Merger of PBC and ABBC

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by swaimj, Nov 15, 2008.

  1. swaimj

    swaimj
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  2. Rhetorician

    Rhetorician
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    swaimj Question?

    Hello swaimj,

    I hope you are well and enjoying our Lord Christ's blessings.

    As an alum I would like to ask you a couple of questions:

    1. I see that PBC offers a PhD program. It seems to be rather rigorous. Do you know if their grads have a hard time being placed with all things equal?

    2. Is the school regionally accredited?

    3. Is there focus as narrow as say BJU or Pensacola Christian? What I mean by this is there philosophy of ministry, is it as narrow and as "fundamental" as these other major contributors to that "fundamental" world view and hermeneutic?

    These are honest questions with no false motives intended.

    Praying for the merger for they will need a visit of the person of God's Spirit and His grace during these times.:praying:

    "That is all!"
     
  3. Martin

    Martin
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    Hi Rhetorician,

    I am not answering for swaimj. I am just throwing in my two-cents worth since I have considered PBC's PhD program (in the past).


    ==I don't know if the school has had time to have a graduating class. However it looks like a very solid program.


    ==No, it is a TRACS school. Someone who wants to teach at the seminary or University level should probably get their PhD from schools such as Liberty, Southern, Southeastern, etc. PBC's program is great for pastors (etc) who normally don't need a PhD.

    I am not trying to take away from PBC with that remark, just stating the painful truth. Most Universities, Bible Colleges, and Seminaries only hire professors who hold terminal degrees from RA schools.
     
  4. swaimj

    swaimj
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    I have no knowledge about this one way or the other. Sorry.
    Accredited by TRACS
    In my educational experience at Piedmont, I think I got a very good theological foundation, a good hermenuetical foundation, and a strong foundation for doing expository preaching. I heard very little about the politics of fundamentalism. The tools I gained are still useful. Fundamentalism has changed so much in the 20 years since I graduated, that any instruction they might have given me would be of little use now. I think their emphasis on the tools that matter has remained the same and I think that is why they have survived. Twenty years ago, with TTU, and BJU just a few hours away, and LU and PCC growing like crazy, not very many people thought that PBC would survive. They are not only surviving, they are thriving. Praise God for it!
     
  5. paidagogos

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    Is leadership the key?

    Would agree that the new (well, relatively new) leadership is the key to PBC's growth? Many institutions have a crisis when the original leadership moves off the scene and new leaders arrive. There's a complicated process of providing a new vision, meshing with the employees and students, establishing rapport with the constituency, providing stability, etc. A change of leadership is a time of uncertianty for any organization, IMHO. A SBC school, North Greenville University, experienced remarkable change and growth over a decade ago when new leadership came on board after many years of stagnation and decline. The problems, although superficially financial and a shrinking constituency, of several schools, which have recently closed their doors, seem to relate primarily to a lack of dynamic, progressive leadership. What do you think.
     
  6. swaimj

    swaimj
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    I think I agree with what you are saying. Strong leader types tend to beget administrators. Administrators try to maintain the leader's vision without alteration after he is gone. PBC certainly went through that phase. I think the remarkable thing is that they now seem to have strong leadership AND a commitment to the founder's vision. That is a difficult thing to pull off because the later strong leader often has a vision of his own that may be quite different.

    A recent alumni mailing from PBC said that in the early days of the school, students tended to be 2nd career types (veterans of WWII and Korea). Later the school attracted high school graduates. The school still has a strong emphasis on the latter, today, but, through the on-line school they are attracting many 2nd careerers like they did originally.
     

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