NASB Error?

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by preacher4truth, Dec 26, 2011.

  1. preacher4truth

    preacher4truth
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Messages:
    8,121
    Likes Received:
    0
    Reading in my NASB I found what I believe to be an error and oversight.

    1 Kings 10:7 says the following in the NASB:

    "Nevertheless I did not believe the reports, until I came and my eyes had seen it. And behold, the half was not told me. You exceed in wisdom and prosperity the report which I heard."

    Is the last sentence an error? Is there a word or two missing?

    Note that the NASV (1977) has this worded the same way.
     
  2. Deacon

    Deacon
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2002
    Messages:
    6,968
    Likes Received:
    128
    Nope, everything seems to be zipped up proper!

    Rob


    In fact, I had not heard the half of it! Your wisdom and prosperity are far beyond what I was told. (NLT)

    Indeed, I was not even told half. Your wisdom and prosperity far exceed the report I heard. (HCSB)

    And behold, the half was not told me. Your wisdom and prosperity surpass the report that I heard. (ESV)

    Not even half had been told me; your wisdom and prosperity far surpass the report that I had heard. (NRSV)

    and indeed the half was not told me. Your wisdom and prosperity exceed the fame of which I heard. (NKJV)

    and behold, the half was not told me: thy wisdom and prosperity exceedeth the fame which I heard. (AV 1873)
     
  3. preacher4truth

    preacher4truth
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Messages:
    8,121
    Likes Received:
    0

    :laugh:

    No, it's not all "zipped up proper."

    If you actually read the NASB rendering you'd note a word seems to be missing. Obviously you've missed that as you go on to offer other examples as comparison as though they're the same and prove something.

    None of your other comparisons are the same as the NASB as they actually are complete sentences.

    Here is the last sentence. Again: "You exceed in wisdom and prosperity the report which I heard."

    See how it seems to be missing a word or two?

    It should have included "exceed" "surpass" "beyond" or other synonymous words.

    Thanks for all the other examples, I realize they have it correctly rendered.
     
  4. JesusFan

    JesusFan
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2011
    Messages:
    6,356
    Likes Received:
    0
    What does it state in the hebrew text for that passage?
    is it the case of not able to gave an exact literal translation from hebrew into english?
     
  5. gb93433

    gb93433
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2003
    Messages:
    15,496
    Likes Received:
    6
    Every English translation I have seen does not translate the Hebrew word "for you" in Genesis 12:1.
    [FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT]​
     
  6. Deacon

    Deacon
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2002
    Messages:
    6,968
    Likes Received:
    128
    "You exceed in wisdom and prosperity the report which I heard."

    Wait a bit and I'll parse the Hebrew.


    Rob
     
  7. preacher4truth

    preacher4truth
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Messages:
    8,121
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nevermind friend, you still don't see it.

    No need to parse.

    You're not seeing the incomplete sentence structure in the NASB rendering of the second half of the verse.
     
  8. matt wade

    matt wade
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    6,156
    Likes Received:
    76
    The sentence is grammatically correct. It is not missing any words. You could reduce it by saying "You exceed the report which I heard."
     
  9. JesusFan

    JesusFan
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2011
    Messages:
    6,356
    Likes Received:
    0
    Would that be due to them deciding not to 'smooth" over the Hebrew construction of the verse?
     
  10. preacher4truth

    preacher4truth
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Messages:
    8,121
    Likes Received:
    0
    That's possibly it. The sentence is definitely an incomplete thought. It made me take a double-take, as I am reading through the NASB slowly and thoughtfully I took notice of this, thinking I missed something.

    It is also amazing the Sovereign acts of God I see in this version in many passages.

    I am enjoying this version more and more. However, I think there should be a correction here in this verse, to at least make the latter portion of said verse a complete sentence.
     
  11. preacher4truth

    preacher4truth
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Messages:
    8,121
    Likes Received:
    0
    Not quite.

    The sentence is not gramatically correct. It is an incomplete thought and sentence.

    Basic English would suggest such. Any person making such a statement would be told, truthfully, that their sentence is incomplete, or is poorly structured.
     
    #11 preacher4truth, Dec 26, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2011
  12. JesusFan

    JesusFan
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2011
    Messages:
    6,356
    Likes Received:
    0
    Now you know why both the ASV/NASB were tagged with the saying " Strong in Greek/hebrew, but weak in english!"

    Best English version for fidelaty to original language texts, but at time structuring leaves something to be desired!
     
  13. preacher4truth

    preacher4truth
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Messages:
    8,121
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've not witnessed any other areas -yet- where I'd affirm that it is "weak in English."
     
  14. matt wade

    matt wade
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    6,156
    Likes Received:
    76
    It's not the clearest presentation possible, but it doesn't mean the sentence is technically incorrect. It is grammatically correct. It's not an incomplete sentence.
     
  15. preacher4truth

    preacher4truth
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Messages:
    8,121
    Likes Received:
    0
    So to you "You exceed in wisdom and prosperity the report which I heard" is a complete sentence?

    OK.
     
    #15 preacher4truth, Dec 26, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2011
  16. matt wade

    matt wade
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    6,156
    Likes Received:
    76
    Not just to me, to the rules of the English language.

    I agree that it isn't a very clearly written sentence. It could be written so that it reads more clearly, but it is a complete and valid sentence.

    Again, we can reduce it to:

    You exceed the report which I heard.

    Would you agree that is a valid sentence?
     
  17. Jerome

    Jerome
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2006
    Messages:
    5,603
    Likes Received:
    44
    It's a complete sentence, period.

    You = subject
    exceed = verb
    in wisdom and prosperity = adverbial prepositional phrase
    the report = direct object
    which I heard = relative clause
     
    #17 Jerome, Dec 26, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2011
  18. preacher4truth

    preacher4truth
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Messages:
    8,121
    Likes Received:
    0
    "Period?" :laugh:

    Not quite. :wavey:
     
  19. preacher4truth

    preacher4truth
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Messages:
    8,121
    Likes Received:
    0
    Reducing the sentence shows a correction, so yes, the sentence you give makes a completed thought.

    Your sentence isn't the one in question. :)
     
  20. matt wade

    matt wade
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    6,156
    Likes Received:
    76
    The phrase "in wisdom and prosperity" simply describes how "You exceed".

    The sentence in the NASB is a complete sentence.
     

Share This Page

Loading...