Matthew 1:1-17

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by sag38, Dec 6, 2010.

  1. sag38

    sag38
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    Have any of you ever preached a sermon from Matthew 1:1-17? I'm working on ideas right now. Any suggestions would help.
     
  2. Jerome

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    Why Tamar, Rahab, etc. are mentioned, and not Sarah, Rebekah, etc.
    Recurrent theme in Matthew is the Gospel is for all nations.
     
  3. annsni

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    I know my pastor has and he addressed the passage from the view of some of the people in the lineage of Christ and how God uses many different kinds of people to fulfill His mission.
     
  4. canadyjd

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    I think the sovereignty of God in bringing about His plan of redemption, in the midst of sinful human beings might be a good place to start.

    Tamar (if I remember correctly and this is all from memory) was married to one of Judah's sons. The son died, and his brother callously refused to honor his committment to sire a child for his brother. God killed him for his actions. Judah refused to allow the final son to marry Tamar. She pretended to be a prostitute and tricked Judah in to a relationship in which she concieved. Her children are in the geneology of Jesus.

    Rahab was a pagan prostitute.

    Many of the kings that are mentioned are horrible kings who engage in all sorts of idolatry and murder.

    Hope that leads you in the right direction.

    peace to you:praying:
     
  5. Gabriel Elijah

    Gabriel Elijah
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    The meaning of the Davidic Covenant & Jesus’ legal claim to the throne through his genealogy. Further, as some have touched on—God’s using scandalous Gentile women as part of the Savior’s genealogy. (who they where & what the implications of this are)
     
    #5 Gabriel Elijah, Dec 6, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 6, 2010
  6. sag38

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    I'm thinking along these lines being that Matthew was legitimizing Jesus through establishing his genealogy.

    I. A Regal Claim to Legitimacy: There are some great names in this genealogy. Great kings and great leaders are found on this family tree. Of course there is the promised seed from Abraham and the right to the Throne of David.
    II. A Sordid Claim to Legitimacy: There are some not so great names in this genealogy too. Some of gentiles with sordid reputations. Imagine tracing the blood line back to find a Moabite (scandalous). There's also a prostitute, an adulterer, and Tamar. One can't help but to see the grace of God and the sovereignty of God displayed in His use of these women.
    III. A Supernatural Claim to Legitimacy: While Joseph is listed in this genealogy he is not noted as being Jesus' father. Jesus' father is non other than the God Himself.
     
  7. Robert Snow

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    One other thing this portion of Scripture shows me is that God will fulfill his Word regardless. In spite of the greatness of character or lack of character involved with people, God will not be thwarted. He promised to bring his Messiah into the world and to do so through the linage of David and He did it.
     
  8. Dr. Bob

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    I. FOCUS ON GOD’S PLAN IN HISTORY

    A. PREDICTION IN THE OLD TESTAMENT


    B. COMPREHENSION OF THE PROPHETS


    C. PERCEPTION UNIQUE TO MATTHEW


    II. FOCUS ON GOD’S GRACE IN HISTORY
    A. GRACE TO ONE WOMAN Matthew 1:16b
    Mary

    B. GRACE TO TWO MEN Matthew 1:1
    Abraham

    David

    C. GRACE TO THREE ERASMatthew 1:2-16a
    Abraham to David

    David to Captivity

    Captivity to Christ


    D. GRACE TO FOUR OUTCASTS
    Tamar

    Rahab

    Ruth

    Bathsheba

    III. FOCUS ON THE KING IN HISTORYMatthew 1:1
    A. JESUS - BORN A PROPHET

    B. JESUS - BORN A PRIEST

    C. JESUS - BORN A KING
     
  9. drfuss

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    "D. GRACE TO FOUR OUTCASTS
    Tamar

    Rahab

    Ruth

    Bathsheba"


    I understand the first three as being outcasts, but I don't understand why Bathsheba is included. I think David was the one mostly at fault in the affair. It is questionable if Bathsheba really had a choice since David was the king.

    This thread has got me considering putting together a talk on Matt. 1:1-17 for my men's Bible study prayer breakfast.
     
  10. RAdam

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    Why 3 generations were cut out from David to the carrying away to Babylon. Interesting study.
     
  11. Gabriel Elijah

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    While I’m sure there are many great books on this passage-I’ve read 3 commentaries recently that are very insightful—Michael J Wilkins-“Matthew” NIV application; Craig Keener, “A Commentary on the Gospel of Matthew”; & David L Turner, “Matthew” Baker Exegetical Commentary on the NT. Also the article by John Nolland, “The Four (Five) Women and other Annotations in Matthew’s Genealogy,” NTS 43 (1997):527-39 is interesting. And while I certainly don’t agree with all of his conclusions—Raymond E Brown “The Birth of the Messiah”-covers varies theories on the topic.
     

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