Lombardi said who was the best qb?

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Bob Alkire, Jan 19, 2007.

  1. Bob Alkire

    Bob Alkire
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    Lombardi said that Jurgensen may be the best qb the league has ever seen. Lombardi said, Jurgensen is the best I have seen.
     
  2. Bob Alkire

    Bob Alkire
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    Maybe Lombaridi could have said Norm Van Brocklin.

    In Philadelphia he was given a free hand at running the offensive show, and behind his leadership the Eagles won the NFL title in 1960. In other words he was the offesive coordinator. Van Brocklin was the only man to defeat a Lombardi-coached Green Bay team in championship game play.
     
  3. EdSutton

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    Don't know about that, but Sonny Jurgensen had the best quote I ever heard from a quarterback.

    "There's an art to 'grounding the football.'"

    Ed
     
  4. El_Guero

    El_Guero
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    Lombardi said, "Second place is the first loser."

    :thumbs:
     
  5. DeeJay

    DeeJay
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    We would accomplish many more things if we did not think of them as impossible.
    -Lombardi
     
  6. Bob Alkire

    Bob Alkire
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    Sonny was ask when he was going to get in shape due to his rather larger middle. He said he was in shape, his arm was in great shape.
     
  7. A&I

    A&I
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    Sonny

    I remember watching Sonny Jurgensen .He threw a interception and you know when the QB tries to tackle the guy that picks him off .Well at the corner of the TV screen Sonny got destroyed .One of the ugliest hits I ever saw. It looked like a car hitting a chubby older man .I am pretty sure he never played again .
     
  8. Bob Alkire

    Bob Alkire
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    If it was in his last few years he was a chubby old man, in his younger days he was just a chubby man. But with that said, he sure could pass and read a defense. He would give the OL down the road if he was sacks, kind of like Bobby Lane, but Bobby would slap the ol man upside the head if he got sacks. But there was only one Bobby Lane and come to think of it there was only one Sonny.
     
  9. Alcott

    Alcott
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    I remember Jurgenson in the late 60's and early 70's, and it seems like he threw a soft, accurate pass, rather like Ken Stabler a few years later.

    The QB's of the 60's became well-known because, for the most part, they really had authority out on the field, calling their own plays, sending guys out who missed their block; basically being semi-coaches. I doubt if Van Brocklyn was the only one who had such command. A number of them, particularly Unitas, did interviews in which they degraded this loss of on-field authority and having a head coach or coordinator call the plays, and all the "personnel packages." The same man leading the same 10 others (as long as they did their job) remained their fancy.

    I thought I remembered Lombardi being once quoted as saying Namath was the QB he would like to build a team around if he could start again with a new team. I've always believed the real reason he stepped down as head coach of Green Bay was because he knew they couldn't possibly continue winning after '67 and the second Super Bowl, which would tarnish his legend, having turned GB around from 1-10-1 to a winning record his first season, the conference championship his 2nd season, then 5 NFL championships in the next 7 years, with never a losing record. And he went to Washington for his final season coaching because they were capable of winning with a coach who could make them fundamentally sound, starting with his choice at QB, Jurgenson... or was Jurgenson his choice because that's where he chose to go? Anyway, they had receiver Charley Taylor and RB Larry Brown, so talented QB, RB, and WR go a long way toward setting up a winner. He wouldn't have gone to Atlanta or New Orleans, expansion teams with 'promising' rookies and worn-out veterans, or Philadephia or Chicago, filled with tired veterans more so than Green Bay at that time. The big-name coaches are most knowledgeable about where to go that winning is a likelihood.
     
  10. Bob Alkire

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    He came over from LA to play qb and run the show on offense and then become head coach. But the head coach didn't step down and he went to the Twin cities.
     
  11. Bob Alkire

    Bob Alkire
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    Washington was one of the lower paying teams in the NFL back then. Most folks in the know, said he had lost his mind to go to Washington to coach. Washington was know as a place that killed coaches, because they didn't spend money. At one time back then Sonny and Sam Huff were the big boys in pay on that team around $30,000. or $40,000 a year. Unitas said Sonny was the best bargain around for what he was being paid.
    But he was a east coast type, and that put him back in football and on the east coast. But I don't know why he came back to coaching.
     

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