New Orleans to be reinhabited - but not by nasty poor people

Discussion in '2005 Archive' started by Matt Black, Sep 12, 2005.

  1. Matt Black

    Matt Black
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    Yes. While the poor, mostly black, residents of New Orleans are stuffed first into the Superdome and Convention Center, then shipped hither and yon across the U.S. South, the wealthy of New Orleans are taking charge.

    In a front page article in the Wall Street Journal last Thursday (Sept. 8), the wealthy in their dry houses (built on higher ground) now have electricity and water to flush their toilets with. In the meantime they have protected their mansions with private security forces and used the local greensward on the park as a heliport to fly in needed gasoline for the generators, along with liquor, kippers and other "necessary" supplies.

    This weekend, they will all gather in Dallas with Mayor Nagin to plan how to rebuild the city. Some have said openly and are directly quoted, that they want to rebuild a city with not nearly so many poor people in it. (Not that they want to raise their standard of living, mind you. Just make sure that now that those folks are gone, that they stay gone).

    I can't link to the article since it is a subscription site. And I can't retype it here because of copyright. But run to your local library, or to the pile of last week's Journals in the waiting room of your office and read it.

    So New Orleans will become a kind of "cultural" Las Vegas for partying tourists and rich oil folks. And the poor? Well, as Barbara Bush said, they'll probably be happier in shelters anyway!!!!!
    :mad:
     
  2. carpro

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    I don't think it much matters what they think.

    Many of the refugees will stay where they are. The reason is simple. They have nothing to go back to and many realize they have a chance for a fresh start in life. A rare opportunity for the poor.


    Katrina may be a blessing in disguise to tens of thousands of the New Orleans poor.
     
  3. prophecynut

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    http://rense.com/general67/hebec.htm



    Dallas meeting plans reconstruction of New Orleans without poor African Americans. According to well-informed New Orleans sources, New Orleans' wealthiest families, including those who are direct descendants of the French who settled New Orleans (not the Acadians [Cajuns] who were poor refugees from British tyranny in Nova Scotia) are meeting in Dallas today with Bush administration officials, New Orleans city officials, wealthy Texas oilmen, and bankers to plan for the reconstruction of New Orleans. These wealthy New Orleans residents live in the gated community of Audobon Place, a section of the city near the Garden District replete with personal helipads that still has running water and sewage and was only slightly affected by hurricane Katrina. It is now reportedly being patrolled by private Israeli security forces. Yesterday's Wall Street Journal ran a piece with more details on this story.
     
  4. El_Guero

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    How many times did I write that we need to raise (elevate) the entire city ...

    Just a reminder ...
     
  5. LadyEagle

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    PN, remember the recent Supreme Court ruling about eminent domain.

    The questions beg to be asked:

    What IF the levee was blown up so that this plan could be implemented at the most opportune time without suspicion (i.e., blame it on Katrina)?

    What IF that's the reason the busses weren't used to evacuate people?

    What IF that's the reason there was no food or water in the Convention Center and Super Dome?

    What IF this is the new way to get rid of certains sections of cities? What city will be next?

    One thing I do know - the Bible tells me there is wickedness in high places and that man's heart is deceitful above all things and desperately wicked, who can know it?
     
  6. carpro

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    But there was food and water at the Astrodome.
     
  7. LadyEagle

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    Yes there was, but the Astrodome is in Texas and they didn't get shuttled there until Thursday or Friday - 3-4 days after the levees broke.
     
  8. TexasSky

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    Well, as Barabara said, they're better off in Texas than they were in New Orleans. Maybe this is God's purpose in allowing this. He was not cursing people, He was showing the world how the poor are treated in Louisiana and allowing the poor a chance to find better states to build lives in.
     
  9. Squire Robertsson

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    While there may have been some wishful thinking on the part of some rich pinheads, the wishes will crash into reality.

    Though, it is worthwhile to remember the experiences of Galveston and Huston. Before the hurricane that wiped Gaveston all but clean, it was the city of the Texas Gulf Coast. After the hurricane and the building of the Huston ship channel, Galveston faded from her former glory. So, just looking at the historical record, I'd say Baton Rouge is looking at better days.
     
  10. El_Guero

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    Squire

    That is the first that I have heard that view of history. Where did you get such a view point?
     
  11. Filmproducer

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    Many of the refugees will stay where they are.

    I would like to remind everyone that these people are NOT refugees. You may not be offended by the term, but I am. They are evacuee's from an American city.

    Here is the legal definition of a refugee, according to US law:

    REFUGEE - Any person who is outside any country of such person's nationality or, in the case of a person having no nationality, is outside any country in which such person last habitually resided, and who is unable or unwilling to return to, and is unable or unwilling to avail himself or herself of the protection of, that country because of persecution or a well-founded fear of persecution on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion. 8 U.S.C. S 101(a)(42)(A)
     
  12. Johnv

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    One of the false notions in the OP is that the persons who built their houses on higher ground are "wealthy". Many of those are middle-income, who won't be able to make their next mortgage payment because their place of employment no longer exists, or because their income has in some other way been affected.

    Further, the OP paint the false picture that there were no middle or upper class families whose homes are under water, blown away, or both. That's a clear and simple falsehood. Additionally, the OP presumes that there were no underprivileged persons living in areas that were above water. That, too, is a falsehood.
     
  13. El_Guero

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    A person seeks refuge from storms as well as from warfare.
     
  14. Filmproducer

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    Of that I do not disagree. Please read the LEGAL definition of a refugee. They are evacuees. As I said I am offended to hear them called refugees, why is it such a problem to call them evacuees? We did not call the people, from Port St. Lucy, who stayed for months in Orlando shelters, refugees after Hurricane Charlie, lets pay the same courtesy to the victims of Katrina.
     
  15. carpro

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    [​IMG]

    I misspoke myself, but I'm still right. There was food and water at the SUPERdome.
     
  16. carpro

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    You call 'em whatever you like. People that seek refuge are refugees. I'm not into political correctness.

    BTW Are you a member of the PC police?
    ;)
     
  17. prophecynut

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    LadyEagle

    You and Poncho are able to recognize the pattern of deceit and corruption in the way FEMA handled Katrina, this link has some of the known improprieties:

    http://www.rense.com/general67/femwont.htm

    They were involved in the same way with 9-11:

    http://www.whatreallyhappened.com/fematape.html

    and also the Oklahoma City bombing of the Murray building.

    There is no doubt FEMA and other government agencies are evil organizations disguised as wolves in sheep clothing. Those in high places who kill and destroy give homage to the God of this world.
     
  18. Filmproducer

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    You call 'em whatever you like. People that seek refuge are refugees. I'm not into political correctness.

    BTW Are you a member of the PC police?
    ;)
    </font>[/QUOTE]No, I am not, and normally I would not care. I once read thread where the question was asked why many Baptists are considered racists. You may not mean anything by the term, but the term is considered derogatory, when not used in the correct context. It is this callous attitude of , "I'll call them whatever I please," that falsely gives some Baptists a bad name.

    The term offends me, so I must be one of those person's who cries racism all the time, right? Wrong, I am not blaming anything on race but the term still is derogatory. Did you know that many news stations, have retracted this term? There is a reason for it, my friend.
     
  19. carpro

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    Yep. Knew it. Don't care.

    There is nothing derogatory about the word "refugee" except in your own mind. Get over it.
     
  20. Bunyon

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    FP,

    I don't mind not calling them refugees for you, but why do I get the feeling we would not be having this conversation if it was an all white city?
     

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