Matthew 5:22 Thou fool

Discussion in '2005 Archive' started by dianetavegia, Apr 15, 2005.

  1. dianetavegia

    dianetavegia
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    Matthew 5:22 But I say unto you, That whosoever is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the judgment: and whosoever shall say to his brother, Raca, shall be in danger of the council: but whosoever shall say, Thou fool, shall be in danger of hell fire.


    Why is the person who calls another a 'fool' in danger of the fire of hell? Is it unjustified anger? Is it the severity of the remark? It is quetioning the persons salvation? The word 'foolish' is used many times in scripture.


    Raca: Vain fellow

    Thou Fool: The New Testament. There are fewer Greek terms employed for the fool and these are essentially negative, indicating that the fool is lacking in sense and intelligence. The gravity of the condition of the fool can be seen in the warning of Jesus that to call a person such is to be in danger of "the fire of hell" (Matt 5:22). The designation "fool" is considerably more derogatory than other terms of abuse. Clearly, to be a fool in this biblical sense is a serious matter.

    http://bible1.crosswalk.com/Dictionaries/BakersEvangelicalDictionary/bed.cgi?number=T269

    Matthew 7:26
    But everyone who hears these words of Mine and doesn't act on them will be like a foolish man who built his house on the sand.


    From same link as above:
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Paul makes frequent ironic reference to foolishness, particularly in 1 and 2 Corinthians. He deprecates the wisdom of the world, which characterizes God's action in Jesus as nonsensical and scandalous. Human understanding erroneously takes God's wisdom to be foolishness and God's strength to be weakness since God's actions do not fit human reason or expectation. Indeed, from a worldly perspective God uses the foolish thing and calls the foolish person (1 Cor 1:27-28).

    Paul characterizes his self-defense in 2 Corinthians as foolish. He is forced by circumstances to employ worldly methods of refutation of charges arraigned against him (2 Cor 11:1-6). He is forced to fight fire with fire. Further he recognizes that he is considered a fool by the world because of his suffering for the gospel (1 Cor 4:10).

    Elsewhere in the New Testament foolish has a more conventional sense. Believers are urged not to be foolish (Eph 5:15-16) and to distinguish carefully between heavenly and earthly wisdom (Jas 3:13-18).

    This negative attitude toward foolishness is understandable when its practices are observed. Among these practices are: relying on earthly wealth (Luke 12:20); failing to recognize that the ministry of Jesus is God's visitation to claim his own bride (Matt 25:1-13); turning away from the gospel of grace to legalism (Gal 3:1-3); worshiping the creature rather than the Creator (Rom 1:18-23); and abrogating the demands of God with meaningless distinctions (Matt 23:16-22). Perhaps even more significant than the above characteristics is a failure to act on the words of Jesus by building a house without an adequate foundation (Matt 7:26-27), and a failure to believe the good news of Jesus' resurrection (Luke 24:25 — here the foolish are described as "slow of heart" the Old Testament expression is "without heart, " without understanding, as in Prov 9:16). The believer is not to be foolish, but to "understand what the Lord's will is" (Eph 5:17).
     
  2. chipsgirl

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    I always felt that a fool in biblical sense was a serious manner because it meant that if you were being one, then you were not living Christian-like. If you call someone a fool wouldn't it mean you are judging, therefore, you are possibly the fool as well?
     
  3. dianetavegia

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    John Gill's Exposition of the Bible

    I had not given this much thought until today while cleaning. [​IMG] I have deep thoughts while deep in dust. [​IMG]
     
  4. chipsgirl

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  5. TCassidy

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    He isn't.

    In Matthew 3 Jesus's public ministry begins with the announcement of John the Baptist that Jesus is the Christ, the Messiah, Emmanuel or "God with us."

    In chapter 4 Jesus, based on his authority from the Father, calls unto Himself His disciples and teaches them (something that was reserved for Rabbis who had been given the keys to the Temple library as a badge of authority).

    In chapter 5 Jesus gives the disciples the beatitudes in verses 1-12 and the similitudes in verses 13-16. Then, in verses 17 and following he begins to teach them about Himself confirming that the authority of the Law is His authority, the authority of the Prophets is His authority, and the authority of the word of God is His authority.

    Now notice verse 22. Whoever is angry with his brother, without cause, is in danger of judgment (temporal, not spiritual), and whoever says to his brother "Raca" is in danger of the Sanhedrin, but whoever says "You fool" is in danger of hell. Note that the addressee "brother" is missing from this last warning. That is because Jesus is not talking about calling a brother a fool, but, rather, is talking about calling Him a fool for His claimes in the previous verses which, when understood in context, are a not so thinly veiled claim to deity. When Jesus claims to be God in the flesh, the one calling Him a "fool" for making that claim is very much in danger of hell fire.

    In fact, in the bible, God calls people "fool" several times, and so does Paul in 1 Corinthians 15:36. [​IMG]
     
  6. dianetavegia

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    I don't find anyone who agrees with you in the concordances, TCassidy.
    (Darby's Synopsis of New Testament; Geneva Study Bible; Gill's Exposition of the Bible; Jamieson, Fausset, Brown; Matthew Henry Complete)

    named edited only

    [ April 15, 2005, 06:39 PM: Message edited by: dianetavegia ]
     
  7. natters

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    Just my 2 cents: it's hard to call someone a "fool" without holding animosity in your heart, or at least opening yourself up to those sorts of feelings. If you're not careful, pretty soon you can have a real bad attitude towards that person, possibly even developing into hate - and "whosoever hateth his brother is a murderer: and ye know that no murderer hath eternal life abiding in him."

    It is possible to call someone a fool and not allow the negative feelings develop. That why I think the verse says "in danger of" instead of "will experience" - the danger is there, but it's not a certainty. Like "whosoever speeds in their car is in danger of crashing" does not guarantee you will crash if you speed.
     
  8. TCassidy

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    Well, I am not too concerned whether some commentators agree with me. You asked for my input and I gave it. [​IMG]
     
  9. gb93433

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    To call someone a fool is to judge them. We do not have the capability to judge people correctly.

    Prov. 26:12, "Do you see a man wise in his own eyes? There is more hope for a fool than for him."

    Prov. 29:20, "Do you see a man who is hasty in his words? There is more hope for a fool than for him."

    Ps. 14:1, "The fool has said in his heart, "There is no God." They are corrupt, they have committed abominable deeds; There is no one who does good."

    The person who is hasty in his words is lower than a fool and the fool has said there is no God.

    Jesus sees abusive language as the same as murder as does the book of James.

    James 2:11, "For He who said, "Do not commit adultery," also said, "Do not commit murder." Now if you do not commit adultery, but do commit murder, you have become a transgressor of the law."
     
  10. Watchman

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    For my two cents worth, I would say one will speak according to what is in one's heart. Anyone can have a slip of the tongue, but to seek someone's hurt by malicious words, how does the love of God abide in such a person?
    In short, this person is not lost because of the words, the words are indicative that they are lost.
     

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