Obama Urges Paterson to Reconsider N.Y. Gov. Race

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Revmitchell, Sep 20, 2009.

  1. Revmitchell

    Revmitchell
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2006
    Messages:
    38,371
    Likes Received:
    790
    National Democratic Party leaders have asked Gov. David Paterson to consider withdrawing from the 2010 governor's race, according to two senior New York Democratic advisers.

    Both advisers, who are close to the governor, spoke to The Associated Press on Saturday on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak for Paterson. The sources said it was unclear what Paterson would do in response.

    The New York Times reported Saturday that it was President Barack Obama who requested that Paterson withdraw. The newspaper said political advisers made the suggestion, and Obama approved it.

    The Times reported administration officials as saying the president's request was conveyed to Paterson by Queens Democrat Rep. Gregory W. Meeks, who has developed strong ties with the Obama administration.


    http://www.foxnews.com/politics/ele...-obama-urged-paterson-reconsider-ny-gov-race/
     
  2. padredurand

    padredurand
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    Messages:
    4,384
    Likes Received:
    20
    Gov Paterson's approval rating has hovered around 20% for a while now. I'm not surprised. I have a strong feeling the people of New York would have let the Gov know at the polls. Then again we had Hillary....

    Using the current criteria for news stories I have concluded that the Gov is a victim of racism.

    Perhaps he could play the bias against people with disabilities card touting being legally blind?

    The Governor is being asked to step aside because he cannot govern. New York is in financial crisis and the Governor appears to do little or nothing about it. Spending is out of control and as soon as they figure out how to tax taxes New Yorkers will have the highest tax burden in the nation.
     
  3. saturneptune

    saturneptune
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2006
    Messages:
    13,977
    Likes Received:
    0
    I do not think that his poll numbers or his ability to govern has anything to do with the issue. That is up to the citizens of New York. The point is the federal government (or Obama) has no right to interfear in internal state affairs. The Constitution grants certain powers to the federal government and certain powers to the states. Manipulating state level elections is not one of those powers given to the federal government.
     
  4. padredurand

    padredurand
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    Messages:
    4,384
    Likes Received:
    20
    I don't see the pressure of federal government trying to influence Gov Paterson's position. I see the power of position influencing another. The President is arguably the most powerful and influential Democrat in the nation. Gov. Paterson holds the distinction of having the lowest approval ratings of any governor in the history of the state. From the Party's perspective, they have a member whose sub-par performance reflects poorly on the Party as a whole ~state or national. Gov Paterson has lost the confidence of the State and now his own party. I see NY Dems throwing their support behind Andrew Coumo regardless of what decisions Paterson makes.

    I don't see where you would conclude that federal powers are being wielded against the state to influence an election. One very powerful Democrat has said to another, "You're not our man. You need to step aside." The fact that one of the powerful Democrats is sitting in the White House is irrelevant.

    Ultimately it is up to the voters of NY to determine who sits in Albany - or more accurately the voters of New York City...
     
  5. Rippon

    Rippon
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2005
    Messages:
    17,407
    Likes Received:
    328
    That's interfere.

    W.S.
     
  6. saturneptune

    saturneptune
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2006
    Messages:
    13,977
    Likes Received:
    0
    You are better at spelling than theology.
     
  7. Winman

    Winman
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Messages:
    14,768
    Likes Received:
    0
    Obama is looking out for himself, he is afraid New York will swing for the Republicans next election.
     
  8. saturneptune

    saturneptune
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2006
    Messages:
    13,977
    Likes Received:
    0
    We have two Republican Senators and five of the six Congressmen are Republican. What Democrats that are in power at the state level tend to be conservative compared to the party. Obama's vote in the last election was in the 30's.

    He has no credibility in this state. You are trying to seperate his role as Democratic leader and President, which is next to impossible to do. I cannot imagine anyone wanting this President relaying such a message to the Democratic Party in Kentucky, and most likely, would be ignored. If we do not like a governor, we will elect a new one, which we do quite regularly. Maybe Obama has that influence in New York, (or NYC, whatever), but he has none here.
     
  9. Rippon

    Rippon
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2005
    Messages:
    17,407
    Likes Received:
    328
    That's not what you said in a PM.
     
  10. padredurand

    padredurand
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    Messages:
    4,384
    Likes Received:
    20
    And we have Chuck Schumer and a spot recently vacated by Hillary Clinton.... enough said...

    New York has a population of 19.4 million people. 8.3 million live in the heavily Democratic NYC, another 1.2 million in the Buffalo area and another million in the greater Rochester area - again highly Democratic areas. President Obama is very influential in the state.

    That said I don't think it is too hard to separate his role as the voice of the Democratic party and the presidency in this respect. For argument's sake let's say the mayor of our village is a member and deacon of the church I pastor. The mayor comes to me and say to the effect, "Pastor, this isn't working. You need to go." and then cites a 19% approval rate among the parishioners. Do I recieve the mayor's advice as coming from a deacon of the church or the mayor of the village? Rightly, the village has no say over the governance of church affairs and would be abusing their vested powers in doing so. I would have to assume the mayor was speaking on behalf of the church as a deacon.

    Governor Paterson's performance is a blight on the party he represents. I would expect the strongest voices in the party to voice their opinions and to press their influence into the situation. Who has the strongest voice in the party but the man seated in the White House? Without the support of the Democrats, Paterson has little to no chance of waging a successful campaign regardless of his current approval.

    What I would view as an imposition of federal powers would be for the president to say would be consequences to the state, ie: cutting of federal funding, or forcibly removing the Governor from office and replacing him without the voice of the voters being heard.
     
  11. Winman

    Winman
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Messages:
    14,768
    Likes Received:
    0
  12. Salty

    Salty
    Expand Collapse
    20,000 Posts Club
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2003
    Messages:
    22,130
    Likes Received:
    221
    I want Gov Patterson to run for Govern again. Its the only chance the Republicans have to retake the Office back.

    Of course, they will need to work with the Conservative Party - if they want our endorsement on Line D of the ballot!
     
  13. saturneptune

    saturneptune
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2006
    Messages:
    13,977
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you reread my post, you will see I was comparing my state (Kentucky) to the situation in New York. You are right, the votes were almost exactly opposite.
     
  14. twpaige

    twpaige
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2002
    Messages:
    443
    Likes Received:
    0
    This just goes to show you how the liberal left will throw their own under the bus at the first sign of trouble in order to keep their claws around a governor's seat. Twenty years ago no one would ever dream of something like this.

    Tsk, tsk, tsk.
     
  15. padredurand

    padredurand
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    Messages:
    4,384
    Likes Received:
    20
    This kind of behavior is not unique to the Dems nor is it new in the recent past. The big difference is 20 years ago it wasn't spread around the world in 60 seconds.
     

Share This Page

Loading...