May - Reading 23

Discussion in 'Bible Reading Plan 2016' started by Margie Kritzer, May 23, 2002.

  1. Margie Kritzer

    Margie Kritzer
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  2. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Good evening -

    Tonight in 2Samuel we see David regaining control of his kingdom through his private army. The account of Sheba shows how David immediately squelches the rebellion of an insurection. What is surprising is how quickly Israel turns from the returned king. Though Joab is not the appointed leader of the retaliation, it is obvious that he is looked upon as a leader. As I had said back in Joshua, I am a big fan of military maneuvers and I have a strong affinity for fortress stormings. David's army is bent on getting into the city of Abel Beth Maacah. They even build a ramp to attack in force over the walls of the city, An unnamed woman saves the city by convincing the city leaders to surrender Sheba to the invaders, or at least, his head.
    In chapter 21, we see more tribulation resulting from the actions of Saul, this time in the form of a three year famine. David communicates with God and is instructed to allow the Gibeonites to execute seven members of the house of Saul. At the end of the chapter, we learn just how old David has become in that he is nearly killed from becoming exhausted in a battle with the Philistines. David is nearing the end.

    In Mark we read the passage of the death of Jesus. Something I picked up tonight that I had overlooked before is that in verse 35 when the people say that Christ is calling for Elijah, it is because of the similarity to the word, "Eloi." That statement upon the cross is of course the reference to Psalms 22.

    Paul is winding up his appeal to the Church in Galatia with some great statements. Our freedom is through Christ. The Law was what held the Jews in slavery.

    May God bless you

    - Clint
     
  3. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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    Sunday School lecture 7/6/04

    Galatians 5:1-15

    As Sister Boggs pointed out last week, verse 1 is often translated as the conclusionary statement to our passage from last week concerning Sarah and Hagar. Other texts place it as the opening statement of our passage today. Either way, it is a pivotal statement in regards to Paul’s message and the literary form of the Letter. The Galatian church was under assault from the Judaizers, the legalist, and it was critical that the individual believers hold fast to the Thruths they knew to be evident from the Gospel. Submitting to the practice of circumcision would be equal to a reversion to their former paganism. Christ had freed the Galatians from this “yoke of slavery” but there was a danger that they were about to walk right back into bondage on their own.

    In verse 2, Paul has concluded his arguments and his emotional appeal and reverts back to “I, Paul!” This is Paul the Apostle, an emissary from Christ Himself about to speak. The first word in the verse, behold in the KJV, is an exclamatory which could also be translated See, Mark my words, Listen, or even HEY. This is to snap the listeners back to attention. An Apostle of Christ was about to speak and it was important. Verse 2 gives us evidence that the Galatians had not yet submitted to this act but if they do, it will not be of any use to them. Again, Paul warns that to keep one element of the Law puts one under obligation to keep the whole Law. It is not a cafeteria style system. It is all or nothing. The Galatians would once again be putting themselves under the taskmaster.

    Religion as Gospel or religion as law are mutually exclusive. To accept one is to reject the other. This is the overall theme of this entire Letter. If one wishes to receive the Promise to Abraham, Grace, circumcision will avail nothing. In verse 6 Paul clarifies even further that uncircumcision also profits a man nothing. We have now moved into a new concept that will be followed through to the conclusion of the Letter. On one side of our freedom we have those who wish to promote the Law, legalism through performance. On the other side of us we have those that would be too libertine, legalism through non-performance. Neither one matters at all! What matters is faith working through love. Remember this phrase when we get to James: faith works!

    In verse 9 we see a reference to leaven. It should be noted that with the exception of Matthew 13:33 and its parallel in Luke 13:21, leaven is always a simile for evil. This concept of legalism, circumcision for justification, could corrupt the entire church.

    In verse 12, the KJV translates a bit softer than what Paul really meant. A more literal translation is that Paul wishes that the Judaizers would emasculate themselves. Certainly a shocking phrase, there is deeper significance to this text. In many of the pagan cultures, self-mutilation was a part of their ritual to entering certain priesthoods. Therefore, Paul has once again equated Judaism to paganism. Aside from the obvious implications of emasculation, Paul has made another jab at the heathenish beliefs of the Judaizers.

    In 13-15, Paul warns again that turning from the law does not give one license to libertinism. Again, the word “love” is used. This coincides with Paul’s (and Christ’s) summation of the Law: love thy neighbor as thyself. This libertinism was likely leading to these Christians “devouring one another” as described in verse 15.

    (Read text)

    Now, I want to go back to verse 4 for a moment. The doctrine we commonly refer to as “Once saved, always saved” is sometimes attacked with this verse as support. The counter to this attack is that if we are adopted as heirs ( 4:1-4), we can not be unadopted. We also see that the Galatians have not yet submitted to this heresy.

    This doctrine is known by a host of different names. The following are just a few:

     Once in grace, always in grace
     Preservation of the Saints
     Perseverance of the Saints
     The eternal security of the believer

     Once a son, always a son
     The impossibility of apostasy

    As we read through the NewTestament, this doctrine is going to be challenged again and again. It should be noted that both positions are defensible and Baptist thought has waffled on this subject over the centuries. This church, as is fairly congruent through SBC churches teaches Preservation of the Saints and our lessons will always point that way.
     
  4. Clint Kritzer

    Clint Kritzer
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