NOAA Reinstates July 1936 As The Hottest Month On Record

Discussion in 'News / Current Events' started by Revmitchell, Jun 30, 2014.

  1. Revmitchell

    Revmitchell
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    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, criticized for manipulating temperature records to create a warming trend, has now been caught warming the past and cooling the present.

    July 2012 became the hottest month on record in the U.S. during a summer that was declared “too hot to handle” by NASA scientists. That summer more than half the country was experiencing drought and wildfires had scorched more than 1.3 million acres of land, according to NASA.

    According to NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center in 2012, the “average temperature for the contiguous U.S. during July was 77.6°F, 3.3°F above the 20th century average, marking the warmest July and all-time warmest month on record for the nation in a period of record that dates back to 1895.”

    “The previous warmest July for the nation was July 1936, when the average U.S. temperature was 77.4°F,” NOAA said in 2012.

    This statement by NOAA was still available on their website when checked by The Daily Caller News Foundation. But when meteorologist and climate blogger Anthony Watts went to check the NOAA data on Sunday he found that the science agency had quietly reinstated July 1936 as the hottest month on record in the U.S.



    Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2014/06/30/n...as-the-hottest-month-on-record/#ixzz36BLALWgV
     
  2. OnlyaSinner

    OnlyaSinner
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    eleven states had their hottest day ever in July 1936, from Kansas to New Jersey and from West Virginia to North Dakota. Two more set the record in August 1936. I found no other month/year with more than three record highs held - July 1911 and July 1934 have three each. Single days' highs aren't the same as monthly averages, but since the July 1936 records occurred on six different days from 7/6 thru 7/24, we can be assured it was a month of widespread and extensive heat.
     

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