Making Halloween Safe and Fun for Kids with Diabetes

Discussion in '2004 Archive' started by HOHNancy, Oct 17, 2004.

  1. HOHNancy

    HOHNancy
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    In case you know a child with diabetes, you may want to pass this one along. [​IMG] -- Nancy

    Making Halloween Safe and Fun for Kids with Diabetes

    For parents of kids with diabetes, Halloween can be a real test of will and spirit. Sending your child off to trick or treat may feel a bit like letting Augustus Gloop loose in Willy Wonka's famed factory -- floating up the chocolate river without a paddle. But with a little preparation, you and your children can have a safe and happy Halloween.
    What parents need to know about kids, candy, and Halloween:

    * Candy is dandy....as long as it's in moderation. Despite popular misconceptions, sugar is not completely off limits for kids and adults with well-controlled diabetes. Make sure the carbohydrate counts of candy are figured into your child's meal plan and covered by his or her insulin. Your child may want to stash some of his sweets to treat lows. Sock the rest away for snacks or sharing with friends.

    * Treats don't have to be sweets. Stickers, small toys, books, rubber spiders, and other gifts make great goodies for little ghouls.

    * Fun size it. The smaller version of the real thing is just the ticket for kids with diabetes. Keep some extra fun-sized packages of your kids favorites from your own Halloween handouts so you can trade any high sugar or large size candy items for them. One caveat: don't let size fool you. The carbohydrate count of a fun-sized chocolate bar runs around 10-15 g, while a Milky Way fun-sized bar contains 43 g. Always read the label.

    * Set up shop. Susan Perry, R.D., C.D.E., a diabetes educator affiliated with the Joslin Diabetes Center, suggests that parents "buy" some of the overflow from their kids haul and allow them to use the money to purchase an appropriate toy or book.

    * Trade it in. A variation on buying the loot is to barter for it. Parents can purchase a bag of fun non-candy Halloween goodies and make a game of swapping sweets for non-edible treats.

    * Scare the pants off of 'em. Sure, candy is a big part of Halloween, but spooky stories, haunted houses, pumpkin carving, and other ghastly pastimes are even more important. If your kids are old enough, consider hosting a monster bash and put the focus on the fun instead of the food.

    * Fun for the five and under set. Smaller children may also enjoy a costume party or Halloween parade with age-appropriate activities. Put them to work pumpkin painting, bobbing for apples, or building scarecrows. Limiting trick-or-treating to the homes of friends and neighbors can keep the total amount of candy to a reasonable level.

    Your child should check blood glucose levels often if they are participating in parties, parades, or strenuous activities. The same goes for after treats. An insulin adjustment may also be in order. Check with your child's doctor for advice on covering extra carbohydrates with adjusted insulin dosage.

    For more on making Halloween safe and fun for kids with diabetes, and for the carbohydrate counts of some popular brand name treats, read these excellent tips from the Joslin Diabetes Center at: http://diabetes.about.com/cs/kidsandfood/a/blnhalloween01.htm
     
  2. following-Him

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    Children of Christian parents encouraged to celebrate halloween????????? Tell me you are not serious!!!!!!!!!!
     
  3. Matt Black

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    Halloween is satanic and I likewise am surprised and dismayed to see it discussed like this on a Christian board

    Yours in Christ

    Matt
     
  4. pastorjeff

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    This is good information for parents with diabetic children, whether for Halloween or any time. I am sure many parents will appreciate the info whether there kids trick-or- treat or not [​IMG]
     
  5. Karen

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    Dear Sheila and Matt,
    I think we partly have a cultural miscommunication going on here.
    I spent quite a while in the U.K., and you just don't make as big a deal about holidays and celebrations as people do in the U.S.

    For many Christians in the U.S. like me, Halloween was long ago stripped of bad connotations. Most, I am sure, could not tell you it means All Hallows' Eve, the eve of All Saints' Day on Nov. 1st, followed by All Souls' Day on Nov. 2.

    On Oct. 31, little kids in cute costumes come to our front door, and we give them candy. I expect this year there will be lots of tigers, firemen, princesses, and spidermen.
    Lots of churches have harvest-type parties with games, prizes, hayrides, etc., with NONE of the connotations you are thinking of. I will be helping at a great one down the road that will have several hundred kids. Many of whom will hear the Gospel.

    In other words, the only thing about Halloween you would recognize is the name itself, and people here couldn't tell you what that name means.

    Karen
     
  6. ScottEmerson

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    Just because one doesn't know its background isn't an excuse. Our family doesn't do Halloween at all, but this month, (to my dismay), we're doing a Fall Festival type thing. I've got to be there, but I really wish I didn't have to. A horse by any other name is still a horse.
     
  7. pastorjeff

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    ScottEmerson,
    Do you celebrate Easter? Do you celebrate Christmas?

    Even though these have Christian roots they are still steeped in pagenism. What is the solution to these problems. And why do you HAVE to be at this festival? if it is wrong and corrupt why go at all?
     
  8. Karen

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    I guess I disagree. My point is that the horse has been so thoroughly transformed by many that it is no longer a horse.

    Karen
     
  9. Debby in Philly

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    As I diabetic myself, I appreciate this kind of information being passed along. Get off your high horses, people, he was only trying to help.

    And yes, our church, for the first time, is doing a "Fall Festival" for the children and young people in our community, an inner city neighborhood. As a Halloween alternative, isn't it better to invite kids in for safe fun and treats, as well as giving them and their parents a chance to come under the gospel?

    I've heard of someone putting out the idea that Christian children should go knocking on doors (with their parents, of course) dressed as Bible characters, and when given candy, say "Thank you, and this is for you." and give the person an attractive, well done tract or booklet. Take the day back from the enemy!
     
  10. donnA

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    The thread seems to be about children with diabettes and how they can safely eat candy. It does not appear to be an encouragement to celebrare halloween. No matter how mush anyone hate halloween and disagrees with it there are still going to be christians who do something for halloween. What can be wrong with informing them how thier diabettic children can be safe.

    Exactly!

    Why do we allow the enemy(satan) to claim so many days on our callendar. This is the day the Lord has made, is that some days or everyday? God created the concept of days and the passage of time to mark days, why give that to satan? Reclaim what satan has tried to steal. (or has been given by christians)
     
  11. James_Newman

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    The title of the thread is 'Making Halloween Safe and Fun for kids with Diabetes.' Maybe it should be renamed to 'Sending Kids to Hell with Holes in Their Teeth'. It is in the debate forum, so it is fair game.

    Why are we going to encourage our children to participate in a worldly exercise of dressing up like monsters and begging for candy? Does this glorify God somehow? Whether or not the 'bad' connotations have been stripped away is debatable, but what have they been replaced with that is good? Just because the children walking around in the streets arent openly worshipping Satan does not mean that this is something that we should take part in.

    Halloween is a time when the world celebrates fear. Jumping out of the shadows and scaring someone, or putting on a spooky costume to horrify little children, all these things are meant to glorify fear. Fear of the devil, fear of evil, fear of death, whatever. God has not given us a spirit of fear.

    1 Thessalonians 5:22
    Abstain from all appearance of evil.
     
  12. dianetavegia

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    Our church has a Fall Festival but advertises in the paper and ask for no demonic or scary costumes please. We have games, hot dogs, chili, etc. all for free. We also use the names of those registered and follow through with evangelistic visits.

    The Wednesday night before.... we have 'Come as your favorite Bible Character' for AWANA in an effort to encourage the kids to wear those type costumes to the Fall Festival.
     
  13. TC

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    So, what do you that hate halloween do when trick or treaters knock on your door? Do tell them to just go away? Or, do you give them candy and a Bible tract geared for their age? Or, do you turn out all the lights and pretend no one is home? Or, do you have a holy huddle and talk about how bad everybody else is?
     
  14. dianetavegia

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    We work the Fall Festival at church and don't leave lights on. Our driveway is VERY steep and no sense someone climbing that, climbing a flight of stairs to find we're not at home.
     
  15. TC

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    I was mainly addressing those that complained of the fall festivals too. I guess I was not clear enough. If you are not at a fall festival, what do you do?
     
  16. donnA

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    If the porch light is off they are not to knock on your door.
     
  17. ScottEmerson

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    Go see a movie. Go to the mall. Spend time with like-minded friends and family at a restaurant. All kinds of things. We don't talk about how bad everyone else is.
     
  18. ScottEmerson

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    I celebrate Easter, but not the Easter bunny. Easter is about the resurrection of Christ. That is what I celebrate. I celebrate Christmas, as it is the symbolic date of the birth of Christ. I don't know what there is to celebrate about Christ in the holiday of Halloween. The next day is about celebrating saints. I usually don't go around doing that. So, yes, there is a big difference for me there. Easter and Christmas are no Halloween for me, and I choose not to celebrate it nor teach my future children to celebrate it as well.

    As for being there, I am on staff at my church, so I will be there on October the 31st, although I am seriously thinking about discussing with my pastor the reservations behind it.
     
  19. Pastor J

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    We do not turn on our exterior light.

    As far as the holiday is concerned. I find it interesting that the #1 costume sold last year was a witch. Please tell me how this day is not evil. It is also the #1 day for children to disappear. Scripture is clear that as parents we are obligated to keep our children from satanic influences such as witchcraft. I can't think of the verse, but I believe it is in Deut.
     
  20. following-Him

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    Deuteronomy 18:10-13

    "Let no-one be found among you who sacrifices his son or daughter in the fire, who practices divination or sorcery, interprets omens, engages in witchcraft, or who cast spells, or who is a medium or spiritist or who consults the dead. Anyone who does these things is detestable to the Lord, and because of these detestable practices the Lord your God will drive out those nations before you. You must be blameless before the Lord your God".

    Having read that, who here now can justify the celebration of halloween in any way, shape or form?

    Sheila
     

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