Nazarite vow

Discussion in '2003 Archive' started by Eyes on Jesus, Nov 7, 2003.

  1. Eyes on Jesus

    Eyes on Jesus
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2003
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0
    Could someone please tell me, was Jesus a nazarite as in did he take a nazarite vow, like samson?
     
  2. Eyes on Jesus

    Eyes on Jesus
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2003
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0
    thanks diane, although it really did not answer my question, i really like the link to the site, and yes I do need to study, lol
     
  3. Caretaker

    Caretaker
    Expand Collapse
    <img src= /drew.gif>

    Joined:
    May 20, 2002
    Messages:
    634
    Likes Received:
    0
    Definition: \Naz"a*rite\, n.
    A Jew bound by a vow to lave the hair uncut, to abstain from
    wine and strong drink, and to practice extraordinary purity
    of life and devotion, the obligation being for life, or for a
    certain time. The word is also used adjectively.




    Easton Bible Dictionary

    Definition: (Heb. form Nazirite), the name of such Israelites as took on them the vow prescribed in Num. 6:2-21. The word denotes generally one who is separated from others and consecrated to God. Although there is no mention of any Nazarite before Samson, yet it is evident that they existed before the time of Moses. The vow of a Nazarite involved these three things, (1) abstinence from wine and strong drink , (2) refraining from cutting the hair off the head during the whole period of the continuance of the vow, and (3) the avoidance of contact with the dead.

    When the period of the continuance of the vow came to an end, the Nazarite had to present himself at the door of the sanctuary with (1) a he lamb of the first year for a burnt-offering, (2) a ewe lamb of the first year for a sin-offering, and (3) a ram for a peace-offering. After these sacrifices were offered by the priest, the Nazarite cut off his hair at the door and threw it into the fire under the peace-offering.

    For some reason, probably in the midst of his work at Corinth, Paul took on himself the Nazarite vow. This could only be terminated by his going up to Jerusalem to offer up the hair which till then was to be left uncut. But it seems to have been allowable for persons at a distance to cut the hair, which was to be brought up to Jerusalem, where the ceremony was completed. This Paul did at Cenchrea just before setting out on his voyage into Syria (Acts 18:18).

    On another occasion (Acts 21:23-26), at the feast of Pentecost, Paul took on himself again the Nazarite vow. "The ceremonies involved took a longer time than Paul had at his disposal, but the law permitted a man to share the vow if he could find companions who had gone through the prescribed ceremonies, and who permitted him to join their company. This permission was commonly granted if the new comer paid all the fees required from the whole company (fee to the Levite for cutting the hair and fees for sacrifices), and finished the vow along with the others. Four Jewish Christians were performing the vow, and would admit Paul to their company, provided he paid their expenses. Paul consented, paid the charges, and when the last seven days of the vow began he went with them to live in the temple, giving the usual notice to the priests that he had joined in regular fashion, was a sharer with the four men, and that his vow would end with theirs. Nazarites retired to the temple during the last period of seven days, because they could be secure there against any accidental defilement" (Lindsay's Acts).

    As to the duration of a Nazarite's vow, every one was left at liberty to fix his own time. There is mention made in Scripture of only three who were Nazarites for life, Samson, Samuel, and John the Baptist (Judg. 13:4, 5; 1 Sam. 1:11; Luke 1:15). In its ordinary form, however, the Nazarite's vow lasted only thirty, and at most one hundred, days. (See RECHABITES.)

    This institution was a symbol of a life devoted to God and separated from all sin, a holy life.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


    There is no mention of Jesus taking a Nazarite vow, but it appears that John the Baptist was a Nazarite for life as was Sampson.

    A servant of Christ,
    Drew
     
  4. HankD

    HankD
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2001
    Messages:
    15,158
    Likes Received:
    322
    Numbers 6
    2 Speak unto the children of Israel, and say unto them, When either man or woman shall separate themselves to vow a vow of a Nazarite, to separate themselves unto the LORD:
    3 He shall separate himself from wine and strong drink, and shall drink no vinegar of wine, or vinegar of strong drink, neither shall he drink any liquor of grapes, nor eat moist grapes, or dried.
    4 All the days of his separation shall he eat nothing that is made of the vine tree, from the kernels even to the husk.

    The word liquor is "mishrah" is actually "juice".
    But verse 4 makes it clear that even grape juice can not be consumed by a Nazirite while under his vow.

    So Jesus was not a Nazirite as He celebrated the Passover with His Apostles. Some believe that He did not use alcoholic wine but it doesnt matter whether it was alcoholic or not, both wine and grape juice were forbidden for the Nazirite.
    It appears that He did drink something at the passover and that it was a grape beverage.

    Mark 14:25 Verily I say unto you, I will drink no more of the fruit of the vine, until that day that I drink it new in the kingdom of God.

    HankD
     
  5. Mike McK

    Mike McK
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2001
    Messages:
    6,630
    Likes Received:
    0
    No. Jesus was a Nazarene, not a Nazarite.
     
  6. Debby in Philly

    Debby in Philly
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2003
    Messages:
    2,537
    Likes Received:
    0
    What would be the reason that Paul would do this? Since as Christians we are not bound by the law. Or did it have the same reasoning we would use today for a period of fasting and prayer? What does this practice mean to us today?
     
  7. Jailminister

    Jailminister
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Messages:
    907
    Likes Received:
    0
    Debby, the only known Nazarite vow takers in the bible was Samson, Samuel and possibly John The baptist. It is not for sure that Paul took a Nazarite vow. He may have taken a vow of fasting. I have heard of some men taking a Nazarite vow, but really the only thing they did was let their hair grow out. They really did not do the other things that came along with the Nazarite vow. I highly suspect that they just wan long hair and using the vow as an excuse to do so, which is really rebellion.

    PS. Jesus did not have long hair. That was a painting by Leonardo da Vinci, that statrted that notion. Da Vinci was a sodomite and had long hair, which the bible says is a shame.
     
  8. Aaron

    Aaron
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2000
    Messages:
    15,666
    Likes Received:
    225
    Interesting. Sources?
     
  9. Jailminister

    Jailminister
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Messages:
    907
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am not sure which part you want sources on but look here:
    Click Here
     
  10. Artimaeus

    Artimaeus
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2002
    Messages:
    3,133
    Likes Received:
    0
    [​IMG]
     
  11. mioque

    mioque
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2003
    Messages:
    3,899
    Likes Received:
    0
  12. HankD

    HankD
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2001
    Messages:
    15,158
    Likes Received:
    322
    After reading the so-called supporting “documentation”, I see that this charge is based upon suppositions and anonymous accusations made several hundreds of years ago later supported by a dream interpretation and painting analyses by Sigmund Freud.


    HankD
     

Share This Page

Loading...