedient way out of making such decisions.

    "It's becoming increasingly difficult to have an exception to our policy, so we decided we would have no exceptions," a Target spokesman said, which is saying the company didn't want to make a decision.

    It's not surprising; public companies are supposed to make money for their shareholders, not deal with every charity that wants to put a bake sale in the parking lot. Wouldn't you love to say yes to a church group fund raiser and then find the Westboro Baptist Church manning the booth?
     

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