MBBC President resigned under pressure

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by Paul33, Jul 26, 2006.

  1. Paul33

    Paul33
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    Pardon the pun. Dr. Dave Jaspers resigned from MBBC in May after being confronted with allegations of seeing four different massage therapists and behaving inappropriately.

    He first stated that he had only seen one therapist, then admitted to the truth and offered to resign. The board accepted his resigination.

    His initial response to the public was that he resigned due to the heavy work load as president. The MBBC board, unhappy with that response, eventually sent a public letter to constituents explaining the underlying reason. Since then, Jaspers has become repentant and confessed his bitterness at the board and his need for humility. He denies any wrong doing in the area of message therapy other than poor judgement.

    In his letters to the public, he underscores his heavy schedule and his time away from home. His wife slept "alone," raised the kids "alone," and went to church "alone" because he was gone so much of the time.

    I don't have enough information about what, if anything, went on behind closed doors with message therapists, but from his own words he has admitted to being a "workoholic" and absent from his home.

    Does this concern any of you? I'm deeply troubled with how much time presidents of fundamental colleges are away from home "ministering." He refers to his wife as being like a "widow."

    I'm more alarmed by these statements from his own pen, than the message therapy accusations. What do the rest of you think?
     
    #1 Paul33, Jul 26, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 26, 2006
  2. Rhetorician

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    Response

    :tear: To all who have an ear:

    Does the Scripture not say somewhere that if a man does not take care of his own household he is worse than an infidel? It seems to me that it does.

    Does it not seem also that if a man is too busy to take care of his "homework" that "the work of the Lord" has lost something in the translation?

    If preachers of any hue or tint or stripe put more emphasis on "the Lord's work" than "the wife of their youth;" then sooner or later they will have to pay a price that is much higher than they had anticipated, in my humble but most accurate opinion! HA!:laugh:

    I may be wrong, but from what I have observed "work-aholics" are just as bad in a different way as the real thing. But, the police do not pull you over, send you to jail, and you have to be bailed out for that. Nonetheless, some of the results are just the same and maybe even more devastating.

    It is a sad case when the preacher has time for everyone else's wife and kids and his are at home alone and lonely b/c dad is the "preacher!"

    sdg!

    rd
     
  3. Paul33

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    Rhet,

    You've been around. Is this normal for college presidents? Northland Baptist Bible College had to ask its former president and now chancellor to stay home more! His daughter became pregnant out of wedlock while he was president.

    Is there something that drives these men to be gone so much?
     
  4. El_Guero

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    Rhet

    Sounds like a good scripture, which scripture is it?
     
  5. rbell

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    His "activities" with the massage folks and the fact he was never home are inextricably tied together.

    There's no doubt that his distance he kept from his wife and family caused a bunch of this stuff.

    It doesn't sound good for him...several massage therapists complained of inappropriate behavior. He's in for a rough road.
     
  6. Paul33

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    He allegedly was seeing massage therapists for a bad back at the suggestion of his chiropractor with his wife's knowledge and "insistence."
     
  7. Joseph M. Smith

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    So what exactly is the full story? Are these legitimate massage therapy sessions, nothing more nor less than a treatment to relieve muscular problems? Or have people jumped to the conclusion that these were not real therapists, but "sex workers" using the term massage therapy as a euphemism? Has this Board jumped to an unwarranted conclusion?

    This thing of being so busy that the home is neglected ... it seems to me it is a thirst for affirmation. If you go on the road and accept every invitation, you get a lot of praise and plaudits. At home it's chores and criticism (on the theory that no man is a hero to his valet ... or his family ... because they see the real person and/or the "hero" eventually becomes ordinary). So people who are essentially insecure go wherever they can feel propped up.
     
  8. Martin

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    =="Allegations" of seeing "four different massage therapists"? Or is it allegations of immoral behavior towards/with those therapists?

    Let's not confuse a licensed massage "therapist" with a massage parlor. Some uninformed people have confused the two but they are two different things. One is sinful (parlor) the other is medical (therapist). A massage therapist is like a chiropractor except he/she works with muscles instead of bones. For those who have chronic back pain, headaches, neck pain, etc, a combo of massage therapy sessions & chiropractic sessions can be a big help.

    I know this because my brother is a massage therapist and about to become a chiropractor. I also have another brother in sports medicine.

    If one of the reasons this Dr Jaspers resigned was visiting a medical office (massage therapist) then someone needs to explain to him (and the MBBC) the difference between a massage therapist and a massage parlor. Unless, of course, there is more to the story.

    Having said that the way this man treated his family is a disgrace. He should not be in the ministry.
     
    #8 Martin, Jul 27, 2006
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  9. rbell

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    Martin, thanks for making the important distinction.

    And you're right...if he neglected his family to the degree that it seems from this story, then he shouldn't be in a position of ministry.
     
  10. Paul33

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    Correct Martin.

    No confusion here. He saw four massage therapists (I'm assuming the best - that they were licensed) and allegedly displayed inappropriate behavior). The board interviewed all four therapists and found them to be credible.

    What he displayed is not revealed. Did he merely get too excited during sessions? The article doesn't say. He maintains that he did not seek nor receive "sexual gratification."

    The message therapy issue is a concern, but what concerns me more are his own words to the effect that his wife lived like a "widow" while he "ministered" all over the world.
     
  11. Ophelia

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    Letter From Dr. Jaspers

    July 26, 2006

    Dear Students,

    This response has been a long time in coming. That has not been by accident. While my tendency for many years has been to respond swiftly and with confidence, the Lord has taught me that I have much to learn about patience and true humility. I know I have a long way to go but I am deeply grateful for what the Lord has been teaching me through this most difficult time in my life.

    After reading the letter from the Board, I spent several days in prayer about this matter. I have come to the conclusion that a point-by-point defense of Dave Jaspers will serve no purpose of eternal value. So, I simply want to answer some common questions that people have asked as they seek to deal with this situation.

    In May, I wrote a letter to the Maranatha faculty and staff explaining some of the things going on in my heart. My words were true words. I have come to a strong conviction that no ministry position is worth doing if I cannot properly balance family and ministry. However, my letter did not explain the circumstances that served as the trigger for my decision to resign. As a positive-minded, future-focused, glass-is-half-full, person, I preferred to dwell on the positive things God was doing in my life. It was never my intent to mislead. The allegations were humiliating and I was anxious to switch gears and look forward to life after Maranatha. The Lord had other plans.

    I have, for the past twenty plus years, sought the relief of massage therapy. I suffer from a genetic lower back problem which isn’t always helped by chiropractic treatment. Sometimes the symptoms of pain are in the muscles that are trying to compensate for the weakness of my lower back. A helpful chiropractor recommended that I pursue massage therapy. My wife has had full knowledge of my use of massage therapy and has been fully supportive, even insistent, that I get help. My motive was strictly pain relief and nothing more. At no time has there ever been participation in, or desire for, that which would be immoral. At no time have I sought, or received, any sexual gratification.

    Through these past couple of months, the Lord has revealed some important areas in my life and character that need changing. He has greatly convicted me about the importance of truth. When I was initially confronted by the Board I was shocked and humiliated by the accusations. I lied when asked by the Board if there had been more than one Watertown therapists who had worked on my back. I am deeply ashamed of that. There has not been a day since June 22nd that I haven’t agonized over that failure. It is when we are put in a pressure cooker situation that we learn things about ourselves that aren’t very pretty. That lie cost me all my credibility with the Board. I have asked the Lord to forgive me for that sin and I have asked the Board to forgive me for lying to them.

    I have also been convicted that I need to greatly grow in the areas of modesty, discretion, and caution. I did not exercise wisdom in truly counting the cost of my decisions. I can see now that in my ease in seeking aggressive massage therapy, ignoring some of the warning signs that a more modest and discreet person would have quickly sensed, all indicate that I need the Lord’s help to grow in this important area. I am in no position to lecture other men but I sincerely wish that I would have exercised much more care in this area.

    Most of all, I know that the Lord is teaching me much about humility. I have always been a very confident, take charge, we-can-do-it, kind of leader. While not necessarily wrong, in me it fostered an increasing problem of pride. There is no question that the Lord is taking me on a journey of humility. I have been brought as low as a man can be brought. The Lord allowed me to hit the bottom of bitterness to capture my attention. It has been very painful. Yet, as I meditate on James 4, I realize the potential for good that this can bring to my life. I am willing for the Lord to take as long as this process demands. I long for the grace that He promises to those who are truly humble.

    Change is very difficult. Especially change that takes us a direction in which we never wanted to go. I realize that my life has now forever changed. All I have ever known, or desired to know, is the life of ministry. Now, that is all in jeopardy. As I have contemplated the reality of change and the challenge of personal adversity, my flesh has wanted to find the quickest route out! Graciously, the Lord has not allowed me to avoid what He is intending for good in my life. To sense His working, and at the same time to not know where it will all lead, is very hard. I have learned about my Lord in ways I never expected. I can tell you that Hebrews 12 and James 1 have a whole new meaning for me. Jim Berg’s “Changed Into His Image” has never been more helpful. I have known this material but now I see myself on nearly every page. I earnestly covet your prayers.

    This has been a very hurtful time for Kathy. It has seemed that her great personal sacrifice of the past seven and a half years has been for naught. She is grieving. We all process things differently, and I am committed to our taking as much time as is necessary for her sake. Our daughter, Katie, loves us passionately. She has felt our hurt to the depths of her being. It is a joy to see already some of the life lessons that she has learned through this whole ordeal. Our son, Davis, has been a rock. He is an extremely focused young man. He loves us. He is seeking, with all his heart, to rise above the storm and allow the Lord to use this to make him even stronger. I have counseled both of our children to not take on our offense.

    We are grateful for those who have prayed for us and we ask that you continue to do so. I know that our journey is not over. There is still much to learn, and we pray daily that the Lord will keep our eyes on Him and not be distracted from His gracious work of change in our lives.

    Dave Jaspers
     
  12. Ophelia

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    Letter from Oats

    Dear Students,

    The Lord has given Maranatha, our faculty, and our ministry teams a tremendous summer, and I trust that you are having a great summer wherever you are. We’re looking forward to an excellent beginning to the fall semester with our meetings with Evangelist Will Galkin. Though we rejoice in the summer’s blessings and are excited as usual about the year ahead, we are writing because we know that Dr. Jaspers’ resignation from the presidency of Maranatha weighs heavily on your hearts as it does on ours.

    When Dr. Jaspers resigned, you were among the first to know. After I met with the faculty and staff, I met with those of you who were here for summer school and sent a letter to those of you who were not on campus. I understand that many of you have questions, and please know that I will be willing to discuss them with you when you return to campus. But because you are important members of the Maranatha family, I am writing to you now so that you will understand at least in part what has been taking place.

    Immediately following Dr. Jaspers’ resignation, the Board of Trustees purposely released limited information. They believed that releasing information unnecessarily would needlessly injure him and his family. As many of you are aware, the Board recently sent a letter to alumni and pastors who have supported Maranatha financially and with students from their churches. The letter contained sensitive information, and we hoped that the pastors and alumni would consider the information carefully and that your pastors would use wisdom and godly discretion in discussing it with you and with others under their spiritual care.

    On a very personal level, I know this is a difficult time for you. Because I knew right away many of the details surrounding Dr. Jasper’s resignation, I have spent the past two months trying to sort through my own thoughts and emotions. I realize that many of you are just now hearing some of those details and are experiencing similar conflicts, so I am writing to help you think them through.

    First, I want to assure you that we love Dr. Jaspers and his family and are concerned about them. To be quite frank, our love and respect for him and what he did at Maranatha are the reasons this situation has been so difficult for all of us. Many of us are close personal friends with Dr. Jaspers and his family. I have met with Dr. Jaspers individually and with him and his pastor, Dr. Bob Loggans, several times in these past two months. I can assure you that it is our desire that good come out of this difficult situation for Dr. and Mrs. Jaspers, Katie, and Davis; for Maranatha as an institution; and for you and the rest of the Maranatha family. This is a time for learning and growing spiritually for all of us. It is important to keep our focus on the Lord, not on man. We are confident that Romans 8:28 is true even in the most difficult of circumstances. If our faith in God and his Word cannot help us through times like this, then our faith is not very strong.

    Second, Maranatha is a Bible college that values principles of holiness and integrity, not just in fundamentalism as a movement, but in our personal lives. We expect this of you, our students. We hold our faculty, staff, and administration to a higher level of accountability concerning these same values. Dr. Jaspers, as the president of Maranatha, had the highest level of accountability in areas of personal integrity and righteousness.

    Third, remember that Dr. Jaspers resigned. In his open letter, published on Sharper Iron right after his resignation, Dr. Jaspers stated, “God gave clear direction to our Board and me that this was the time for me to do the right thing.” This was his decision, made willingly on his part, and accepted by the entire Board of Trustees. Dr. Jaspers was convinced that it was God’s will for him to leave Maranatha.

    Fourth, Dr. Jaspers has been a close friend to each Board member; he personally chose a number of them to be on the Board. The members of the Executive Committee have known him, worked with him, and been his friends for over 30 years. The Board members are godly pastors and laymen who, for years, have given sacrificially of their time and resources to support and guide Maranatha. They have been exceptionally generous to Dr. Jaspers and his family, even after his resignation. I have been disappointed over the rumors and opinions circulated about them over the last few weeks (some from students and some from people who have never met them). These criticisms are unwise and unjust. I am encouraged and thankful for a Board of Trustees who will not sacrifice truth and righteousness no matter the cost.

    Fifth, Dr. Jaspers has admitted in his letter of apology to the Board that in the weeks following his resignation, he developed a spirit of bitterness and anger against the Board, demonstrated in several public and private statements. He now realizes that his attitude was completely wrong and has apologized to the Board. The Board has accepted his request for forgiveness. Dr. Jaspers also desires to apologize to you. I have attached his letter.

    The Board, administration, and faculty are committed to maintaining the theological and philosophical direction and the ministry orientation that has always characterized the College. The Board has begun the process of finding God’s choice for the next president of Maranatha. Please be in prayer for them.

    While we all will miss Dr. Jaspers as our president, we also know that Maranatha is more than one person. The same faculty, friends, and staff members you know and love will be here this fall, and we are looking forward to your return. The coaches are getting ready for pre-season. Faculty in-service starts in just a couple of weeks. And you will be back on campus in about a month! Please be in prayer for the Will Galkin team as they prepare for our opening meetings. I trust the Lord will work mightily in our midst.

    If you have any questions, concerns, suggestions, or comments, please call or email me.

    ’Til He Comes,
    Larry R. Oats
    Interim President
    920-261-9300
    [email protected]
    July 26, 2006
     
    #12 Ophelia, Jul 27, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 27, 2006
  13. bapmom

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    Dr. Jaspers is a good man. It has only been recently that he started to feel as if his wife were a widow. Many Godly men have had to be gone alot from their homes during their marriage. This is not necessarily neglect of his home or family.

    Ive been keeping apprised of this situation for the past few months, ever since it first came out, since Im a former Maranatha student. Sometimes those who run MBBC can be a little.............shall we say, clenched? They can take an accusation and run with it. Dr. Jaspers got embarrassed by their accusations, and wrongly lied to the board. In that he was totally wrong, but he admits it.

    I don't believe in any way that this is an indication that Dr. Jaspers should not be in the ministry. He travelled as he was asked to by the college, and it was when they said they wanted him to travel MORE that he decided he could not be gone so much from home, and the time had come for him to resign.
     
  14. Martin

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    Everything else aside I am still concerned about this point. Has this man been demonized for seek medical attention? Does the board not know the difference between massage therapy (which is state licensed) and a massage parlor? How can someone get in touch with members of this "board" to seek a clearification on this matter?
     
  15. Paul33

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    July 19, 2006 public letter from the board

    Dear Friends,

    In Maranatha’s public statement following Dr. Jasper’s resignation, the Board of Trustees cited only “personal reasons” as the basis for his decision. We did not respond to his public statements or discuss the grievous issues and events which made his resignation necessary because we sincerely hoped he would address those matters through counseling and resolve them voluntarily.

    Dr. Jaspers has now attended the counseling provided by the College, with the Executive Committee participating in the final counseling session. Sadly, the counselor discontinued the process because he lost confidence in Dr. Jaspers’ credibility and sincerity. Therefore, it is with great sadness that we share with you the following.

    Shortly before the Board of Trustees meeting on May 11, a college administrator was confronted with accusations from a Watertown massage therapist that Dr. Jaspers had displayed inappropriate behavior during therapy sessions. She stated that three other therapists who had previously treated him had each suffered similar experiences.

    Because the accusations involved the College’s president and individuals outside the college family (rather than personal offenses between believers), the administrator contacted a Board member who is both the College’s legal counsel and a member of the Executive Committee. He required that the accusations be put in writing and then forwarded them to the Executive Committee. He and another committee member then interviewed all four therapists. Their accusations were consistent and credible and raised grave concerns of long-standing misconduct by Dr. Jaspers.

    The committee then discussed the matter with the full Board as soon as it convened. Dr. Jaspers had been traveling outside the country and returned to campus during the meeting. The Board temporarily adjourned its meeting while the Executive Committee confronted him with the accusations. He offered to resign, then met with the full Board, which unanimously accepted his resignation.

    Maranatha is a spiritual ministry and governs its affairs according to scriptural principles; however, it is not a church, and it is not the Board’s role to engage in local church discipline. The Board is able to convene twice a year briefly, with most members attending from great distances at their own expense. It was neither possible nor biblically appropriate that we should supplant local church discipline by conducting a lengthy administrative process, particularly when Dr. Jaspers had repeatedly chosen to be alone with individual therapists, with no other witnesses present to observe or defend him. Rather, the Board determined that, at best, Dr. Jaspers exhibited a reckless lack of judgment and disobedience to biblical admonition, which proved him unfit to lead an institution whose most important mission is training young men for the Gospel ministry.
    In a day when the ministry requires ever greater wisdom, discernment, and prudence, it is utterly unacceptable that a Bible college president should disregard clear scriptural admonitions that are incorporated in both the instructions and counsel given ministerial students and in the faculty standards of conduct. Maranatha’s president is its most visible representative, who symbolizes its purpose and ethos. Maranatha’s testimony and integrity would have been tragically compromised had the Board permitted him to continue leading the College or had we failed to disclose the actual circumstances of his resignation.

    In discussing his resignation, Dr. Jaspers admitted that he had put himself in an indefensible position, that he had lost the Board’s confidence, and that the Board was doing the right thing. He offered his complete cooperation and agreed with the Board’s recommendation that he submit to the spiritual counsel and authority of a third party unconnected with the College. He suggested a nationally respected counselor for that purpose, and the Board agreed.

    Following his resignation, however, Dr. Jaspers issued a public statement that he had resigned because his extensive travel schedule was too great a burden to his family. Instead of acknowledging the underlying reasons for the Board’s loss of confidence, he questioned the Board’s procedure in dealing with his reckless conduct - focusing on the “process” rather than the problem.

    Dr. Jaspers’ statements were especially disappointing because they appeared deliberately calculated to deflect attention from the real issues underlying his resignation. Contrary to his statements’ implications, the Board always had the greatest confidence in him. We gave him great freedom to lead the College, as well as complete autonomy to determine his own schedule and to continue his extensive personal evangelism schedule. While the College certainly benefited from his evangelistic ministry, Board members suggested on several occasions that he reduce his travel schedule for his own sake and for the benefit of our students on campus.

    Since the abrupt discontinuation of Dr. Jaspers’ counseling, Dr. Jaspers has expressed a change in attitude. He has written to the board confessing his “reckless lifestyle while serving as president of Maranatha” and has submitted himself to the authority and counsel of his local church. These circumstances, however, have been and continue to be extremely difficult for us, especially in light of Dr. Jaspers’ faithful service to Maranatha, God’s evident blessing upon the College under his leadership, the previous unanimous support and confidence of the Board, and our anticipation that he would continue to lead Maranatha for many years to come. We are heartbroken because we know that he was God’s man. He was an exceptionally gifted and dedicated servant, and his position will not be easily filled.

    For thirty-eight years, Maranatha has endeavored to maintain a Christian testimony above suspicion or reproach. It has been the work of God, not of any man. As Board members, we are stewards of that work. By the grace of God, we will do our best to honor Him with our stewardship, regardless of the cost. We and the administration ask for your fervent prayers for God’s help during this difficult time, and for His special direction in choosing a new president. We seek His protection and provision for His work and desire that we should be “To The Praise of His Glory.”

    The Board of Trustees
    Maranatha Baptist Bible College
     
  16. Ophelia

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    I was about to post that letter too...

    Just wanted people to have all the news coming from the school about this situation instead of comments from others about it.
     
  17. Paul33

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    May13, 2006 Letter from Dave Jaspers

    Dear Friends,

    I am sorry I was out of touch yesterday while in Michigan and my email account was temporarily interrupted. I know that my decision to resign was a shock to all of you and I do not want there to be any question as to my love for Maranatha and all of our faculty, staff, alumni, and students. I have several important personal decisions to make at this time that are best for my family and me. I will be in touch with all of you as soon as the Lord has given me clear direction as to which, of many paths, He wants us to take.

    My decision to resign was not as quick as things appear. For a long time I have wrestled with the high cost that this job of president demands of me personally and of my family. I have been working non-stop for nearly eight years and it has taken a toll on me physically. More important, though, has been the high cost paid by my family. Kathy has spent the majority of the past eight years sleeping alone, going to church alone like a widow, and having to be both mom and dad to our kids. I have also been greatly convicted about the kind of model I have been to a watching generation. For too long, the landscape of Fundamentalism has been dominated by workaholic leaders who have sacrificed their families for the success of their ministries. Unwittingly, I have been a part of that model. The more I thought about that, the more it bothered me. This inner battle has taken on even larger dimensions as we have been making plans for me to stop teaching classes and to travel even more! I have been in a quandary as to what I should do. I have loved Maranatha to a fault.

    In the providence of God, He allowed a situation to be brought before our Board to show me that now was the right time to make my decision. Immediately, I was flooded with absolute peace that the Lord had allowed this for our good. I am in awe (a word I don’t use often!) at the way God has worked. I want to make it very clear that I love the men on our Board, and we have the greatest respect for each other. Even though this is a difficult time, God gave clear direction to our Board and me that this was the time for me to do the right thing. That is why the explanation has simply been that I resigned for personal reasons. They are very personal reasons, and I am encouraged that I get to start modeling the right approach to ministry rather than a “how to burn out” model of ministry.
    My duties as president ended with my resignation. Dr. Oats has been appointed to lead Maranatha. I believe he will do an incredible job as interim president. We will be staying in Watertown until the middle of August. I have several preaching responsibilities to attend to, but we plan to be here as much as possible. If you would like to contact us, you can use my new email address [email protected]. We love each of you and greatly covet your prayers. We will take the next month or so to sort out our options and to seek the Lord’s leadership. As soon as we know our plans, we will communicate that to everyone.

    Love,
    Dave
     
  18. Paul33

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    Martin, read the July 19, 2006 letter from the board. This letter may answer your questions.

    The board interviewed the message therapists (Let's assume that they do understand the differences). They found the therapists to be credible.

    Jaspers lost his credibility when he lied to the board. He then volunteered to resign. Did so. Then became bitter about resigning. Was not credible or sincere with the counselor who broke off the sessions. MBBC then revealed the "personal reasons" for the resignation. Then Jaspers became repentant and is now seeking help through his home church.

    Jaspers appears to be repentant. Only he knows if he sought or received sexual gratification. Taking him at his word, he did not, but displayed inappropriate behavior. I think I "might" know what that means, but I'm not sure.

    Message therapy aside. He admits he lacked discretion. Fine. What about being gone from home so much?

    Some members of the board say that they asked him to slow down, stay home more, and gave him complete freedom to set his schedule. So it appears unfounded to say the board was making Jaspers travel so much.

    It does not seem appropriate to travel to the extent that one's wife lives like a "widow." John Wesley had this problem, too. His wife eventually left him because he seemed more interested in ministering to "other" women than his own.
     
    #18 Paul33, Jul 27, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 27, 2006
  19. Martin

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    Thanks, I have read that letter. I don't understand why he had a female massage therapist. Most guys will go to male massage therapists, I think most women will go to male therapists as well. I think they chose men because they usually can give a deeper massage than a woman can. Either way most massage therapists are not alone with members of the opposite sex. That would be a dangerous practice for more than one reason. That point aside, if four therapists say that he "displayed inappropriate behavior during therapy sessions" then something is wrong with him.
     
  20. Paul33

    Paul33
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    It seems that Jaspers letter of May 13, 2006 is the reason that all of this has become public knowledge. Jaspers should have limited his statement to "personal reasons" without elaborating. Clearly, the board reacted to his statements that he was resigning to spend more time with his family.

    Should the board have remained quiet - sticking to their original "official" statement? Did the board have an obligation to give additional information in the form of the letter dated July 19, 2006? Were there any liability issues involved? Are there legal issues involved now?

    If Jaspers had simply cited personal reasons and never said anything else, would this have been the end of the story?

    These are important questions that we can learn from. What should we do as "boards," or pastors, or deacon boards if something happens that isn't "criminal" but must be dealt with nonetheless?
     

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