May - Reading 21

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Clint Kritzer, May 21, 2002.

  1. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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  2. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Good evening -

    Tonight in 2Samuel we witness David, the deposed king, continuing in his wandering escape from Jerusalem and his son turned nemesis, Absalom. The first new character that we meet is Ziba. Ziba supplies David with donkeys and food. The other new character that we see is Shimie. Shimie has a high disdain for David because of some unnamed blood bath of a battle which David's troops obviously won. This man hurls insults and rocks and a well armed company of warriors. Even as foolish as this act of Shemei may seem, David prevents any retaliation. David recognizes that the man may be sent by God and his words may be true. This demeanor of humility shows what a true man of God David really was.
    At the end of chapter 16 we flash back to Jerusalem. Absalom has taken counsel from one of his father's former advisors, Ahithophel. The first piece of advice that we see is for Absalom to have sex with the ten concubines that David had left behind on the roof of the (palace?) and all of Israel becomes aware of this act. This fulfills Nathan's prophecy in verse 12:11.

    As a side note here to the running commentary, I think that one of the most valuable lessons that we learn from this story is that God forgives us, and God protects us, but sin has its own consequences with which we have to deal. David was a man of God yet his adulterous affair with Bathsheba set all of this into motion.

    In chapter 17 we see the effectiveness of David's mole, Hushai. He counters the advice given by Ahithophel to mount an attack upon David. The bruisingof Ahithophel's pride is more than he can bear and in verse 23 he hangs himself.

    In our reading of Mark, we read the account of Jesus before Pilate. The Jewish leaders rather than tryingto press their own charges of blasphemy make Christ's accusations into a state matter. Notice in verse 5 that Pilate was amazed. Mark is very into the word "amazed" in his Gospel (marvelled in the KJV). At almost every miracle and teaching that Christ performs in this Book, the people are "amazed." Now even in silence He still amazes the Roman magistrate.
    One other quick point that Mark gives us in verse 15:7 is that Barabbas was part of some sort of uprising, probably against the Romans.

    In Galatians I was very interested by the statement in verse 10: You are observing special days and months and seasons and years. When I first joined the board I was very suprised that our Primitivistic brethren do not observe Easter or Christmas. I had no revelations from this verse, but this is the first thing that came to mind.

    May God bless you

    - Clint
     
  3. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Sunday School lecture - 6/29/03

    Galatians 4:8-20

    Verses 12-20 can be referred to as the “appeal to emotion.” This text gives us a bit of biographical information and some insight into Paul’s initial encounter with the Galatians. Aside from the firm arguments of chapter 2 & 3, an appeal to emotion is often a very effective tool in debate as emotionalism will sway someone one way or the other, a device often used as well by the legalists. Having the Galatians think back to that initial meeting and experience would reinforce Paul’s demonstration of the initial conversion experience. The rhetorical question of 16 is more or less a guilt trip tactic.

    We do encounter more difficulties in this passage, however. The “bodily ailment” spoken of in verse 13 is not specified and has led to much conjecture on the subject. Some believe that the affliction was malaria and Paul went to the higher elevation of Galatia to heal just as people in our time would go to Arizona for respiratory ailments. This would support the North Galatian theory if correct. Others think that Paul may have had epilepsy. I am unable to find any support for this conjecture. Another popular theory is that Paul had failing eyesight and support this notion with the text from verse 15 and 6:11. Paul also refers to the “thorn in his flesh” 2Corinthians 12:7 with no further explanation as to what this may be and many conjecture eyesight also from this passage. Further support of the theory is found in Paul’s initial conversion experience on the road to Damascus when he saw a blinding light that left him unable to see for quite some time. It is interesting that of all the commentary I read, no one puts forth the theory that maybe the guy was just plain long deathly ill. Botulism, dysentery, or pneumonia would fit the bill just as well as any of these other explanations.

    Notice also the switch from “foolish Galatians” to “brothers”, and “little children”. Paul is no longer scolding as an Apostle but imploring as a fellow Christian. Verse 18 finally points out the intentions of the Judaizers and of all legalists throughout history: self-glorification.

    Now back to verses 8-11. (read text) Paul seems to initially start out in verse 8 talking about the paganism from which the Galatians may have been converted. Paganism is defined as “1 : a follower of a polytheistic religion (as in ancient Rome)
    2 : one who has little or no religion and who delights in sensual pleasures and material goods : an irreligious or hedonistic person”

    In verse 9 Paul asks the seemingly unanswerable question of how these people of whom he was convinced had been converted could turn back to this same lifestyle, return to the flesh. Remember, Paul is confused about what was happening to the Galatians. He was a fervent, passionate, zealous man both when he was a Pharisee and after he became an Apostle. He was genuinely shocked at the behavior of these fledgling Christians as we read in verse 20. I think Paul initially underestimated the role of free will and how man by nature is drawn towards the desire of the flesh. I believe Paul learned from his experience with the Galatians. He would repeat the arguments in Galatians when he wrote the Romans, and would speak of the battle between flesh and Spirit in Ephesians, Colossians and Philippians, and briefly in 1Thessalonians. Christ, of course knew of this battle more fully and we have the well known verse of the Spirit being willing, but the flesh being weak.

    These “elemental principles of the world” are certainly the things of which sermons are made and is the concept on which our quarterly wants us to focus.


    Paul seems to switch from the paganistic practices of the Galatian natives to the legalistic practices of the Judaizers in verse 10 without breaking thought, putting these two lifestyles into the same column. Normally, Paul would refer to the Law as superior to paganism (Romans 3:1-2; 9:4-5), however, in this case, both offered the same threat: a turn from the promise of Grace through faith.
    There are sects within the Baptist denomination that take this verse quite literally, concerning religious holidays and do not celebrate Easter nor Christmas. Their reasoning is that we, the church, should be celebrating these occasions ALL the time, not just at some specific point on the calendar. Also, there is no textual evidence that the primitive churches celebrated any holidays, therefore, these sects refrain from making them holy days.

    Verse 12 also has a bit of ambiguity to it and is prone to interpretation. The most plausible explanation I have found is that Paul is referring to the fact that he had lived like a Gentile, despite his Jewish background, and he is imploring the Galatians to now live as he did, in the Christian walk.

    Paganism, as false deity worship, is probably not as great a threat to our culture as it was to the Galatians, however, the desires of the flesh and our leanings toward hedonism are very much prevalent in our culture and if we are not vigilant, the culture affects the church rather than the church affecting the culture. It is easy to add to the flesh column.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. AF Guy N Paradise

    AF Guy N Paradise
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    I understand that sin has it's consequences and David did commit murder and adultery, but here is where I am still confused:

    David had many wives, like 6 of them? Why wasn't he rebuked for adultery after wife #1? I am often confused with all of these men in the OT especially that had many wives, and it did not seem they were condemned.
     
  5. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Indeed, it is a difficult concept with which to wrestle.

    Though it does not fully answer your question, the International Standard Bible Encyclopedia offers these observations:

     
  6. Gwyneth

    Gwyneth
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    14Even though my illness was a trial to you, you did not treat me with contempt or scorn. Instead, you welcomed me as if I were an angel of God, as if I were Christ Jesus himself. 15What has happened to all your joy? I can testify that, if you could have done so, you would have torn out your eyes and given them to me.


    Was Paul blind or did he have bad eyesight, was this his `thorn in the flesh`
    Gwyneth
     
  7. wpe3bql

    wpe3bql
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    When I click on any of your Bible references, I'm sent to Bible Gateway instead.

    What am I doing wrong?
     
  8. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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