Money system obviously "constitutional"

Discussion in 'Money Talk$' started by billwald, May 30, 2009.

  1. billwald

    billwald
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    From another thread:

    >All hail the (new global) fiat money system then! Personally I can't see what's wrong with a constitutional money system other than the bankers have a hard time inflating and deflating real money.

    First, the Constitution makes no mention at all about the form of money that Congress should issue.

    Second, except 20 years of post-WW2 freak conditions, for the thousands of years that gold was used for money the working class didn't have any gold and very little cash money of any kind. Prior to WW2 half of all Americans lived in poverty.

    Third, I find electronic money and credit cards very handy. Last thing I need is a hoard of gold in my house.
     
  2. poncho

    poncho
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    Well, I've always said that tyranny is alot easier to swallow if it's marketed as being cheap, easy and convienent.


    Article I, Section 8, Clause 2.

    To borrow money on the credit of the United States;

    Article I, Section 8, Clause 3.

    To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes;

    Article I, Section 8, Clause 5.

    To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and fix the standard of weights and measures;

    Article I, Section 9, Clause 1.

    The migration or importation of such persons as any of the states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a tax or duty may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person.

    Article I, Section 10, Clause 1.

    No state shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or confederation; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin money; emit bills of credit; make anything but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of debts; pass any bill of attainder, ex post facto law, or law impairing the obligation of contracts, or grant any title of nobility.

    Amendment VII

    In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise reexamined in any court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.


    SOURCE

    Notice the words in red? Dollars! Okay so what is a dollar?

    Let's flip to the Coinage Act of 1792. Signed by George Washington himself and find out.

    According to this a "dollar" is...371 4/16 grains pure or 416 grains standard silver.

    So, the constitution does mention money billwald. It specifically mentions dollars. And those dollars are defined by the Coinage Act of 1792.

    Now a word from James Madison...a founder of the United States and man who did not ignore history.

    Louis T. McFadden did not ignore history either. See also signature below. You should really read this speech, there's alot of history in it

    On May 23, 1933, Congressman, Louis T. McFadden, brought formal charges against the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve Bank system, The Comptroller of the Currency and the Secretary of United States Treasury for numerous criminal acts, including but not limited to, CONSPIRACY, FRAUD, UNLAWFUL CONVERSION, AND TREASON.

    The petition for Articles of Impeachment was thereafter referred to the Judiciary Committee and has YET TO BE ACTED ON.

    Same with this book, alot of history.

    First published in 1899, republished for the first time in 100 years! The Coming Battle documents from congressional records, newspaper reports and writings by the founding fathers and others a chronology of events long forgotten that shaped our fledgling nation from 1776 to 1899. Read about the manipulation of our money and its supply, the intentional creation of recessions, depressions and panics. The manipulation of the stock markets. The demonetization of silver. A breathtaking history told in the words of a contemporary witness to these events.


    The Coming Battle.


    And this one as well.


    The Creature From Jekyll Island.


    There's a video at this link. Unmasking the Fed. Then if you still have some time on your hands. Read this. Audit The Fed Then End It! Ron Paul. and this. Audit The Federal
    Reserve!

    You know what they say about those who do ignore history doncha billwald?
     
    #2 poncho, May 31, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: May 31, 2009
  3. Bob Alkire

    Bob Alkire
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    So very true, poncho!!!

    As one who enjoys history, thanks for the history lesson. We all need to know our history, the good as well as the bad.

    So many Americans care only if it is easy, gives them something and that someone else pays the bill and if it is equal.

    Times change, some may agree and some may not but I was taught way back when the best one can hope for is to be treated fairly because to treat all equal all would need to work equally for their community. All will not have the same success because of ability, it isn't always equal, but give a 100% of what ability one has.
     
  4. billwald

    billwald
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    Article I, Section 10, Clause 1.
    No state shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or confederation; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin money; emit bills of credit; make anything but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of debts; pass any bill of attainder, ex post facto law, or law impairing the obligation of contracts, or grant any title of nobility.

    The constitution bound the STATES, not the federal govt. The Feds can do and does do several of these things including ex post facto laws.


    Article I, Section 8, Clause 2. To borrow money on the credit of the United States;

    In other words, deficit spending is constitutional.

    Article I, Section 8, Clause 5.

    To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin

    Doesn't define "money," govt can set the official exchange rate.

    >Let's flip to the Coinage Act of 1792. Signed by George Washington himself and find out.

    Immaterial! Coinage Act is NOT part of the constitution.

    >According to this a "dollar" is...371 4/16 grains pure or 416 grains standard silver.

    OK, but not in the Constitution. Congress could have defined a dollar as an oz of mercury, but didn't. Note that congress at this time, not the constitution, established a silver standard, NOT a gold standard.


    >On May 23, 1933, Congressman, Louis T. McFadden, brought formal charges against the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve Bank system, The Comptroller of the Currency and the Secretary of United States Treasury for numerous criminal acts, including but not limited to, CONSPIRACY, FRAUD, UNLAWFUL CONVERSION, AND TREASON.

    >The petition for Articles of Impeachment was thereafter referred to the Judiciary Committee and has YET TO BE ACTED ON.

    Thus a dead issue.

    By the way, when did you last hear of a suit in common law?

     
  5. poncho

    poncho
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    You said..."First, the Constitution makes no mention at all about the form of money that Congress should issue."

    It says, dollars. Twice.

    Looks like we need to know more history billwald.

    Have a look at this. Click Here

    The fiat money system we have in the USA today is not constitutional. Neither is it democratic. It is a private criminal enterprise and it's about time we ended it.

    I'm taking the rest of night off to work on a paper model of a 32 Ford roadster that can be had free here in seven different colors. I haven't built a model in about eight months now because I just haven't had the time. You know how that goes I'm sure. Busy busy busy!

    I did manage to build one of the orignals awhile back after I ran it through Photo Shop. I recolored it red and gave it a bit more detail. Turned out nice too! Now that it's been redrawn by a pro I'm kind of interested in seeing how his version turns out. So far so good! :wavey:
     
    #5 poncho, May 31, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: May 31, 2009
  6. billwald

    billwald
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    Thanks much for the models link. I'll send it to the grandkids.
     

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