Obama Not Ending Rendition, May Expand It

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Bro. Curtis, Feb 1, 2009.

  1. Bro. Curtis

    Bro. Curtis
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    Oh, the leftist blog sites are-a-seething.

    ...."Obviously you need to preserve some tools; you still have to go after the bad guys," said an Obama administration official, speaking on condition of anonymity when discussing legal reasoning behind the decision. Rendition "is controversial in some circles and kicked up a big storm in Europe. But if done within certain parameters, it is an acceptable practice."

    A provision in one of Obama's orders appears to preserve the CIA's ability to detain and interrogate terrorism suspects as long as they are not held for lengthy periods. The little-noticed provision states that the instructions to close the CIA's secret prison sites "do not refer to facilities used only to hold people on a short-term, transitory basis."...



    http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/nation/politics/bal-te.rendition01feb01,0,3635832.story?track=rss
     
  2. windcatcher

    windcatcher
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    Extraordinary rendition and irregular rendition are terms used to describe the apprehension and extrajudicial transfer of a person from one state to another,[1] and the term "torture by proxy" is used by some critics to describe situations in which the U.S. has transferred suspected terrorists to countries known to employ harsh interrogation techniques that rise to the level of torture. Torture has been employed with the knowledge or acquiescence of the United States (a transfer of anyone to anywhere for the purpose of torture is a violation of US law), although Condoleezza Rice,(then the United States Secretary of State), stated in an April 2006 radio interview that the United States does not transfer people to places where it is known they will be tortured.[1][2][3]

    The US program prompted several official investigations in Europe into secret detentions and unlawful inter-state transfers involving Council of Europe member states. June 2006 report from the Council of Europe estimated 100 people had been kidnapped by the United States' Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) on EU territory, with the cooperation of Council of Europe members and rendered to other countries, often after having transited through secret detention centers ("black sites") used by the CIA, some sited in Europe. According to the separate European Parliament report of February 2007, the CIA has conducted 1,245 flights, many of them to destinations where suspects were tortured, in violation of article 3 of the United Nations Convention Against Torture.[4] A large majority of the European Union Parliament endorsed the report's conclusion that many member states tolerated illegal actions of the CIA and criticized several European governments and intelligence agencies for their unwillingness to cooperate with the investigation.

    Historical Instances
    While legal rendition has been used by the United States increasingly since the 1980s as a method for dealing with foreign defendants[citation needed], extraordinary rendition is a wholly extra-legal process that differs in its nature and usage as a tool in the US-led "war on terror".[5] Modern methods of rendition include a form where suspects are taken into US custody but delivered to a third-party state, often without ever being on American soil, and without involving the rendering country's judiciary; they have been termed "extraordinary rendition".[citation needed] The CIA was granted permission to use rendition in a presidential directive signed by President Bill Clinton in 1995,[6] and the practice has grown sharply since the September 11 terrorist attacks.[citation needed]

    Critics have accused the CIA of rendering suspects to other countries in order to avoid US laws proscribing due process and prohibiting torture, even though many of those countries have, like the US, signed or ratified the United Nations Convention Against Torture.[7] Critics have also called this practice "torture flights".[8] Defenders of the practice argue that culturally-informed and native-language interrogations are more successful in gaining information from suspects.[9][10]

    In a number of cases, suspects to whom the procedure is believed to have been applied later were found to be innocent.[11] In the cases of Khalid El-Masri and Maher Arar the practice of extraordinary rendition appears to have been applied to innocent civilians, and the CIA has reportedly launched an investigation into such cases (which it refers to as "erroneous rendition").

    The first well-known rendition case involved the Achille Lauro hijackers in 1985: while in international air space they were forced by United States Navy fighter planes to land at the Naval Air Station Sigonella, an Italian military base in Sicily used by the U.S. Navy and NATO, in an attempt to place them within judicial reach of United States Government representatives for transport to and trial in the United States.[


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    Thankyou Wikipedia.
     
  3. Bro. Curtis

    Bro. Curtis
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    Bumping......
     

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