Missionary Baptist History Help Needed Please

Discussion in 'Baptist History' started by Rhetorician, Mar 22, 2016.

  1. Rhetorician

    Rhetorician
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    Hello all,

    I am in need of some primary (or even secondary sources) of the Missionary Baptist Churches in Upper Middle Tennessee. Most of the churches were led by anti-educated clergy, and the "knee-ology" of the bi-vocational minister was all there was basically. I do not say that in a negative way. It is just the way I remember if from my young age when my mom would take me to the revival meetings where there was much ado about and around the "mourner's bench." This has to have a tie to Finney and his "anxious seat" and the Cane Ridge meetings of Eastern Kentucky.

    But as far as I know there has never been a "writing theologian" or "writing historian" up in the hills where my mom was reared--Lafayette, TN--close to Galatin, Carthage, Gainsboro, Red Boiling Springs, et al.

    If you can even offer a glimmer of help I would appreciate it. PM me if you can help!!!???

    rd
     
  2. rsr

    rsr
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    Have you run across "History of Middle Tennessee Baptists, with special reference to Salem, New Salem, Enon and Wiseman associations" by J.H. Grime? I don't know if it specifically addresses the area you're interested in, but I know Carthage is mentioned.
     
  3. Jerome

    Jerome
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    Brooks, Richard Donoho, One hundred and sixty-two years of Middle Tennessee Baptists, 1796-1958 (Nashville, Cullom & Ghertner, 1958)
     
  4. Rhetorician

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    Thanks guys this is a start for sure.

    rd
     
  5. Marooncat79

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    I would also contact some of the oldest churches and see if I could get a copy of their business mtg minutes

    You never know
     
  6. rlvaughn

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    What exactly are you looking for regarding their history? These churches have a background connection to Southern Baptists, and I think there may be some references to their associations in the Encyclopedia of Southern Baptists (though I wouldn't trust its accuracy too far on non-cooperative and/or non-affiliated associations). I believe some of the associations maintained a nominal connection to the SBC until around World War II. Grime's History of Middle Tennessee Baptists (available online) will give some background. Three of these associations are mentioned on page 539 of Tennessee Baptists by Albert W. Wardin, and in various other places in the book. Though you refer to to them as "anti-education" I think we must understand that to be mostly in reference to the ministerial education through seminary. Nevertheless. Elder H. C. Vanderpool obtained a ThD and remained among these churches and was highly respected. He was a driving force behind the Church History Research & Archives Committee which reprinted a lot of old Baptist works. There were also books about various churches and associations, but I don't remember a history about these old-time Missionary Baptists in general (but there may be one).
    http://www.bgdailynews.com/obituari...cle_5f1216b4-4b92-5d09-b4ed-2279fa2a2a82.html

    I wrote this about the independent churches (not in an association) in 2009:
    Old Time Missionary Baptist - 171 churches. These churches place a strong emphasis on a definite salvation experience, and usually have a mourner's bench in or near the front of the church. They tend to usually not have as strong objections to associations and fellowships as some unaffiliated Baptists, and are often found closely fellowshipping with other Old Time Missionary Baptists that are in associations.

    I haven't kept up, but about the same time I identified the following Old Time Missionary Baptist associations in what I called the "Middle Tennessee Correspondence" (by that meaning, though they may not directly correspond with the associations in Middle Tennessee, they are at least in correspondence "down the way" with some other association who does).
    a. Baptist Old Path (MO)
    b. Bethel (IN)
    c. Big Bear Creek (AL)
    d. Cane Creek (MO)
    e. Cedar County (MO)
    f. County Line (MO
    g. Dallas County (MO)
    h. Enon (TN)
    i. Old Time Camden County (MO)
    j. Polk County (MO)
    k. Siloam (KY)
    l. Southwestern District (TN)
    m. St. Clair County (MO)
    n. Wiseman (TN)

    Perhaps one of the best posted on the history of these churches might be Bro. Jerry Reynolds from Missouri. Not sure where he is at now; last I knew he was at Old Union Missionary Baptist Church in Bowling Green, Kentucy -- old of the oldest Baptist churches in that area.
     
    #6 rlvaughn, Apr 30, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2016
  7. rlvaughn

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    Rhet, I looked through my library and found two books by Brother Vanderpool that you might be able to locate and get help from: History of New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church, Davidson County, Tennessee, 1794-1976 and History of Old Union Missionary Baptist Church, Warren County, Kentucky, 1795-1966. On Worldcat.org I found Twentieth century Baptists; biographies of over one hundred ministers. Also sketches in Enon, Wiseman and Siloam Baptist Association and an additional history of other churches by H. C. Vanderpool and W. T. Russell. This was from 1962, but I think Brother Vanderpool updated it near the end of the 20th century. If you look these up on Worldcat.org you may find them in some library near you.
     
  8. Rhetorician

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    Bro Vaughn,

    Thanks for the "come back." But I do not frequent the BB as much as I should. I am busy and in the process of closing out an 18 year college teaching career and about to retire. I am trying to figure out the next step as I follow what I believe to be the Lord's will for a preaching, teaching, research, and writing career. I have just finished four conference papers and power point video I have written on William Carey. I hope to have them published in a short book in the not to distant future Deo Volente! I know it is shameful self advertisement, but I am available to do Carey Conferences.

    As to the research of the Middle Tennessee Baptist. I am mostly interested in those churches and the movement of the upper Cumberland Plateau; say Putnam, Smith, Jackson, Macon, Trousdale, Sumner counties et al. My mom was reared in Macon county in the country. When I was a boy I would be taken to "revival meetin." which make a deep impact on me. I have always wanted to know more about the "mourner's bench" and whether it had any connection to Finney's Anxious Bench. It seems to me that there must be some organic or theological connection.

    The problem I have ran across is the lack of writing Missionary Baptists. I do stand corrected however. I should have better articulated that the ministers of this sect were anti seminary education. I did not mean to leave the impression at all that they were not zealous for the Lord and His Word. They were by no stretch ignorant of that and had a certain desire for the Kingdom's increase. Mea Culpa! Please forgive.

    Now, if you have or can point me to any written theologies concerning this possible connection please let it be know to me. PM me direct if you wish.

    Thank you ahead of time for any consideration.

    I remain fraternally yours.

    rd
     
  9. rlvaughn

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    While the mourner's bench in general in Baptist churches may have some connection back to Finney, I suspect most of these churches would not accept many of the practices of Finney in leading folks to salvation.

    I didn't think you meant anything bad by the anti-education comment and felt I understood what you meant, but thought others might not. I'm not aware of any theological writings by these ministers, thought there may be something more than doctrinal writings in their periodicals, etc. But really what I am familiar with is mostly historical.
     

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