NASB is it really real

Discussion in '2003 Archive' started by romanbear, May 7, 2003.

  1. romanbear

    romanbear
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    Hi everyone;
    The NASB was impart translated from the text found in Alexandra By men who were not theologins or translators there names Wescott and Hort. In there expertice what would you say gave them ability to do such a job? Since there is no 2000 year old dictionary of greek and although Homers unusual expression had been defined in the first century. but only in a glossery form. What makes people think that just because they study greek for a few years or so that they know what they are talking about. when they say this greek word means this or that? or was used in this way or that? We all know that Language changes over time so all of us maybe way off of the true meaning of what was actually meant.
    Romanbear
     
  2. Refreshed

    Refreshed
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    Romanbear,

    I think we can get a fairly accurate picture of the Greek from context. There are other documents that contain the Koine Greek such as bills of sale, etc. I believe all but about 50 words in the entire New Testament have been found in extra-biblical documents.

    I don't know if I really understand your question, though, because didn't the KJV translators have to read the Greek and understand it as well?

    Jason :D
     
  3. romanbear

    romanbear
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    Hi Refreshed;
    Your right they did so what makes any of them sure about the translations. What I'm getting at I'm often told by students of the Greek language that this word or that word means so and so. And they right away want to retranslate the scripturess for me to fit there doctrine. Bills and such is not enough to translate the scriptures unless you're talking about wine. We are talking about the scriptures.

    I'm not trying to defend any particular Bible Just trying to figure out how so many experts in the greek language know so much, that is practicaly impossible to know. Just seems to me if these guys here who disscuss it all the time should be able to give me a good answer other than just bills,or words found in documents. they had to have a way of defining them. Since Language changes over time. Doesn't someone on this board know?Or have a reasonable answer.
    Romanbear
     
  4. KenH

    KenH
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    Didn't the Greek language, was it Koine Greek, that the New Testament was written in go out of usage shortly after the canon was written? And thus providing us with a static language to learn definitions from? Perhaps those learned in this field could answer this.
     
  5. Dr. Bob

    Dr. Bob
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    Most languages have a 500 years window of development. Words are added, meanings change, then (in past times) the entire language morphs.

    Latin has a longer "shelf life" than most. Classical Greek (predating Common or Koine' Greek) was about 500; Koine' about 500 years.

    We can go back to a good classical greek lexicon (dictionary) and study the origins of words and how they were used in pre-Christian times. And then in koine lexicons.

    By the time the Eastern Orthodox (Catholic) Church was making copies of copies of copies - the greek documents underlying the Byzantine texts used by the AV1611 - koine' Greek was not spoken. Latin was the writing of scholarship, such as it was until the rise of national languages in the 14th C.

    So today, the Greek of the Bible is very static and we can go back and find definitive meaning to words and parse them with gread exactness. Greek is ten times more EXACT than English in tenses of verbs, gender and cases of nouns/adjectives.

    It does not take a great Greek Scholar to get a Greek interlinear NT and lexicon and delve in much more richly than anything the English translations can provide (even the AV1611)
     
  6. rsr

    rsr
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    Koine is still the language of the Greek Orthodox liturgy, and the Septuagint is its official Old Testament.

    CHURCH REJECTS MODERN GREEK

    Greek also was the official language of the Eastern Roman Empire until the fall of Constantinople in 1453, after which many Greek scholars and manuscripts found their way to the West.
     
  7. Harald

    Harald
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    Me thinks that one of the reasons people seemingly shun the Greek Testament is due to some silly KJV superstition, that only the KJV has fixed the word of God, even so that it is superior to the Greek from which it was translated. The talk about Koine Greek being a "dead language" is nothing but a pathetic strawman.


    Harald
     

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