Media military "analysis" more akin to psyops manipulation

Discussion in 'Politics' started by poncho, Apr 24, 2008.

  1. poncho

    poncho
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2004
    Messages:
    19,657
    Likes Received:
    128
    The New York Times today published its blockbuster analysis of the Pentagon psyops program to manipulate public discourse on the Iraq war and related matters by creating a cadre of retired military officers pretending to be independent military analysts on TV. Since these analysts were lobbyists helping their clients get military contracts, they were dependent on close ties in the Pentagon. They understood that independent analysis could threaten their access.
    Those business relationships are hardly ever disclosed to the viewers, and sometimes not even to the networks themselves. But collectively, the men on the plane and several dozen other military analysts represent more than 150 military contractors either as lobbyists, senior executives, board members or consultants….
    The administration has demonstrated that there is a price for sustained criticism, many analysts said. “You’ll lose all access,” Dr. McCausland said.
    They acted in close collaboration with the Pentagon, echoing talking points and helping the military develop strategies to manipulate the media.
    Internal Pentagon documents repeatedly refer to the military analysts as “message force multipliers” or “surrogates” who could be counted on to deliver administration “themes and messages” to millions of Americans “in the form of their own opinions.”
    Though many analysts are paid network consultants, making $500 to $1,000 per appearance, in Pentagon meetings they sometimes spoke as if they were operating behind enemy lines, interviews and tran scri pts show. Some offered the Pentagon tips on how to outmaneuver the networks.
    This was a systematic program designed in the early days of the administration:



    SOURCE...

     
  2. betterthanideserve

    betterthanideserve
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2007
    Messages:
    319
    Likes Received:
    0

    Check out the book PROPAGANDA pg 71 by Edward Bernays [Though many analysts are paid network consultants, making $500 to $1,000 per appearance, in Pentagon meetings they sometimes spoke as if they were operating behind enemy lines, interviews and tran scri pts show. Some offered the Pentagon tips on how to outmaneuver the networks.]

    QUOTE]This was a systematic program designed in the early days of the administration:[/QUOTE]
    Brother it has been around alot longer than that!


    SOURCE...

    [/SIZE][/FONT][/QUOTE]
     
  3. poncho

    poncho
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2004
    Messages:
    19,657
    Likes Received:
    128
    Goebbels would be envious.

    But then it could just be that people really enjoy being lied to and manipulated. Looking around at all the "R&D" supporters here abouts I definately get that impression.

    How many here enjoy being lied to and manipulated? Show of hands?
     
    #3 poncho, Apr 25, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2008
  4. poncho

    poncho
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2004
    Messages:
    19,657
    Likes Received:
    128
    Pentagon Propaganda: So Much Worse Than We Thought

    Clarke and her senior aide, Brent T. Krueger, eventually signed up more than 75 retired military officers who penned newspaper op/ed columns and appeared on television and radio news shows as military analysts. The Pentagon held weekly meetings with the military analysts, which continued as of April 20, 2008, when the New York Times ran Barstow's story. The program proved so successful that it was expanded to issues besides the Iraq War. "Other branches of the administration also began to make use of the analysts. Mr. Gonzales, then the attorney general, met with them soon after news leaked that the government was wiretapping terrorism suspects in the United States without warrants, Pentagon records show. When David H. Petraeus was appointed the commanding general in Iraq in January 2007, one of his early acts was to meet with the analysts."



    SOURCE...
     

Share This Page

Loading...