Lousiana College establishing a Divinity School

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by mjohnson7, Jun 16, 2011.

  1. mjohnson7

    mjohnson7
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    If this has been discussed already and I missed it, I apologize. LC has plans of establishing a divinity school this fall. According to the news release on their website, they plan to take into consideration the unique needs of nontraditional students (bi-vo pastors). It did not mention ATS accreditation at all; only SACS. Wouldn't it be wonderful if they completely ignored the ATS altogether?? :praying:
     
  2. Greektim

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    Can't see the value in this w/ NOBTS down the road.
     
  3. StefanM

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    220 miles down the road, though. This could be especially helpful for ministers in the area or laypersons seeking further training.
     
  4. mjohnson7

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    Yes. It would be especially helpful for ministers in the area. As well, if they don't pursue ATS accreditation, they will be free to offer more flexible degree options. Another leg up over NOBTS, even though NOBTS is more flexible with its MDiv than the other Big 6.
     
  5. StefanM

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    That would be excellent. ATS is a dinosaur.
     
  6. preachinjesus

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    If you ever want to see an area of the economy that is doing well in spite of the economy you'd want to look at higher education. Exploding all around us.
     
  7. StefanM

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    As one who works in higher education, I can attest to this. In fact, economic declines can sometimes increase enrollment as people try to return to school to improve their prospects for work.
     
  8. TomVols

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    I disagree about the growth of education right now.

    Three DL intensive schools are scaling back due to decreased enrollment. One school locally has eliminated an extension center altogether. One B&M school in my area has closed its communications department completely, among other major/program cuts. UTK is eliminating programs all over due to funding problems.

    There are niche areas that are fairly recession proof. However, education is not exempt from our poor economy.
     
  9. preachinjesus

    preachinjesus
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    You know what's an interesting question to ask applicants about their degrees, "who did you study with at ___________ school?"

    I'm finding more and more guys applying for positions who can't answer that question with someone I know or have heard of.

    I don't understand this constant expansion of programs and such. I mean how many other schools think they can replicate the success of Liberty or some other school without offering something substantive?

    I wish it well but the proximity to NOBTS and SWBTS and DTS is going to be rough.
     
  10. StefanM

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    It's not universal growth, but growth is occurring in many fields in education. State-funded schools are probably the most likely to be hit hard in a recession, as state budgets are being cut.

    Traditional education also isn't very conducive to growth, as traditional students require additional facilities (and the accompanying expenses) that non-traditional students do not.

    Non-traditional education (if done right) has a much greater chance of increasing revenue for the institution. This can come through distance education or through non-traditional extension campuses. Low overhead combined with a tuition-driven (mostly via federal financial aid) revenue base can lead to significant growth.
     
  11. TomVols

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    Stefan wrote:
    I'd like to see the numbers on this. Ironically, as Lottery Scholarships have "increased," the supply of education has decreased and this is somewhat common across the board for various reasons.

    I don't disagree that DL can be attractive as the overhead is quite low. Of course, the marketing tends to run a bit higher as alternative channels are utilized.

    The small school who cut its entire Comm dept is a private school. They're particularly sensitive as recession-struck students look for cheaper alternatives, and donor units/dollars shrink. Another private school has an endowed chair that is empty right now because its endowment source is not able to generate enough to pay the salary for the prof.

    A sinking tide lowers all boats. Of course, some community colleges are doing okay, but then again they depend on state funding so we're back to that animal again.

    In summary, people have long posited that education is not economy-dependent. I think this recession is showing that this is not the case.
     
  12. StefanM

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    This is a complication of traditional education, as I mentioned previously. Communications isn't really a major in demand in the workforce, particularly in a recession-ravaged economy.

    Closing the department could also be a creative way to eliminate expenses whenever you have a number of tenured faculty. I'm not saying this was the case, but I've heard of it happening before. Tenure policies typically allow for layoffs when departments are eliminated.
     
  13. TomVols

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    That wasn't the case. The chair of the dept died and his post was left vacant. The interim took another post and that left too much of a demand. They could not hire faculty for the posts and the part-time facutly who had been stop-gaps took full-time jobs elsewhere (not in academia) so the easy move was to just scorch earth. Students are either changing majors or transferring.
     

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