North American Theological Society

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by rpniman, Dec 28, 2007.

  1. rpniman

    rpniman
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2007
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    This online seminary program was suggested as a viable alternative to a conventional accredited university. My question is this:

    Does anyone have knowledge of the material taught in the curriculum and if so does it remain consistent with primary Baptist beliefs. The program does award degrees (which I know many won't respect because it doesn't carry the weight of regional accreditation) which are legal due to the religious exemption.

    Please respond if you have FACTUAL information pertaining to the curriculum. I'm not interested subjective opinions based on the institution's lack of accreditation. Any future pastoring I will be involved in will more than likely be supported by my local Baptist church (which my father is currently pastor) and I would be ordained by that church. I am only curious if the curriculum being taught jives with primary Baptist beliefs, not if you personally think a non accredited degree program is worthwhile.

    Thanks for any insight you can provide.
     
  2. TCGreek

    TCGreek
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2006
    Messages:
    7,373
    Likes Received:
    0
    While it has neither RA or NA, it is 100% free and has the endorsement of both Dr. Gentry and Dr. John Frame. Should count for something in the Reformed community.
     
  3. rpniman

    rpniman
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2007
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the feedback. Do you think the curriculum would support a Calvinist philosophy? I just ask because the organization it is affiliated with, World Reformed Fellowship, seems to be full of Presbyterian institutions. I don't know much about Presbyterian beliefs, but don't they generally believe in a more Calvinist doctrine? And if so isn't that basically a deal breaker in terms of staying consistent with primary Baptist beliefs?

    Thanks again for the feedback.
     
  4. StefanM

    StefanM
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    Messages:
    6,434
    Likes Received:
    73
    It is decidedly Calvinistic.

    http://www.theologyamerica.org/admissions.htm

    "As we are a school that seeks to train up God's children to minister to the Church in the Reformed tradition, we only accept students who adhere to the basics of the Reformed faith as found in the Five Solas and T.U.L.I.P."
     
  5. TCGreek

    TCGreek
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2006
    Messages:
    7,373
    Likes Received:
    0
    Rpniman,

    StefanM has provided quote from their website, which is clearly Reformed.

    As to the question of Baptist beliefs, I must ask you, What do you mean by "primary Baptist beliefs?" Do you have in mind the Baptist confession of 1689 or 1833? What do you really mean?
     
    #5 TCGreek, Dec 28, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 28, 2007
  6. paidagogos

    paidagogos
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2003
    Messages:
    2,279
    Likes Received:
    0
    Quick assessment

    I love this idea! However, I think they are somewhat short in meeting their objective at this point. The curriculium is highly variable. Some parts are very good and some parts are less than seminary or college quality. The whole project suffers, according to appearances, from the malady of many correspondance/DE schools--it was created in a hurry on a shoestring budget.

    It is a great idea to utilize what is already available on the Internet, as they have done, but one must pick and choose with good standards of quality. The problem is that the quality is highly variable. Some of the science and math courses, for example, are less than college-level in rigor or give practically no instruction. They would have done better to use some of the MIT courseware for quality lectures.

    Also, their directed learning activities are poor. To read a book and write summaries for a course is reminiscent of degree mills or less than wonderful schools. There needs to be a variety of learning activities including Q & A, interaction with the instructor, feedback, tests, assigned reading, discussion, interaction with other students, etc. All this can be accomplished within quality DE. There is little or no accountability and testing appears nil.

    Also, I am amazed at their doctrinal inconsistency. For a self-professed Calvinistic school with endorsements from Frame and Gentry, I marvel that they use Chuck Missler's lectures for their courses. Chuck is not a Calvinist by any means. He says many things that would be hard for them to swallow. Perhaps they just chose what's available.

    Overall, I think this is a noble idea that has not achieved its goal yet. Perhaps it will become a credible effort with time and hard work.
     
    #6 paidagogos, Dec 31, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2007
  7. rpniman

    rpniman
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2007
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the feedback about NATS StefanM and Paidagogos.

    When I refer to "primary Baptist beliefs" I'm primarily concerned with the Calvinistic concept of predestination and limited atonement. Wouldn't those two concepts be contradictory to traditional baptist concepts of free will and open salvation?

    Thanks again.
     
  8. larryjf

    larryjf
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2005
    Messages:
    306
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would ask the moderators to excuse my post in the Baptist-only forum.

    I am officially involved with the school discussed in this thread, so if you would like more information please post this in a forum that is not for Baptists only and i would be happy to give info and answer q's.
     

Share This Page

Loading...